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201 About Leofric III, earl of Mercia

Leofric (b 968, d 31 Aug or 30 Sep 1057) Earl of Mercia

Parents: Leofwine & his wife Spouse: "Lady Godiva" Godgifu Child: Ælfgar of Mercia

LINKS http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leofric,_Earl_of_Mercia http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofricdied1057B

MEDIEVAL LANDS

LEOFRIC, son of LEOFWINE Ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia (-Bromley 30 Oct 1057, bur Coventry[222]). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names ?Leofricum postea comitem, et Edwinum occisum per Walenses, et Normannum occisum cum Edrico duce Merciorum per Cnutonem regem? as sons of ?Leofwinus comes Leicestriæ?[223]. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre", when recording that he was father of "Herwardus"[224]. This "comitis Radulfi?Scalre" has not otherwise been identified nor any possible relationship with Leofric. Simeon of Durham records that King Canute appointed "Leofric" as Earl of Mercia after his brother Northman was killed in 1017[225], although this was apparently during the lifetime of their father. He and his wife founded the abbey of Coventry in 1043[226]. ?Leofricus comes? founded the monastery of Coventry by undated charter[227]. ?Leofricus comes?et conjux mea Godgyve? donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names ?frater meus Normannus?[228].

m GODGIFU, sister of THOROLD de Bukenhale, Sheriff of Lincolnshire, daughter of ---. She is named as wife of Earl Leofric by Florence of Worcester, who specifies that she and her husband founded monasteries at Leominster, Wenlock, Chester and Stowe[229]. The Annals of Peterborough record that ?Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivæ comitissæ Leycestriæ? founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[230]. Her family origin is also indicated by the undated charter under which ?Thoroldus de Bukenhale?vicecomiti? donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names ?domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestriæ et?comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea?et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hæredis eorum?[231]. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Aediva trinepta Oslaci ducis" as wife of "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre", when recording that they were parents of "Herwardus"[232]. "Oslaci ducis" could be "Oslac" recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as "earl [of Northumbria]" in 966[233], but any precise relationship has not been identified. ?Leofricus comes?et conjux mea Godgyve? donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names ?frater meus Normannus?[234]. Godgifu wife of Leofric granted property to St Mary's, Stow by charter dated [1054/57][235]. She was the Lady Godiva of legend.

Leofric & his wife had [two] children:

1. ÆLFGAR (-[1062]). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names ?Algarus tertius? as son of ?Leofricus tertius?[236]. Florence of Worcester records that he was created Earl of the East Angles in 1053, in succession to Harold Godwinson who had succeeded his father as Earl of Wessex[237]. Florence of Worcester also records that Ælfgar was banished in 1055 by King Edward "without any just cause of offence"[238]. He went to Ireland, then to Wales where he allied himself with Gruffydd ap Llywellyn King of Gwynedd and Powys, and invaded England, sacking Hereford in Oct 1055[239]. He was reinstated in 1056 when Gruffydd accepted Edward's overlordship. Florence of Worcester records that Ælfgar was appointed to succeed his father in 1057 as Earl of Mercia[240], the earldom of the East Angles passing to Gyrth Godwinsson. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that in 1057 he was banished again[241], but Florence of Worcester states that he forced his restoration in 1058 with the help of Gruffydd and a Norwegian fleet[242]. His death removed from the scene the only potential challenger to Harold Godwinson Earl of Wessex. m firstly ÆLFGIFU, daughter of MORCAR & his wife Ealdgyth ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. m secondly ([1058]) --- of Gwynedd, daughter of GRUFFYDD ap Llywellyn Prince of Gwynedd and Powys & his first wife ---. The primary source which confirms her parentage and marriage has not yet been identified. Earl Ælfgar & his first wife had three children:

a) EDWIN (-killed 1071). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names ?Edwinum et Morcar postea comites? as sons of ?Algarus tertius?[243]. He succeeded his father in 1062 as Earl of Mercia. With support from his brother, he expelled Tostig Godwinsson from Lindsay in 1066. John of Worcester records that they at first supported the claim of Edgar Atheling to succeed Harold II as King of England after the battle of Hastings, but soon withdrew their armies and swore allegiance to King William I at Berkhamsted[244]. Florence of Worcester records that "?comites Edwinum et Morkarum?" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][245]. They rebelled against William in 1068, leaving court for Yorkshire, but were soon brought to submission. Orderic Vitalis says that the rebellion was triggered because King William broke his promise to give his daughter in marriage to Edwin[246], and in a later passage that Edwin was killed by his servants while on his way to relieve his brother in Ely[247]. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Edwinus et Morkarus" rebelled against King William in [1071], and that Edwin was killed[248].

b) MORCAR (-after 1087). The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery names ?Edwinum et Morcar postea comites? as sons of ?Algarus tertius?[249]. Snorre names ?Earl Morukare?, although stating that he was the son of ?Earl Gudin Ulfnadson? and ?Earl Ulf´s sister Gyda?[250]. He was chosen by the Northumbrians as Earl of Northumbria in 1065 to replace Tostig, son of Godwin Earl of Wessex. With support from his brother, he expelled Tostig Godwinsson from Lindsay in 1066. John of Worcester records that they at first supported the claim of Edgar Atheling to succeed Harold II as King of England after the battle of Hastings, but soon withdrew their armies and swore allegiance to King William I at Berkhamsted[251]. Florence of Worcester records that "?comites Edwinum et Morkarum?" went with King William to Normandy 21 Feb [1067][252]. They rebelled against William in 1068, leaving court for Yorkshire, but were soon brought to submission. Orderic Vitalis states that Morcar joined the resistance at Ely in 1071[253], but surrendered to the king. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Edwinus et Morkarus" rebelled against King William in [1071], and that "Morkarus?et Siwardus cognomento Barn" took refuge in Ely[254]. Florence of Worcester records that "comites Morkarum et Rogerum, Siwardum cognomento Barn, et Wlnothum regis Haroldi germanum" were released by King William on his deathbed in 1087[255]. He was taken to England by King William II but placed in confinement again in Winchester.

c) EALDGYTH. Florence of Worcester´s genealogies name "regina Aldgitha, comitis Ælfgari filia" as mother of King Harold´s son "Haroldum"[256]. Orderic Vitalis records that "Edwinus?et Morcarus comites, filii Algari?Edgivam sororem eorum" married firstly "Gritfridi?regis Guallorum" and secondly "Heraldo"[257]. Her parentage and marriage to King Harold are confirmed by Florence of Worcester who records that "earls Edwin and Morcar?sent off their sister Queen Elgitha to Chester" after the battle of Hastings[258]. m firstly as his second wife, GRUFFYDD ap Llywellyn Prince of Gwynedd and Powys, son of LLYWELLYN ap Seisyll King of Gwynedd & his wife Angharad of Gwynedd (-killed Snowdonia 5 Aug 1063). m secondly ([1064/early 1066][259]) HAROLD Godwinson, son of GODWIN Earl of Wessex & his wife Gytha of Denmark ([1022/25]-killed in battle Hastings 14 Oct 1066, bur [Waltham Abbey]). He succeeded in 1066 as HAROLD II King of England.

2. [HEREWARD . The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Herwardus" as son of "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre" and his wife "Aediva trinepta Oslaci ducis", being the "Hereward the Wake" of semi-legend[260]. m firstly TURFRIDA, daughter of ---. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis records that "Herwardus" married "Turfrida", adding in a later passage that she became a nun "in Cruland" after she was repudiated[261]. m secondly as her second husband, ---, widow of DOLFIN, daughter of ---. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis records that "Herwardus" married secondly "uxor Dolfini comitis"[262].]
WIKIPEDIA Leofric (born 968, died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was the Earl of Mercia and founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. Leofric is best remembered as the husband of Lady Godiva.

Life and political influence Leofric was the son of Ealdorman Leofwine of the Hwicce, who died c. 1023. Leofric's elder brother Northman was killed in 1017, in the losing battles against Cnut.[1]

The victorious Cnut divided England into four great provinces: Wessex, East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria each of which he eventually placed under the control of an earl (a title new to the English, replacing the Anglo-Saxon "ealdorman"). Mercia he initially left in the hands of Eadric Streona, who had been Ealdorman of Mercia since 1007, but Eadric was killed later in the same year of 1017.[1]

Mercia may have been given to Leofric immediately after that [1]. He had certainly become Earl of Mercia by the 1030s. This made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to Earl Godwin of Wessex among the mighty earls. He may have had some connection by marriage with Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut. That might help to explain why he supported her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacanute, Cnut's son by Emma, when Cnut died in 1035.[2]

However Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by Harthacanute, who made himself unpopular with heavy taxation in his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste the whole area.[3] This command must have sorely tested Leofric. Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacanute died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when he came under threat at Gloucester from Earl Godwin in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. Wise heads counseled that battle would be folly, with the flower of England on both sides. Their loss would leave England open to its enemies. So the issue was resolved by less bloody means. Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time.[1]

Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 his son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. He raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died "at a good old age" in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.[4]

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal device, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia [2].

Religious works Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry.[3] John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."[4]

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly in the grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester,[4], and the endowment of the minster at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire.[5] She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham.[4]

Family Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers. Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039.[1] Godwine died some time before 1057.[5]

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu, it is not clear that she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric only in 1040, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar (whose own children were born in that decade or earlier). If she was married earlier (as early as 1017, as some sources claim), she could have been Ælfgar's mother.

Ælfgar succeeded Leofric as Earl of Mercia.

Notes

1. ^ a b c d The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 2. ^ M. Lapidge, The Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anglo-Saxon England (1999), p.282; The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle 1036 E. 3. ^ The Chronicle of John of Worcester ed. and trans. R.R. Darlington, P. McGurk and J. Bray (Clarendon Press: Oxford 1995), pp.533. 4. ^ a b c The Chronicle of John of Worcester ed. and trans. R.R. Darlington, P. McGurk and J. Bray (Clarendon Press: Oxford 1995), pp.582-3. 5. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle ed. M. Swanton (1996), p. 294.

Wikipedia: Leofric (died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was the Earl of Mercia and founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. Leofric is remembered as the husband of Lady Godiva. Life and political influence

Leofric was the son of Ealdorman Leofwine of the Hwicce, who died c. 1023. Leofric's elder brother Northman was killed in 1017, in the losing battles against Cnut.

The victorious Cnut divided England into four great provinces: Wessex, East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria each of which he eventually placed under the control of an earl (a title new to the English, replacing the Anglo-Saxon "ealdorman"). Mercia he initially left in the hands of Eadric Streona, who had been Ealdorman of Mercia since 1007, but Eadric was killed later in the same year of 1017.

Mercia may have been given to Leofric immediately after that. He had certainly become Earl of Mercia by the 1030s. This made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to Earl Godwin of Wessex among the mighty earls. He may have had some connection by marriage with Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut. That might help to explain why he supported her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacanute, Cnut's son by Emma, when Cnut died in 1035.

However Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by Harthacanute, who made himself unpopular with heavy taxation in his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste the whole area. This command must have sorely tested Leofric. Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacanute died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when he came under threat at Gloucester from Earl Godwin in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. Wise heads counselled that battle would be folly, with the flower of England on both sides. Their loss would leave England open to its enemies. So the issue was resolved by less bloody means. Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time.

Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 his son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. He raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died "at a good old age" in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal device, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia. [edit] Religious works

Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry. John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly in the grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester, and the endowment of the minister at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire. She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham. Family

Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers. Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039. Godwine died some time before 1057.

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu, it is not clear that she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric only in 1040, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar (whose own children were born in that decade or earlier). If she was married earlier (as early as 1017, as some sources claim), she could have been Ælfgar's mother.

Ælfgar succeeded Leofric as Earl of Mercia. [edit] In popular culture

On screen, Leofric has been portrayed by Roy Travers in the British silent short Lady Godiva (1928), George Nader in the film Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955), and Tony Steedman in the BBC TV series Hereward the Wake (1965).
Leofric was the son of Ealdorman Leofwine of the Hwicce, who died c. 1023. Leofric's elder brother Northman was killed in 1017, in the losing battles against Cnut.

The victorious Cnut divided England into four great provinces: Wessex, East Anglia, Mercia and Northumbria each of which he eventually placed under the control of an earl (a title new to the English, replacing the Anglo-Saxon "ealdorman"). Mercia he initially left in the hands of Eadric Streona, who had been Ealdorman of Mercia since 1007, but Eadric was killed later in the same year of 1017.

Mercia may have been given to Leofric immediately after that. He had certainly become Earl of Mercia by the 1030s. This made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to Earl Godwin of Wessex among the mighty earls. He may have had some connection by marriage with Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut. That might help to explain why he supported her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacanute, Cnut's son by Emma, when Cnut died in 1035.

However Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by Harthacanute, who made himself unpopular with heavy taxation in his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste the whole area. This command must have sorely tested Leofric. Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacanute died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when he came under threat at Gloucester from Earl Godwin in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. Wise heads counselled that battle would be folly, with the flower of England on both sides. Their loss would leave England open to its enemies. So the issue was resolved by less bloody means. Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time.

Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 his son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. He raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died "at a good old age" in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal device, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia.

RELIGIOUS WORKS Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry. John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly in the grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester, and the endowment of the minister at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire. She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham.

FAMILY Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers. Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039. Godwine died some time before 1057.

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu, it is not clear that she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric only in 1040, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar (whose own children were born in that decade or earlier). If she was married earlier (as early as 1017, as some sources claim), she could have been Ælfgar's mother.

Ælfgar succeeded Leofric as Earl of Mercia.

Leofric was the son of Leofwine. Founder of the church of Coventry, seen as thegn from 1005, "dux" from 1026, Earl of Mercia by 1032. He married Godgifu. died at Bromley, county Stafford, England.

Child of Leofric and Godgifu

Aelfgar+
Earl of Mercia http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/users/w/i/l/Lisa-A-Wilsonpennington/GENE3-0045.html

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leofric,_Earl_of_Mercia

Leofric married Lady Godiva DE COVENTRY, daughter of Sheriff Of Lincolnshire Thorold DE BUCKINGHAM and Edith MALET. (Lady Godiva DE COVENTRY was born in 980 in Coventry, England and died on 10 Sep 1067 in Coventry, Warwick, England.)

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~whosyomama/18806.htm
King Hardiz, Founder of Counts The Earl Algar mentioned here had succeeded his father Leofric as Earl of Mercia in 1057. Leofric was the husband of Godiva, " the grim earl who ruled in Coventry," and told his wife that if she would ride on horseback naked from one end of the town to the other, he would free the city from the grievous servitude whereunto it was subject.

" I Luriche for the love of thee Do make Coventry Toll free."

Leofric^FGodiva Algar

http://archive.org/stream/cu31924017858899/cu31924017858899_djvu.txt

The most famous residents were Godiva, and her husband Leofric, earl of Mercia who came to their summer home, near the river Trent, to hunt in the dense woodlands that covered most of this area. Leofric died here, and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "... on 30 October, (1057), Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both religious and secular, that benefited all this nation. He was buried at Coventry, and his son Ælfgar succeeded to his authority..."Ælfgar, is their only known child. His daughter Algitha, (also known as Ealdgyth), was wed to Harold Godwineson in the church at Kings Bromley. Their marriage soon ended when Harold was killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. So Godiva, reputed to be one of the four or five richest women in England with estates valued at £160, was for a short time, the grandmother to the queen of England. At Godiva's death in 1067, her lands were forfeited to the Norman king, William the Conqueror.

The Earl Algar mentioned here had succeeded his father Leofric as Earl of Mercia in 1057. Leofric was the husband of Godiva, " the grim earl who ruled in Coventry," and told his wife that if she would ride on horseback naked from one end of the town to the other, he would free the city from the grievous servitude whereunto it was subject.

" I Luriche for the love of thee Do make Coventry Toll free."

Leofric^FGodiva Algar

http://archive.org/stream/cu31924017858899/cu31924017858899_djvu.txt

The most famous residents were Godiva, and her husband Leofric, earl of Mercia who came to their summer home, near the river Trent, to hunt in the dense woodlands that covered most of this area. Leofric died here, and the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle records that "... on 30 October, (1057), Earl Leofric passed away. He was very wise in all matters, both religious and secular, that benefited all this nation. He was buried at Coventry, and his son Ælfgar succeeded to his authority..."Ælfgar, is their only known child. His daughter Algitha, (also known as Ealdgyth), was wed to Harold Godwineson in the church at Kings Bromley. Their marriage soon ended when Harold was killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. So Godiva, reputed to be one of the four or five richest women in England with estates valued at £160, was for a short time, the grandmother to the queen of England. At Godiva's death in 1067, her lands were forfeited to the Norman king, William the Conqueror.

Reigned from 1017 to 1057 (death). Predecessor: Eadric Streona; Successor: Aelfgar, his son.

Leofric (died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was the Earl of Mercia. He founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. Leofric is most remembered as the husband of Lady Godiva. He died at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire of old age.

Rise to power

Leofric was the son of Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce, who witnessed a charter in 997 of King Æthelred II. Leofric had three brothers: Northman, Edwin and Godwine. It is likely that Northman is the same as Northman miles ("Northman the knight") to whom in 1013 King Æthelred II granted Twywell in Northamptonshire.[1] Northman, according to the Chronicle of Crowland Abbey, the reliability of which is often dubious, says he was a retainer of Eadric Streona, the Earl of Mercia.[2] It adds that Northman had been killed by Cnut along with Eadric and others for this reason.[2] Cnut "made Leofric ealdorman in place of his brother Northman, and afterwards held him in great affection."[3] Earl of Mercia Earldoms of England in 1025

Having become earl of Mercia it made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to the ambitious Earl Godwin of Wessex among the mighty earls. Leofric may have had some connection by marriage with Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut. That might help to explain why he was the chief supporter of her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacnut, Cnut's son by Emma of Normandy, when Cnut died in 1035.[4] However, Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by his brother Harthacnut, who made himself unpopular with heavy taxation in his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste the whole area.[5] This command must have sorely tested Leofric. Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacnut died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when he came under threat at Gloucester from Earl Godwin in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. Wise heads counselled that battle would be folly, with the flower of England on both sides. Their loss would leave England open to its enemies. So the issue was resolved by less bloody means. Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time, Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 his son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. He raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died "at a good old age" in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.[6]

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal device, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia.[7]

Historians disagree extensively on the character of Leofric. Folklore tends to depict him as an unfeeling taxer of the people, whereas many object to this as part of the Lady Godiva myth and claim that he was a strong and respected leader. There is also great differentiation in interpreting his reputation as a military leader, with some believing Leofric to have been weak in this respect, but others go as far as even giving him the title 'Hammer of the Welsh'. Religious works Medieval depiction of King Edward the Confessor and Earl Leofric top left.

Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry.[8] John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."[6]

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly in the grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester,[9] and the endowment of the minister at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire.[10] She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham.[6] Family

Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers: Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039 and Godwine died some time before 1057.

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu, it is not clear that she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric later than about 1010, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar, Ælfgar succeeded Leofric as Earl of Mercia. In popular culture

On screen, Leofric has been portrayed by Roy Travers in the British silent short Lady Godiva (1928), George Nader in the film Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955), and Tony Steedman in the BBC TV series Hereward the Wake (1965).
Reigned from 1017 to 1057 (death). Predecessor: Eadric Streona; Successor: Aelfgar, his son.

Leofric (died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was the Earl of Mercia. He founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. Leofric is most remembered as the husband of Lady Godiva. He died at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire of old age.

Rise to power

Leofric was the son of Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce, who witnessed a charter in 997 of King Æthelred II. Leofric had three brothers: Northman, Edwin and Godwine. It is likely that Northman is the same as Northman miles ("Northman the knight") to whom in 1013 King Æthelred II granted Twywell in Northamptonshire.[1] Northman, according to the Chronicle of Crowland Abbey, the reliability of which is often dubious, says he was a retainer of Eadric Streona, the Earl of Mercia.[2] It adds that Northman had been killed by Cnut along with Eadric and others for this reason.[2] Cnut "made Leofric ealdorman in place of his brother Northman, and afterwards held him in great affection."[3] Earl of Mercia Earldoms of England in 1025

Having become earl of Mercia it made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to the ambitious Earl Godwin of Wessex among the mighty earls. Leofric may have had some connection by marriage with Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut. That might help to explain why he was the chief supporter of her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacnut, Cnut's son by Emma of Normandy, when Cnut died in 1035.[4] However, Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by his brother Harthacnut, who made himself unpopular with heavy taxation in his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste the whole area.[5] This command must have sorely tested Leofric. Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacnut died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when he came under threat at Gloucester from Earl Godwin in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. Wise heads counselled that battle would be folly, with the flower of England on both sides. Their loss would leave England open to its enemies. So the issue was resolved by less bloody means. Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time, Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 his son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. He raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died "at a good old age" in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.[6]

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal device, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia.[7]

Historians disagree extensively on the character of Leofric. Folklore tends to depict him as an unfeeling taxer of the people, whereas many object to this as part of the Lady Godiva myth and claim that he was a strong and respected leader. There is also great differentiation in interpreting his reputation as a military leader, with some believing Leofric to have been weak in this respect, but others go as far as even giving him the title 'Hammer of the Welsh'. Religious works Medieval depiction of King Edward the Confessor and Earl Leofric top left.

Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry.[8] John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."[6]

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly in the grant of land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester,[9] and the endowment of the minister at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire.[10] She and her husband are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham.[6] Family

Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers: Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039 and Godwine died some time before 1057.

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu, it is not clear that she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric later than about 1010, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar, Ælfgar succeeded Leofric as Earl of Mercia. In popular culture

On screen, Leofric has been portrayed by Roy Travers in the British silent short Lady Godiva (1928), George Nader in the film Lady Godiva of Coventry (1955), and Tony Steedman in the BBC TV series Hereward the Wake (1965).
Leofric (died 31 August or 30 September 1057) was an Earl of Mercia. He founded monasteries at Coventry and Much Wenlock. Leofric is most remembered as the husband of Lady Godiva.

Leofric was the son of Leofwine, Ealdorman of the Hwicce, who witnessed a charter in 997 for King Æthelred II. Leofric had three brothers: Northman, Edwin and Godwine. It is likely that Northman is the same as Northman Miles ("Northman the knight") to whom King Æthelred II granted the village of Twywell in Northamptonshire in 1013 . Northman, according to the Chronicle of Crowland Abbey, the reliability of which is often doubted by historians, says he was a retainer (knight) of Eadric Streona, the Earl of Mercia. It adds that Northman had been killed upon Cnut's orders along with Eadric and others for this reason. Cnut "made Leofric ealdorman in place of his brother Northman, and afterwards held him in great affection."

Becoming Earl of Mercia made him one of the most powerful men in the land, second only to the ambitious Earl Godwin of Wessex, among the mighty earls. Leofric may have had some connection by marriage to Ælfgifu of Northampton, the first wife of Cnut, which might help to explain why he was the chief supporter of her son Harold Harefoot against Harthacnut, Cnut's son by Emma of Normandy, when Cnut died in 1035. However, Harold died in 1040 and was succeeded by his brother Harthacnut, who made himself unpopular by implementing heavy taxation during his short reign. Two of his tax-collectors were killed at Worcester by angry locals. The king was so enraged by this that in 1041 he ordered Leofric and his other earls to plunder and burn the city, and lay waste to the surrounding area. This command must have sorely tested Leofric, since Worcester was the cathedral city of the Hwicce, his people.

When Harthacnut died suddenly in 1042, he was succeeded by his half-brother Edward the Confessor. Leofric loyally supported Edward when Edward came under threat at Gloucester, from Earl Godwin, in 1051. Leofric and Earl Siward of Northumbria gathered a great army to meet that of Godwin. His advisors counseled Edward that battle would be folly, since there would be important members of the nobility on both sides; the loss of these men, should many die in battle, would leave England open to its enemies. So in the end the issue was resolved by less bloody means: Earl Godwin and his family were outlawed for a time. Earl Leofric's power was then at its height. But in 1055 Leofric's own son Ælfgar was outlawed, "without any fault", says the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Ælfgar raised an army in Ireland and Wales and brought it to Hereford, where he clashed with the army of Earl Ralph of Herefordshire and severely damaged the town. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle wryly comments "And then when they had done most harm, it was decided to reinstate Earl Ælfgar".

Leofric died in 1057 at his estate at Kings Bromley in Staffordshire. According to the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, he died on 30 September, but the chronicler of Worcester gives the date as 31 August. Both agree that he was buried at Coventry.[6] Leofric was succeeded by his son Ælfgar as earl.

Religious works. Earl Leofric and Godiva were noted for great generosity to religious houses. In 1043 he founded and endowed a Benedictine monastery at Coventry. John of Worcester tells us that "He and his wife, the noble Countess Godgifu, a worshipper of God and devout lover of St Mary ever-virgin, built the monastery there from the foundations out of their own patrimony, and endowed it adequately with lands and made it so rich in various ornaments that in no monastery in England might be found the abundance of gold, silver, gems and precious stones that was at that time in its possession."

In the 1050s Leofric and Godiva appear jointly as benefactors in a document granting land to the monastery of St Mary, Worcester, and the endowment of the minster at Stow St Mary, Lincolnshire. They are commemorated as benefactors of other monasteries as well, at Leominster, Chester, Much Wenlock, and Evesham.

Family Apart from Northman, killed in 1017, Leofric had at least two other brothers: Edwin was killed in battle by Gruffydd ap Llywelyn in 1039, and Godwine died some time before 1057.

Leofric may have married more than once. His famous wife Godiva survived him and may have been a second or later wife. Since there is some question about the date of marriage for Leofric and Godgifu (Godiva), it is not clear whether she was the mother of Ælfgar, Leofric's only known child. If Godiva was married to Earl Leofric later than about 1010, she could not have been the mother of Ælfgar.

Leofric used a double-headed eagle as his personal emblem, and this has been adopted by various units of the British Army as a symbol for Mercia.

Historians disagree extensively on the character of Leofric. Folklore tends to depict him as an unfeeling overlord who imposed over-taxation, whereas many historians object to this, and consider it as part of the Lady Godiva myth; they suggest that he was a strong and respected leader. There is also great disagreement over his reputation as a military leader: some historians believe Leofric to have been weak in this respect, but others go as far as to give him the title 'Hammer of the Welsh'.
Om Leofric III, earl of Mercia (Norsk)

Leofric Herre av Coventry. Jarl av Mercia

Jarl av Mercia fra c.1017-1057 En av de mektigste i landet på den tiden. Han innførte skatt og blir beskrevet som hensynsløs, men også en sterk og respektert leder. Hans rykte som en militær leder beskrives som svak, men andre vil ham tittelen 'Hammer av walisiske'.

Før han konverterte til kristendommen angrep. han ofte kirken

Jarl Leofric og Godiva var kjent for stor sjenerøsitet av religiøse hus. I 1043 grunnla og utstyrte et benediktinerkloster i Coventry. Florence av Worcester forteller oss at "han og hans kone, den edle grevinne Godgifu, tilbeder av Gud og hengiven elsker av St Mary stadig virgin, bygde klosteret av egne arv, og utrustet den tilstrekkelig med land og gjorde det så rik på ulike ornamenter at ingen kloster i England kan har så mye gull sølv, edelstener i sin besittelse.

Leofric makt var en del av grunnen til at kong Knuds sønn og etterkommere kunne beholde sin fars grep på Nord-Europa etter hans død i 1035. Han c døde i 1057 og ble gravlagt ved klosterkirken i Coventry

Leofric var gift med Godiva, De hadde sønnen Ælfgar, datteren Emmirhild og kanskje flere.

http://fabpedigree.com/s016/f072571.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leofric,_Earl_of_Mercia

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofwinedied1023A
 
Leofric III Earl of Mercia (I11080)
 
202 About Richard Sherburne

Married Agnes Harrington when he was 9 years old. He was a Knight of the Shire of Lancaster and is entombed in the Shireburne Chapel at All Hallows Church, Mitton commonly known as Mytton Church. He was given his mothers surname Shireburn rather than his fathers Bailey. Being of the Bailey line he was the 4th. great grandson of Otto de Mitton whos own family then began to use the surname Bailey after their manor granted to Otto de Mitton by his older brother Hugh de Mitton circa 1200. His son is the next Richard Shireburne and lived until 1494. He was married at 12 years old and lived at Stonyhurst. He is also entombed in this chapel. https://thefamilydemitton.wordpress.com/shireburne-shireburne-and-more-shireburnes/

Margaret Sherburne conveyed all her Shireburne estates and assets to her husband Richard Bayley (descendant of Ralph the Red) to be left to their only son and heir Richard. He was however given the more predominate surname Shireburne to perpetuate the mothers family name and secure the Shireburne inheritance. Margaret?s father in law John de Bailey (descendant Mitton) was the possessor of Stonyhurst at the time. He was the grandfather of Richard Shirburne. Richard Bailey, father of Richard Shireburne never had possession of Stoneyhurst. Richard Bailey died 3 years before his father and eventually his son Richard Shireburne inherited Stonyhurst directly from his grandfather John Bailey in 1391.

He built the aisle to Mitton Church and was the first of the Shireburns of Stonyhurst Hall. His effigy is at Mitton Church with his Shireburne family successors. https://thefamilydemitton.wordpress.com/the-baileys-and-the-shireburnes-are-all-de-mittons/  
SHERBURNE, Sir Richard Bayley (I10805)
 
203 About the same year that Thomas was born King Richard II was murdered andKing Henry IV was crowned. BEREHAM, Thomas (I432)
 
204 Acceded: Dunsley DE PERCY, Richard (I672075626)
 
205 Accidentally killed by a stag while hunting Richard Duke of Bernay (I41185)
 
206 accompanied Richard I to Palestine for the third Crusade, taking a distinguished part in the siege of Acre in 1187. He had been in the Holy Land for 15 years.He returned to England around 1201. As his son carried the same name there are confusions but a "Ralph St. Leger" was a signatory to Magna Carta in 1215. Stemmata Leodegaria. His tomb still exists in Ulcombe Church. ST LEGER, Ralph (I672075259)
 
207 Accompanied William the Conqueror to England and fought at the Battle of Hastings. DE ST LEGER, Ralph (I672075265)
 
208 According the book on the history of Jones Co, GA:

page 375 Reuben Roberts, b. 1759 in SC, died 1818, a Revolutionary War
soldier

page 674 Reuben Roberts, born Port Royal, VA, 1752, d. Nov 1845

According to the Rev War Pension files, Reuben Roberts filed for a pension
in 1833, and he states that he was born near Port Royal town, VA, in 1752, as
well as he can tell. He moved to Jones Co, GA, about 1807. His service was
in Kershaw District, SC. Since he filed for a pension in 1833, he apparently
didn't die in 1818. There is a DAR application showing that this Reuben
Roberts died 20 Nov 1843. There isn't any final payment in his pension file.
However, the DAR application shows two wives: Peggy Hudson and Mary Ann ??
There isn't any mention in the Jones Co, GA, history book about a wife named
Mary Ann.

There was a Reuben Roberts from NC; however, he married Mary (Milly)
Ashor/Asher in NC, and moved to TN where he died. He filed for a Pension in 1818,
and his widow then filed for a pension. Someone also joined the DAR on this
man's service.

The Rev War pension papers for both men have answers to letters written by
women who were most probably looking for ancestor information that would allow
them to join the DAR. If there is an inquiry answer to a letter included in
the pension file, it is always at the end of the pension listing. It is
often easier to read the letter than the actual pension since the letters are
normally typed, and the handwritten pensions have messy handwriting.

Phyllis Mistrot
20 Feb 2006
 
ROBERTS, Reuben Sr (I4266)
 
209 According to an account by Dr. Joseph Robertson HOOD, in a letter to one of his grandchildren: as of 1855, the widowed Mrs. Betsy (COPLAND) BAILEY resides on the "large, well-improved and very fine farm on Snake's Creek in Carroll Co, GA," including a large and extra-fine body of bottom land, which her husband has left her. The public road from Carrollton to Palmetto runs through this farm, and family members are buried in a graveyard near the residence. [Much of this bottom land is now evidently under a lake formed by damming Snake's Creek.] Mrs. BAILEY's son-in-law George W. ADERHOLD resides on the farm and will attend to her business for the remainder of her life [Betsey is apparently deceased by March 3, 1860, when George W. & Nancy Elizabeth (BAILEY) ADERHOLD sell her interest in land lots 61, 36, and 29 in the Fifth Land District in Carroll Co, GA, which N. Elizabeth had inherited].

 
ADERHOLD, George W (I671953498)
 
210 According to an account by Dr. Joseph Robertson HOOD, in a letter to one of his grandchildren: as of 1855, the widowed Mrs. Betsy (COPLAND) BAILEY resides on the "large, well-improved and very fine farm on Snake's Creek in Carroll Co, GA," including a large and extra-fine body of bottom land, which her husband has left her. The public road from Carrollton to Palmetto runs through this farm, and family members are buried in a graveyard near the residence. [Much of this bottom land is now evidently under a lake formed by damming Snake's Creek.] Mrs. BAILEY's son-in-law George W. ADERHOLD resides on the farm and will attend to her business for the remainder of her life [Betsey is apparently deceased by March 3, 1860, when George W. & Nancy Elizabeth (BAILEY) ADERHOLD sell her interest in land lots 61, 36, and 29 in the Fifth Land District in Carroll Co, GA, which N. Elizabeth had inherited].

 
BAILEY, Nancy Elizabeth (I40732)
 
211 According to Brandenberger Vol II, Thomas Duke came to Va in 1637 at or near the same time as Rev. Thomas Hampton. Both settled first in upper Norfolk County which later became Nansemond County before moving to James Citie County where Thomas Hampton took over a ministry. They both had grants in upper Norfolk. Hampton's first grant was in 1637 and the first to Thomas Duke was dated Aug 1638. Hampton left the area by 1640. Whereas Thomas Hampton obtained several land patents in his name only in James Citie Co., there was one land grant issued jointly to Hampton, clerke, and Thomas Duke. This patent, found amongst the records entered in William Byrd's Title Book, appears as follows: "Patent to Thomas Hampton, clerke, and Thomas Duke for 430 acres containing two necks of land lying on Warreny Creek on the east side of the Chihahominy River, James Citie County . . . . and due said Hampton and Duke by assignment of rights of transportation of nine persons to the colony by William Barret. Dated 6th of June, 1651 and signed by William Berkely.'" See VIRGINIA MAGAZINE OF HISTORY AND BIOLOGY, VOL XXXXX, P. 251 DUKE, Thomas , Sr. (I3684)
 
212 According to Burkes genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the landed gentry Volume 1:

The family of Cherry, formerly of Shottesbrooke, or more properly, as of old, Cherrie, of which there are several branches remaining, is of Norman origin, being, it is said, descended on the male side from the " De Cheries," seigneurs de Branvel, Villamara, Beauval, and Villencourt, &c., in Normandy, and on the female, from the Bretons, both families recognised in all the earlier "Recherches," or Visitations, as of the noblesse of Normandy.

A branch of the Cheries at an early period embraced the Huguenot doctrine, and in consequence of the religions persecutions carried on against that party, migrated and settled in England, where they afterwards became possessed of considerable estates. The estates and manors of Shottesbrooke, White Waltham, Smewins, Winsors, and Bray, in Berkshire, formed part of their possession: at the latter place a school was founded by one of this family, and endowed with lands for the education of twenty poor boys.

Of this family was FRANCIS CHERRY, celebrated by Hearne, the antiquary, (whose father was a domestic servant to the Cherrys, and who was himself brought up and educated at their expense,) as "the most accomplished gentleman of his day:" a fine portrait of him hangs in the picture gallery of the Bodleian Library in Oxford.

His father, William, was killed by the horses running away with his chariot, and overturning it at the moment when he had projected his head, whereby it was at once severed from the body. He allowed his son Francis 2500£ a-year during his own lifetime, an immense sum in those days.

"Francis," says a contemporary writer, "married soon after he was twenty, and his house, which at the Revolution made up seventy beds for officers and soldiers quartered upon him, was the hotel devoted to learning, to friendship, and to distress." Mr. Cherry concealed many celebrated Royalists at Shottesbrooke, and at White Waltham (another of his houses), the very learned Charles Leslie, whom he sent (without success) to convert the Pretender.

This FRANCIS CHERRY m. Elizabeth, eldest dau. and co-heiress of John Finch, Esq. of Frere Court, co. Berks, and was buried at Shottesbrooke, with this remarkable inscription only on his tomb, directed by himself: "Hicjaoet peccatorum maximus."
 
CHERRY, Francis (I41180)
 
213 According to Evelyn Brandenberger Duke, in 1745 they all moved to NC, Granville Cty, changed from Edgecombe Cnty in 1746. Edgecombe changed to Warren Cty in 1779 where Samuel had already moved by 1743 and owned land in New Bern, NC by Nov 10, 1743. DUKE, William Raleigh , Jr. (I3388)
 
214 According to Evelyn Brandenberger Duke, Samuel married possibly a daughter of William Green or Nathaniel Green. He had eight sons. the first 5 were born in Warren County NC, Sandy Creek Area. Later they moved to Franklin County in 1793; then to Kentucky after 1800; then back to Granville County; later to Orange County. Samuel Duke Jr. is listed in Franklin County and then Kentucky. William Duke is listed in Granville County then Orange County. Hardyman Duke is listed later in Orange County. DUKE, Samuel , Sr. Councillor (I3380)
 
215 According to family history, Nathan Fowler was born about 1747 in Virginia. Although one of his descendants wrote in her application for DAR membership that he moved to Georgia sometime before the Revolutionary War where he built a cabin "... near a spring on Long Creek", it is doubtful that he was in Georgia during the Revolution. The first record of his appearance in Georgia is in 1784 when he received a land grant in Washington County. A petition for a land grant was signed in his behalf by Rich (Richard) WIlkes (Bounty and Headright Petitions, Warrants, Certificates file, GA Surveyor General Dept., Office of the Secretary of State, Atlanta, GA). To that petition was attached a certificate signed by Colonel James McNeil, dated in Savannah on Feb. 9, 1784. Col. McNeil stated that, to his knowledge, Nathan Fowler could not "...be convicted of plundering or distressing the country.." and was entitled to a land grand (Ibid.). This was the terminology normally used on certificates issued to civilians not ex-soldiers. Unfortunately, the certificate issued by the governor, the only document in the grant process showing whether the applicant was a veteran or a civilian, is missing in this case. So, we do not know from the documents found to date if he was indeed a veteran of the Revolution. James McNeil held the civil, not military, rank of Lt. Colonel and was a representative for Richmond County to the Georgia State Assembly in Augusta. In that position he was selected as the Field Officer, or liaison officer, from the George State Assembly to the lower part of the county and given the rank of Lt. Colonel.

For Nathan Fowler's land grant in Washington County, a surveyor laid out 287 ½ acres on Fort Creek bounded on the South by Marshall, on the West by James Tannyhil and vacant on the other two sides. Later, he received a formal deed for the property, signed on 5/24/1786 by Governor Edward Telfair (GA Surveyor General Dept., Grant Book HHH p. 862). There is no indication that he ever lived there. Records show that the land was later sold at public sale to a speculator named Francis Willis, as was the practice for many bounty land grantees at that time ("Early Records of Georgia", Grace G. Davidson, P. 102). On Jan. 6, 1792, a deed was issued by Nathan Fowler to one Joel Resse for the sale of this property for 100 pounds sterling. It is not know if Nathan Fowler received any of the proceeds from the sale or if they all went to Francis Willis, the speculator.

Applicants for DAR membership have cited as proof of his service in Georgia during the Revolution the fact that Nathan Fowler's name appears on a Revolutionary War memorial on the Warren County Courthouse lawn commemorating those who served form the county in the war. However, the memorial is to all those who served in the Revolution whose graves are in Warren County. Warren County did not come into existence until 1793. The odds are that he served in the war from Virginia or the Carolinas, and, with so many other veterans from Virginia and the Carolinas, migrated south to Georgia for free or cheap land.

In 1784 Nathan Fowler also received a land grant of 400 acres on Long Creek in Wilkes County which was taxed the next year in Capt. Ledbetter's district as half 2nd quality and half 3rd quality land ("Index to the Headright and Bounty Grants of Georgia 1756 - 1909", Silas E. Lucas, Jr.). And on Feb. 6, 1786, he received a second grant (warrant #280) for 300 acres of land Long Creek which at the time did not have any adjoining landowners (Ibid.). The land was surveyed on Feb. 24, 1786 by James McCormick and Samuel Creswell. All four sides of the 300 acres were marked as "vacant"

BAPTIST, DONATED THE LAND FOR THE LONG CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH, WARREN CO., GA
(Research): Birth Sources:
Records of Angie Depenbrock
DAR Application of Nettie Lou Lorick
DAR Application of Nettie Loui Lorick, Nat #416300

Death Sources:
Jackson Co., GA - Early Court Records 1796 -1831, p 188
Jackson Co., GA WB-A, p. 66-67

Source: "Early Court Records, Jackson County, GA 1796-1831" p 188

Jackson County, GA - Early Court Records 17963 -1831, pg. 82

"Roster of the Revolution", Lucien Lamar Knight

Jackson County, GA - Will Book A - page 66

Surveyor General Grant Book HHH, Page 862

Warren Co., GA DB-B , p 80

Warren Country, GA Deed Book A

Jackson County, GA DB-F, p 354

Surveyor General Grant Book ZZZZ, p 444

Wilkes Co., GA Surveyor General Grant Book DDD, p 401

Survey for Wilkes County Land, Warrant #280 dated Feb. 6, 1786

Wilkes Co., GA Surveyor General Grant Book QQQ, page 116

Jackson County Tax Digest, 1797-1798-1799 and 1802, page 70 
FOWLER, Nathan (Rev) (I7749)
 
216 According to the Cornwall, Litchfield, CT Vital Records (Barbour) Abiah BIERCE married Lemuel JENNINGS 20 Jan 1773 by Rev. Hezekiah Gold. Recorded children were Benjamin, Mary, Wealthy and Hudson. Lemuel and family were in Cornwall through the 1810 census; by the 1810 census, sons Benjamin and Hudson are in Spencer, Tioga, NY (this area would become Danby, Tompkins, NY by early 1822). Lemuel JENNINGS and family were in Danby (then Tioga), Tompkins, NY by the 1820 census. Starr, page 434 mentions Abiah but cannot place her within the Cornwall families. If her age is indicated correctly in the 1810 census, she was born 1756-1774. The only Abiah that I can find who might fit in age is Abiah BEARSE, b. abt. 1752 to Austin (James/Abiah FORD; James/Experience HOWLAND; Austin) BEARSE and Hannah STETSON of Halifax, MA. Abiah had a brother, Austin BIERCE who died in Cornwall, Litchfield, CT (Ancestry gedcom). This makes her very interesting and promising. Could this Abiah have moved to Cornwall with her brother, Austin and be the Abiah who marries Lemuel JENNINGS in 1773?

2. Cornwall Vital Records indicate that Capt. Joseph (James/Mary BUMPAS; James/Abiah FORD; James/Experience HOWLAND; Austin) BIERCE and Elizabeth EMMONS had two sons named Erastus; Erastus b. 13 Oct 1776 and Erastus b. 21 Dec 1778. There are no entries to indicate so but it would seem that the first Erastus must have died for them to name another son Erastus; however another gedcom on Ancestry.com indicates that Erastus, b. 13 Oct 1776 resided in Danby, Tioga, NY in 1819. Joseph and Elizabeth had two sons; Joseph b. 8 Jan 1772 and Joseph, b. 25 Sep 1773. An Erastus BIERCE and a Joseph BIERCE appear in the 1820 census for Danby, Tioga, NY. Joseph is no longer in Danby by the 1830 census, however, Erastus is last noted as being in Danby in the 1840 census.

Erastus BIERCE and Lemuel and Abiah (BIERCE) JENNINGS are in Danby, NY by the 1820 census, as well as a Joseph BIERCE. I suspect but cannot prove that Erastus [and possibly Joseph] BIERCE and Abiah (BIERCE) JENNINGS were related simply because they moved from Cornwall, CT to Danby, NY roughly about the same time, and families did tend to move together. There is also evidence through wills at a later time that the BIERCE and JENNINGS families in Danby were connected through marriage. If Abiah, b. 1752, dau. of Austin and Hannah (STETSON) BIERCE is the Abiah who married Lemuel JENNINGS, she would have been a first cousin of Capt. Joseph BIERCE and a first cousin once removed to Erastus. Any help sorting this out will be greatly appreciated. 
JENNINGS, Lemuel (I3084)
 
217 According to the following Biography, this William Rush (c1635-1691/2),was transported in 1650 by Sir Thomas Huntsford, Bnt., [joining his father[2]]. Married Ann Grey (b after 1639). Their children: William, Elizabeth (m Jossua Hudson), and Mary (m Philip Peyton). Married Dorothy (widow of Christopher Thomas) in 1686.

Biography

In 1635, the immigrant William Rush arrived in America at age 20, aboard the ship Matthew of London.

A "young man of Dutch descent, whom Sir Thomas Luntsford brought over with Thomas Terrell, John and Lawrence Washington and others." Originally the Rush family were English Quakers.[1]
William Rush I, II, III, IV

Following is my working conjecture of the four generations, based on how dates and other information from various sources might fit together (see Research Notes, below for how I got here). ~ Liz Shifflett, April 1, 2016

William Rush (1615-1689 91/2), immigrant, arrived 1635, age 20, aboard the Mathew [left infant son in England[2]]. Acquired lands on the Machodeck river in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1644, as evidenced by deeds found at Montross, Westmorland County.[1]

William Rush (c1635-1691/2), transported in 1650 by Sir Thomas Huntsford, Bnt., [joining his father[2]]. Married Ann Grey (b after 1639). Their children: William, Elizabeth (m Jossua Hudson), and Mary (m Philip Peyton). Married Dorothy (widow of Christopher Thomas) in 1686.

William Rush (c1660-1707) m Elizabeth Perry
William Rush (before 1687 - not a minor when his father died)
Benjamin Rush (after 1687 - division of father's property indicated another son, but not named, indicating he was a minor), married Amy, widow of James Elkins

William Rush (before 1687-1735) married Mary; moved to what became Orange County, Virginia, where he died.

********************************************************** 
RUSH, William II (I671953252)
 
218 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. GILMER, E. (I5263)
 
219 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. PATE, D.C. (I5422)
 
220 Addresses:
Lived as caretaker of Albert PArk Lake in the Toll House on the corner of the entrance at South Melbourne.

I think Elsie and family left here when her husband died.

Elsie lived at 10 Tinning St, Brunswick in a house owned by her son Henry. She was living here at the time of her death (1966) 
LACY, Elsie May Bedell (I11315)
 
221 Adela became a nun, presumably after the death of her second husband.
 
CAPET, Adela (I41193)
 
222 After Joseph and Mary were married, they moved from Colchester CT to Whalely MA, where they resided from 1770 to 1777. They then moved to Rutland VT where they lived until February 1813, when they moved to Newfield MA, and lived with their son Joseph. Joseph served in Capt.Salmon White's company, and was discharged on August 19, 1777 after the Bennigton Alarm. Joseph also served in Col. Ezra May's regiment which fought at Saratoga from September 20 to October 14, 1777.

Facts about this person:

Fact 4
Served in Revolutionary War-Corporal MA

Fact 9 September 21, 1746
Hebron CT 
KELLOGG, Joseph (I5934)
 
223 After Lucy died, Asa settled in Galway, Saratoga County, New York, aboutthe time of the revolution; was a farmer; deacon in Presbyterian Church;Captain of the militia; Justice of the Peace, and was highly respected.

He was a Sergant in Captain Noble's Company, under Colonel Brown fromJune 29 to July 28, 1777; ordered into service by Brigadier GeneralFellows and Committee of Safety, by desire of Major General Schuyler. 
KELLOGG, Asa (I6971)
 
224 After the death of her husband, Mary Jones went through a long drawn-out court proceeding to settle his estate.

On April 26, 1803 Mary Jones was given a letter of administration by the Jackson County court for the estate of her husband, Thomas Jones. Thomas' brother, James, died only months later (Jackson County GA, Early Court Records, P. 140)

An inventory of his assets, which totaled $159.75, was filed with the court on May 6, 1803.

A year later, April 10, 1804, Mary filed an account of the estate sale with the court showing that it brought in $142.87 and ½ cent.

On April 23, 1804, following a formal complaing by George Weatherby, who must have had an interest in the Thomas Jones estate, the Jackson County court ordered Mary Jones to give an accounting of her administration of the estate, "...and particularly to show what disposition has been made with George Weatherbys bond for title to a certain tract of land, whereon she now lives" (op. cit., p. 147) George Weatherby was a lawyer and was probably involved in the disposition of Thomas Jones' estate. No record has been found of what action the court took on his complaint.

As administrator of Thomas' estate, Mary Jones filed an accounting with the court on Feb. 18, 1806 showing that she had paint out a total of $57.48 and ¾ cents to five claimants: Isaac Burson, David Dickson, Wright and Keys, George Reed Jr., and John Jones (GA Archives microfilm, drawer 168, roll 35).

In the next year, the business establishment of Tennille and Fort brought suit against Mary as administrator of Thoams' estate and on Sept. 27, 1807 a Special Jury found in their favor for $83.89 in damages and $12.12 and ½ cents in costs (Superior Court Petitions, 1807-1809, Jackson County, GA). We do not know what this suit was about.

It appears that sometime later Mary moved back to Warren County. On January 26, 1811, the minutes of the Long Creek Baptist Church show that a Mary Jones was "received by experience". Moving in with one of her children who stayed behind in Warren County would be a logical move for Mary Jones to make after the death of her husband. Which one? The Long Creek Church minutes show that a Mary P. Jones died Sept. 8, 1837 (or 1857). We do no know if this was Mary, the wife of Thomas, or Mary, the wife of James Jones.

Jackson County Georgia, Early Court Records 1796-1831, p. 140

Jackson County, GA - Early Court Records, p. 140

Jackson Co., GA - Early Court Records 1796-1831, p. 147

Superior Court Petitions, 1807-1809 Jackson Co., GA

Inventories, Appointments, Returns and Sales, Jackson County, GA 1800-1832, p. 133

Inventories, Appointments, Returns and Sales, Jackson County, GA 1800-1832, p. 134

Inventories, Appointments, Returns and Sales, Jackson County, GA 1800-1832, p. 135 
UNKNOWN, Mary (I7755)
 
225 Ag 6, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census. DOUGHTY, William A. (I9562)
 
226 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. SMELCER, M.B.". (I9619)
 
227 Age 1 month, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. Enumerated 20 Aug1870. DOUGHTY, Robert J. (I9490)
 
228 Age 1 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census.Age 10 on 1860 Macon Co., TN, census.Age 18, Barren county, KY, 1870 census. COOKSEY, John (I9584)
 
229 Age 1, McMinville, Warren county, TN, 1860 census. DOUGHTY, George (I9549)
 
230 Age 1, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census. COOKSEY, Mary B. (I9611)
 
231 Age 1, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census.Age 9, McMinville, Warren county, TN, 1860 census.Age 21, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census.Age 30, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census. Julia L. Doughty, age 7months, living with them.Birthdate is best guess based on census data.Marriage date is best guess based on census data and also birthof first child.Death date based on information obtained from masonic lodge.Names, dates, etc. for children based information from census,family members,and personal knowledge.Lemuel was always called "Lemon" and this name also appears onsome of hislegal documents. Confusion exists regarding the middle name;thiscompiler has never seen his middle name written - only theinitial "T".Our Aunt Ila Doughty Coe, his granddaughter, told us his namewas LemuelThomas or Thompson. We have seen no documentation using eithername.This Doughty family always traveled enmasse, with sons,daughters,grandchildren, nieces and nephews, following the lead of thefamily patriarch,Lorenzo D. Doughty, from Wilson County, Tennessee to WarrenCounty, Tennessee,to Izard County, Arkansas. Lorenzo Doughty died sometime inlate 1884 or early1885 in Izard County, Arkansas, and Lemon was named co-executorof his estatewith his older brother, James M. Doughty, of Newberg, Izard Co.Arkansas.We can't be sure of the exact date that Lemon and his familyleft IzardCounty, but it was probably soon after Lorenzo's death. Theymay have spentsome time with John and Lucinda (Hamilton) Hively, Nancy'sparents, before theyjourneyed to Latah, Idaho. They were in Moscow, Latah County,Idaho when theirdaughter, Jeffie Magnolia, was born in March, 1889. Theyreturned to IzardCounty, Arkansas, where their son, Henry Newton "Newt", was bornJune, 1891.They were in Texas for the birth of their sons Finis Kisiah inOctober, 1895,and Lemuel Guy in October 1897. They settled near Lemon'sbrother, Henry ClayDoughty, near Martha, Greer County, Texas. This area was laterin disputebetween Oklahoma and Texas. Oklahoma won the argument and GreerCounty, Texasbecame Greer County, Oklahoma Territory by an Act of Congress on4 May, 1896;after statehood in 1907, it became Greer, County Oklahoma.Jackson County, OK.was created from old Greer County in 1907, and Martha waslocated in that partof Greer which became Jackson County. DOUGHTY, Lemuel T. "Lemon" (I9516)
 
232 Age 1, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. DOUGHTY, Sarah (I9489)
 
233 Age 10 Tracy, Barren, KY 1880 Census.Age 28, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Sep 1871 COOKSEY, Dockter "Dock" J. (I9418)
 
234 Age 10, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Tabitha (I9641)
 
235 Age 10, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Sarah (I9649)
 
236 Age 11, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, Delia F. (I9609)
 
237 Age 11, Mountain Home, Baxter, AR, 1880 census. BREWER, Tenessee A. (I9555)
 
238 Age 11, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Lucinda (I9643)
 
239 Age 12 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census. COOKSEY, Pruciller (I9582)
 
240 Age 12, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census. DOUGHTY, Mary Elizabeth (I9548)
 
241 Age 12, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, Thomas E. (I9604)
 
242 Age 12, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Jan 1888 COOKSEY, Daniel (I9416)
 
243 Age 12, District 4, Mountain Home township, Baxter county, AR,1880 census. LYTLE, Josephine (I9633)
 
244 Age 12, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Mary (I9648)
 
245 Age 13, Barren county, KY, 1870 census.Age 24, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census.Age 46, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census.This could be Henry or Thomas, but do not know. He was livingnext door to James Henry in 1880 & 1900 census. COOKSEY, David (I9605)
 
246 Age 13, Mountain Home, Baxter, AR, 1880 census. BREWER, Robert L. (I9554)
 
247 Age 14, Barren county, KY, 1870 census. HarrietAge 22, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census. HarrietAge 45, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Hattie COOKSEY, Harriet "Hattie" M. (I9598)
 
248 Age 14, Barren county, KY, 1870 census. Living with James H. &Manervia. BYBEE, Julia A. (I9417)
 
249 Age 14, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census.Age 43, District 4, Mountain Home township, Baxter county, AR,1880 census.Received of J. M. and L. T. Doughty as executors of the Estateof the Late L. D. Doughty, deceased,forty five dollars and 20 cents this the 1 day of May, 1885. /s/Caroline LytleFeb the 18 1885. Received of L. T. Doughty, nine dollars in fullfor the crop made in 1885, belonging to the Estate of L. D.Doughty, deceased. /s/ Caroline Lytle DOUGHTY, Caroline (I9547)
 
250 Age 14, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Nancy (I9642)
 
251 Age 14, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census.Out of sequence in the census. NEWBY, Roland (I9647)
 
252 Age 15 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census. COOKSEY, Whaley (I9581)
 
253 Age 15, District 4, Mountain Home township, Baxter county, AR,1880 census. LYTLE, William (I9632)
 
254 Age 16 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census. COOKSEY, Jonathan Burges (I9580)
 
255 Age 16, 1860 Macon Co., TN census. EleanderAge 27, Barren county, KY, 1870 census. Ellen Chism?Age 32, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census. Living with mother & father. WidowAge 58, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Living withher widowed mother. Widow, 1,1. COOKSEY, Ellen Frances (I9599)
 
256 Age 16, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, James T. (I9608)
 
257 Age 17, ED #54, District 3, Metcalfe county, KY, 1900 census.Married 1, 0,0. Can't make out the month. UNKNOWN, Evie (I9576)
 
258 Age 17, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. DOUGHTY, Barron (I9486)
 
259 Age 18 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census. COOKSEY, William (I9585)
 
260 Age 18, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census.Age 38, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. DaughteryAge 46, Newberg, Izard, AR, 1880 census. Sarah Taightell, age20, TN, living with them. DOUGHTY, James M. (I9546)
 
261 Age 18, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, Jessie H. (I9603)
 
262 Age 18, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Johnathan (I9644)
 
263 Age 19, District 18, Smith, TN, 1880 census. GILL, Jodie L. (I9494)
 
264 Age 19, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, Samuel (I9607)
 
265 Age 19, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Married 11months. UNKNOWN, Laura (I9602)
 
266 Age 19, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, James (I9640)
 
267 Age 19, Summershade, Metcalfe, KY, 1900 census. Oct 1880,married less than a year, 1,1.Age 28, Metcalfe, KY, 1910 census.Age 50, Summershade, Metcalfe, KY, 1920 census. (Should bearound 38. Ode was head of house with wrong age, too.)Age 48, Clarks Hill, Lauramie, Tippecanoe, IN, 1930 census.WillieanWillie Anne was brought to the Gordon house in Concord, IN,about, a year before she passed away in 1944.Willian is on her tombstone. BYBEE, Willie Anne (I9572)
 
268 Age 2 Tracy, Barren, KY 1880 census. COOKSEY, Belia (Delia) A. (I9421)
 
269 Age 2, Barren county, KY, 1870 census.Age 31, ED #54, District 3, Metcalfe county, KY, 1900 census.Gravestone marked the name as Lusley COOKSEY, Lesley (I9415)
 
270 Age 2, Newberg, Izard, AR, 1880 census. DOUGHTY, Dora (I9561)
 
271 Age 2, Sugar Creek, Montgomery, IN, 1910 census.Age 12, Lauramie, Tippecanoe, IN, 1920 census.Age 22, Lauramie, Tippecanoe, IN, 1930 census. GORDON, Dale Edgar (I9658)
 
272 Age 20, District 18, Smith, TN, 1880 census. GILL, Windfield W. (I9493)
 
273 Age 20, District 4, Mountain Home township, Baxter county, AR,1880 census. LYTLE, Mattie (I9631)
 
274 Age 20, Perry, Clinton, IN, 1910 census.Age 32, Clarks Hill, Lauramie, Tippecanoe, IN, 1930 census. SMELCER, Dessie Adam (I9456)
 
275 Age 21, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Married 7months.Age 40, Tracy, Barren, KY, 1920 census. UNKNOWN, Mary H. (I9657)
 
276 Age 22, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Married 7,4,4. UNKNOWN, Emily J. (I9593)
 
277 Age 22, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census.Age 33, Newberg, Izard, AR, 1880 census. SHANNON, Mary C. W. (I9550)
 
278 Age 24, Barren county, KY, 1870 census.Age 36 Tracy, Barren, KY 1880 Census.Father & Mother born in TN.License name was Minerva Sexton. FRYE, Eliza Minerva [Liza Nerva] (I9413)
 
279 Age 25, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census.Nancy's unhappiness in Idaho was their reason for returning toArkansas, thenTexas (Oklahoma). She complained of no school, no church, noneighbors, andshe was afraid of the Indians (Aunt Ila Doughty Coe,granddaughter of Lemon andNancy). HIVELY, Nancy Ann (I9517)
 
280 Age 25, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. CatherineSister to Russell Brewer, who married Henry Clay's sister, SarahAnn Doughty.Member Methodist Church. Resided Tn., Ark., Tx.,Ind.Terr./Oklahoma. BREWER, Mary Catherine (I9488)
 
281 Age 28 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census.Age 36 on 1860 Macon Co., TN census.Age 58, Barren county, KY, 1870 census. RindaAge 60, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census.Age 79, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Widow UNKNOWN, Malinda (I9579)
 
282 Age 29, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census. Enumeratormust have erred, she should be 39.Age 48, McMinville, Warren county, TN, 1860 census.Age 58, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census.Age 68, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census. COOKSEY, Sarah (I9617)
 
283 Age 3, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, Letha (I9595)
 
284 Age 3, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census.Source says born 18 Sep 1875. DOUGHTY, James Archibald "Arch" (I9496)
 
285 Age 3, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census. LucindaAge 12, McMinville, Warren county, TN, 1860 census. LouizaAge 23, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census.Age 30, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census. LouesannSource says her name is Louisa. DOUGHTY, Louesann (I9483)
 
286 Age 3, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census.Age 13, Newberg, Izard, AR, 1880 census. DOUGHTY, Frances (I9559)
 
287 Age 30, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census. Verna F.Age 57, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Married28,6,5. UNKNOWN, Frances (I9606)
 
288 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. SMELCER, A.". (I9469)
 
289 Age 4, Barren county, KY, 1870 census.Age 14 Tracy, Barren, KY 1880 census.Age 33, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. COOKSEY, G.P. [Cornelius][Corneleus](Conilious) (I9414)
 
290 Age 4, District 12, Tracy township, Barren county, KY, 1880census. COOKSEY, Etha D. (I9610)
 
291 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. COOKSEY, B.M. (I9563)
 
292 Age 4, Mountain Home, Baxter, AR, 1880 census. BREWER, Cora (I9558)
 
293 Age 4, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Frances (I9646)
 
294 Age 4, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census. NEWBY, Louisa (I9652)
 
295 Age 4, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census.Age 12, 1860 Macon Co., TN census.Age 24, Barren county, KY, 1870 census.Age 33, Tracy, Barren, KY, 1880 census.Age 53, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Married 11months.Location of Cooksey cemetery. Take Roseville Road to CooktownRoad. Go through Cooktown to Pleasant Point Church Road[Armstrong Road]. Go .4 mile. The cemetery is .2 mile off theright side of the road and behind a barn. Possible date of deathwas 1903. Age 4 on 1850 Smith Co., TN, census. Age 12 on 1860Smith Co., TN, census. COOKSEY, James Henry [Tobe] (I9412)
 
296 Age 4, Tracy, Barren, KY, 1880 census.Age 22, District 2, Barren county, KY, 1900 census. Livingwith brother, Dock. Married 7 months. Nov 1877Age 44, Tracy, Barren, KY, 1820 census. COOKSEY, Oscar (Osker) F. (I9420)
 
297 Age 40, District 12, Wilson county, TN, 1850 census.Age 49, McMinville, Warren county, TN, 1860 census.Age 59, Union, Izard, AR, 1870 census. $700, $160.Age 69, Union, Izard, AR, 1880 census. Harrison Doughty, age22, living with them.WILSON COUNTY, ROLL 13DEED BOOK X, pp 167:168,116 Acres; $600.00[Tennessee State Archives]This indenture made and intend the 5th day of October in theyear 1847between CHARLES H. SPEARS of the State of Tennessee, SmithCounty, of theone part and L. D. DOUGHTY of the County of Wilson and Stateaforesaid ofthe other part, witnesseth that the said C. W. SPEARS for and inconsideration of the sum of Six Hundred Hundred Dollars to himpaid thereceipt whereof is acknowledged, hath bargained or sold andconveyed untothe said L. D. DOUGHTY his heirs and assigns forever a certaintract orparcel of land originally granted to JAMES DAVIDSON of 450 acresbeginningat a white walnut and ironwood, thence south eighty eight polesand a halfto a white walnut thence east 227 poles to two birches, thencenorth fiftyone and a half poles to an elm thence west fifty two poles to astake andelm and chinquepin oak, thence north thirty six and a half polesto a whiteash and Chinquepin oak, thence west 175 poles to the beginning,containingby estimation 116 acres to have and to hold the aforesaid landwith all therights, profits, hereditaments and appurtainances of the samebelonging tothe said L. D. DOUGHTY, his heirs and assigns forever and thesaid C. H.SPEARS for himself, his heirs and assigns the above [recited?]land, I willwarrant and defend against the right title interest or claim ofall andevery person or persons in witness whereof the said CHARLES H.SPEARS haththis day set his hand and seal the day and year above writtensigned,sealed and delivered in the presence of us.Charles H. Spear {SEAL}Test: ROLAND W. NEWBEYJAMES B. COOKSEYState of Tennessee, Wilson County } Personally appeared beforeme Josiah S.McClain, Clerk of the County Court of same county of Wilson,CHARLES H.SPEAR the within named bargainer with whom I am personallyacquainted withand who acknowledged that he executed the written deed for thepurposestherein contained. Witness my hand at office this 2nd day ofOctober, 1848.J. S. McCLAIN,ClerkRegistered October 3rd 1848A. W. VICK, Register of Wilson County, Transfer of RegistrationOctober5th 1848 at 4 o'clock p.m. fee $1.00A. W. VICK, RegisterofWilson CountySource: TN Library & Archives. Roll #194. Book 1843-1848, Page245.Type Record: InventoryJanuary Term 1846Final Inventory and List of Sales of the Estate of RobertDoughty, Decd. Sold 31st Oct 1845Henry Wheeler 1 Lard Stand, 1 Stand, 1 Chop Axe, 1 Spotorch, 1Smoothing IronHenry Wheeler 1 pail, 1 pr gear, 1 Loom, 1 Book, 1 Table, 1Bureau, +unreadableHenry Wheeler 1 Bed Stead & Furniture, 6 Chairs, One Jar.Jas. Bradley Bought 2 Barrels, 1 Churn, 1 Oven, 1 Coffee Mill, 1Cupboard, 1 ShovelPhillip Shares 1 Wheel, 1 Heifer, 1 Yearling, 1 Ox CartJoseph Mitchell 1 Filly, 1 Gray Filly, by Jesse Fuller; JosephFuller on Yoke [?this item?]Willis Miller 1 Handsaw, 7 Augers, 1 Hammer & Chisel, 1 LogChainWm. Tuggle 1 Tub, 1 set of gear, Meal Sifter, 1 Slay, 1 CoffeePot, 1 Spice BoxWm. Tuggle 80 bbls. Corn, 1 Pot, Lot of Sundries, 1 pairHarnessJno. Hearn 2 ?Reaphooks, 2 CalvesJoshua Wilson 1 Cutting Box & Knife & 1 Curry CombJonathan Bailey 1 Roan Colt, 1 pr Cords [Cards?]Richard Clark 1 ShovelJno. B. Shepard 1 Man's Saddle. 2- bbls Corn,James Spring 1 Lot SundriesJno. Bradshaw 1 Skiller, 1 Bed Cover, 1 Meal Bag, ?HenryBrown, 1 Iron WedgeJno Barber 2 Pr Door Hinges,David J. Cardwell 2 [sheep?], 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Lot SundriesAndrew Sky 1 Lot Tobacco,John H. Foust 1 [?], 1 Set of Spoons, 1 Side BoardJohn Stevens 1 Scythe & Cradle, 177 bbls Cotton, 2 [hacklers?],1 Reed? [Rud?], 1 ChairSam Bell 200 lbs CottonJ.J. Cunningham 1 Baskit, 1 Lot of Rough_ _ _ _ [Roughuess??]Gilbert Davis 1 CowThomas Kitchen A m. Cow and CalfAlexr Belcher 1 Chest,Benjn. Pnchell 1 Roan MareJno Smith 1 Bay HorseJohn Reece 1 Sausage StufferJohn Wheeler 10 bbls. CornJordan Kilgore 1 Pr Steelyards, 1 BedsteadHardin Raglin 1 HndleSaml. Hankins 1 Cow and CalfEnoch Gann 2 SteersJosh Owin 1 CowJas. P. Edwards 2 SowsLewis Manning 1 Sow, 10 bbl CornWm. Nunn 1 Lot Wheat & TubWm. Searcy 1 Lot Plank, 6 bushels Wheat, 1 barrel, 1 Lot Oats, 1Scythe HandleWm. Searcy 1 Cany? Plow, 1 Pr Shop ShearsHenry [Amugton?] 1 Wheat FanE.A. Wright 1 Pr Sheep Shares, 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Bridle CollarHenry Bradley 6 SheepSamuel McCleland 1 JugLucinda Doughty 1 PotWhaley Newby 2 PlowsRoland Newby 2 PlowsD.N. Estes 1 Stack Oats, to Hire of Woman and ChildJacob Thomason 600 Bundles of Fodder, 1 Cutting KnifePhillip Fisher To Hire of BoyEdward Lawrence 1 Grind StoneWm. Doughty 1 Bed & Furniture, 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Lot of Ware, 1Dish, 7 HogsL.D. Doughty 1 Jointer, 1 Boring Bitt, 1 Lot Sundries, 1Chopping AxL.D. Doughty 1 Pr Stretchers, 1 Pot, 1 Baker, 1 Lot of Soap &Vessels, 1 BibleL.D. Doughty 1 Book, 1 Sack & Potatoes, 1 Bed Cover, 1 Lot ofWare, 1 Tea PotL.D. Doughty 1 4 Cups & Saucers, 1 Candle Stick, 1 Jar, 1 Sow &Pigs, 1 Lot ?Stockers?L.D. Doughty All the Cotton in the Patch, 7 bbls & 1 BushelCorn, 17 bbls Short CornAlbert Arrington Bought Sheep1 Note on L.D. Doughty for $30.00, due 25 Dec 1845, with a?endit? 25 July 1845 $10.50. Bal $19.50The foregoing is a full and perfect account of the Sales of theproperty of Robert Doughty, decdby law directed to be Sold, which was sold on a c _______ oft______ _________s.State of Tennessee. Wilson County Court, January Term 1846 ...An Account of sales of theproperty of the estate of Robert Doughty decd was reported tocourt by his admr & ordered tobe recorded. Recorded: 12 January, 1846 J.L. McBlain,Clerk of the said courtDEED. WILSON CO. TN., District 12ROLL NO. 14, BOOK 2, pp 66:67Lorenzo D. DOUGHTY to William YOUNG[About 122 acs; $1400.00]I LORENZO D. DOUGHTY have this day bargained and sold and doherebytransfer and convey to WILLIAM YOUNG and his heirs and assignsforeverfor the consideration of One Thousand Four Hundred dollars to mepaida tract of land in the State of Tennessee, Wilson CountyDistrict 12on the waters of Dry fork of Round Lick Creek, being a part of atractof land Granted to JAMES DAVIDSON containing by estimation OneHundredand Twenty Two acres 149 poles be the same more or less andbounded asfollows beginning on a Chinquepin Oak on a branch in H. Z.BROWN'swest boundary thence west one hundred and fifty four and a halfpoles towhite walnut, thence south 40 degrees W. fifty poles to aSugartree, thencesouth fifty five poles to stake in DAVID YOUNG's north boundary,thenceeastwith said boundary two hundred and thirty nine poles to stakeDAVID YOUNG'snorth west corner, thence north fifty seven and a half poles toElm, thencewest fifty two poles to Stake, thence north thirty five poles tothebeginning. TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the same to the Said WILLIAMYOUNG that Iam lawfully seized of said land have a good right to convey itand that thesame is unencumbered. I do further covenant and bind myself, myheirs andassigns, and representatives to warrant and forever defend thetitle to theSaid land and every part thereof to the Said WILLIAM YOUNG, hisheirs andassigns against the lawful claims of all persons whatever This12th October1852.LORENZO D. DOUGHTYJacob Vantri--i ?James OakleyJames YoungClerk of the county court Said county of Wilson, LORENZO D.DOUGHTY, thewithin named bargainer, with whom I am personally acquainted,and that heacknowledged that he executed the within and for the purposesthereincontained. Witness my hand at office this 1st day of NovemberA.D. 1852J. I.McClain, ClerkRegistered November 1st 1852Received for Registration Nov 1st 1852 at 11 o'clock A.M.Fee $1.00 A. W. Vick, Registerof WilsonCounty==========================================================[Original Material in Poor Condition. Best Copy Available.]Certified Copy from Tennessee State Library and Archives.Back to Wilson Co. Deeds Index------------------------------------------------------------------------WILSON COUNTY DEEDROLL #14, BOOK 4, PAGE 560[Tennessee State Archives]I LORENZO DOUGHTY have this day bargained and sold and do herebytransfer and convey to WILLIAM B. GILL and his heirs for theconsideration of the sum of fifty eight dollars and fifty centsto me paid all my right title and interest in a tract of landbounded as follows Beginning at the said DOUGHTY's beginningcorner, thence south 38 poles with the said GILL's line to asugartree, thence 47 1/2 poles to a white walnut, thence west 34poles to the beginning, containing 4 acres, 3 roods and 21poles,to be same more or less to have and to hold all these untobelongingbelonging to the said WILLIAM B. GILL that I am lawfully seizedofsaid land, have a good right or title to convey. I do furtherconvenant to him, myself my heirs and representatives to warrantand forever defend the title to said land and every part thereofbelonging against all lawful claims whatever to the said WILLIAMB.GILL, his heirs and assigns this the 27th day of November, 1849.Lorenzo D. Doughtysigned, sealed and delivered in presence ofG. W. BrittleW. L. SwannJosiah L. McClain Clerk of the County of said county of Wilson,Lorenzo Doughty the within named bargainer with whom I ampersonallyacquainted and who acknowledged that he executed the within deedfor the purposes therein contained. Witness my hand at officethis28th day of June, 1852.June, 1852 J. L. McClain, ClerkRegistered June 29th 1852Received for Registration June 29th 1852 at 12 O'clock m.fee $1.00 A. W. Vick, RegisterofWilson CountyDEED. WILSON CO. TENNESSEERoll #11, Deed Book 5, pp 25:26Hezikiah Cartright & Nancy Cartright to Lorenzy D. Doughty[Tennessee State Archives]We HEZEKIAH CARTRIGHT and NANCY H. CARTRIGHT have this daybargainedand sold and do hereby transfer and convey to LORENZY DOUGHTYand hisheirs forever for the consideration of seventy-five dollars touspaid a tract of land in the state of Tennessee, Wilson CountyDistrictN, containing fifteen acres to the same acre or less, andbounded asfollows, beginning at the northeast corner of the tract of landknownby the name of ROGERS TRACT of land lying on Kitchens Creek ofRoundLick Creek, thence south 141 poles to the southeast corner ofthesame tract, thence west 18 poles to a stake in the west boundrylineof said tract, thence 18 poles to the beginning to have and tohold thesame to the said DOUGHTY, his heirs and assigns forever, we docovenantwith the said DOUGHTY that we are lawfully seized of said land,have aright to convey it and that the same is unencumbered; we dofurthercovenant and bind ourselves, our heirs and representatives towarrantand forever defend the title to the said land and every partthereof tothe said DOUGHTY and his heirs and assigns against the lawfulclaims ofall persons whatsoever, this 10th day of September, 1838.Hezekiah CartrightNancy CartrightW. P. DavidsonShelah WatersB. W. BellT. C. GrissomYou are hereby authorized and empowered to takethe examination of Nancy H. Cartright privately and apart fromherhusband relative to her free execution of the within deed andthe sameso taken to certify under your hand and seal. Witness Josiah S.McClainof the County Court of Wilson County at this office this 19thday ofSeptember, 1838.J.D. McClainhaving personally appeared before me and having by the authorityin mevested her, examined privately and apart from her husbandHezikiahCartright, and she having acknowledged the due executions of thewithindeed by her freely voluntarily without compulsion, constraintcoertionby her said husband, the same is therefore certified. Witness myhandand seal this 22nd day of September, 1838.Shelah Waters N.P. DOUGHTY, Lorenzo D. (I9637)
 
298 Age 40, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census.Sister of James Cooksey. COOKSEY, Lucy (I9615)
 
299 Age 42, South Division township, Smith county, TN, 1850 census.Source: TN Library & Archives. Roll #194. Book 1843-1848, Page245.Type Record: InventoryJanuary Term 1846Final Inventory and List of Sales of the Estate of RobertDoughty, Decd. Sold 31st Oct 1845Henry Wheeler 1 Lard Stand, 1 Stand, 1 Chop Axe, 1 Spotorch, 1Smoothing IronHenry Wheeler 1 pail, 1 pr gear, 1 Loom, 1 Book, 1 Table, 1Bureau, +unreadableHenry Wheeler 1 Bed Stead & Furniture, 6 Chairs, One Jar.Jas. Bradley Bought 2 Barrels, 1 Churn, 1 Oven, 1 Coffee Mill, 1Cupboard, 1 ShovelPhillip Shares 1 Wheel, 1 Heifer, 1 Yearling, 1 Ox CartJoseph Mitchell 1 Filly, 1 Gray Filly, by Jesse Fuller; JosephFuller on Yoke [?this item?]Willis Miller 1 Handsaw, 7 Augers, 1 Hammer & Chisel, 1 LogChainWm. Tuggle 1 Tub, 1 set of gear, Meal Sifter, 1 Slay, 1 CoffeePot, 1 Spice BoxWm. Tuggle 80 bbls. Corn, 1 Pot, Lot of Sundries, 1 pairHarnessJno. Hearn 2 ?Reaphooks, 2 CalvesJoshua Wilson 1 Cutting Box & Knife & 1 Curry CombJonathan Bailey 1 Roan Colt, 1 pr Cords [Cards?]Richard Clark 1 ShovelJno. B. Shepard 1 Man's Saddle. 2- bbls Corn,James Spring 1 Lot SundriesJno. Bradshaw 1 Skiller, 1 Bed Cover, 1 Meal Bag, ?HenryBrown, 1 Iron WedgeJno Barber 2 Pr Door Hinges,David J. Cardwell 2 [sheep?], 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Lot SundriesAndrew Sky 1 Lot Tobacco,John H. Foust 1 [?], 1 Set of Spoons, 1 Side BoardJohn Stevens 1 Scythe & Cradle, 177 bbls Cotton, 2 [hacklers?],1 Reed? [Rud?], 1 ChairSam Bell 200 lbs CottonJ.J. Cunningham 1 Baskit, 1 Lot of Rough_ _ _ _ [Roughuess??]Gilbert Davis 1 CowThomas Kitchen A m. Cow and CalfAlexr Belcher 1 Chest,Benjn. Pnchell 1 Roan MareJno Smith 1 Bay HorseJohn Reece 1 Sausage StufferJohn Wheeler 10 bbls. CornJordan Kilgore 1 Pr Steelyards, 1 BedsteadHardin Raglin 1 HndleSaml. Hankins 1 Cow and CalfEnoch Gann 2 SteersJosh Owin 1 CowJas. P. Edwards 2 SowsLewis Manning 1 Sow, 10 bbl CornWm. Nunn 1 Lot Wheat & TubWm. Searcy 1 Lot Plank, 6 bushels Wheat, 1 barrel, 1 Lot Oats, 1Scythe HandleWm. Searcy 1 Cany? Plow, 1 Pr Shop ShearsHenry [Amugton?] 1 Wheat FanE.A. Wright 1 Pr Sheep Shares, 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Bridle CollarHenry Bradley 6 SheepSamuel McCleland 1 JugLucinda Doughty 1 PotWhaley Newby 2 PlowsRoland Newby 2 PlowsD.N. Estes 1 Stack Oats, to Hire of Woman and ChildJacob Thomason 600 Bundles of Fodder, 1 Cutting KnifePhillip Fisher To Hire of BoyEdward Lawrence 1 Grind StoneWm. Doughty 1 Bed & Furniture, 1 Bed Quilt, 1 Lot of Ware, 1Dish, 7 HogsL.D. Doughty 1 Jointer, 1 Boring Bitt, 1 Lot Sundries, 1Chopping AxL.D. Doughty 1 Pr Stretchers, 1 Pot, 1 Baker, 1 Lot of Soap &Vessels, 1 BibleL.D. Doughty 1 Book, 1 Sack & Potatoes, 1 Bed Cover, 1 Lot ofWare, 1 Tea PotL.D. Doughty 1 4 Cups & Saucers, 1 Candle Stick, 1 Jar, 1 Sow &Pigs, 1 Lot ?Stockers?L.D. Doughty All the Cotton in the Patch, 7 bbls & 1 BushelCorn, 17 bbls Short CornAlbert Arrington Bought Sheep1 Note on L.D. Doughty for $30.00, due 25 Dec 1845, with a?endit? 25 July 1845 $10.50. Bal $19.50The foregoing is a full and perfect account of the Sales of theproperty of Robert Doughty, decdby law directed to be Sold, which was sold on a c _______ oft______ _________s.State of Tennessee. Wilson County Court, January Term 1846 ...An Account of sales of theproperty of the estate of Robert Doughty decd was reported tocourt by his admr & ordered tobe recorded. Recorded: 12 January, 1846 J.L. McBlain,Clerk of the said court NEWBY, Roland (Rowland) (I9639)
 
300 Age 43, Mountain Home, Baxter, AR, 1880 census.Civil War - Battle Missionary Ridge near Chattanooga, Tn.,wounded - captured.Lived Salem, Arkansas. House still there (1985) corner 3rd andMain.(Kay Brewer Rhodes, descendant). BREWER, Russell (I9553)
 

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