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101 MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY D, 30th REGIMENT
GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
ARMY OF TENNESSEE
C. S. A.
BIBB COUNTY, GEORGIA
HUGUENIN RIFLES

Jennings, William H. 3d Corporal September 25,1861 .

Appointed 2d Corporal in 1862 ; 5th Sergeant May 14,
1862 .

Captured at Nashville, Tenn. December 16,1864 .
Released at Camp Chase, O. June 12,1865 .

(Born in Bibb County, Ga. in 1844.)

This company left Camp Hardee near Savannah, Ga. for Jacksonville, Fla. October 4, 1862 , and returned October l5th.

Left Camp again, by order of Gen Mercer,
October 27th, for Coosawhatchie, S. C, and returned Nov 24,1862 .

Left Camp Young, Ga. December 14,1862 , and
arrived at Wilmington, N. C. December 19, 1862 .
 
JENNINGS, William H (I74)
 
102
Bruce died at 3 mos. of age 
FRY, Bruce (I122)
 
103
Jesse and Florence did not have any children

Facts about this person:

Fact 1 1936
Died

Fact 2
married: Florence Hope/ No Childred 
FRY, Jesse Alonzo (I132)
 
104
Maggie was counted in the 1900 Census in Carroll County, Georgia

Maggie is listed as being the mother of 9 children, 9 living. However, only 7 children are listed in the house in 1900. Eula (b. 1884) and Maggie (b. 1891) are not listed as living with them on the census. Also, Alpha C is listed as married and the mother of 1 living child, but the child and her husband are not listed on the census.
 
HANSON, Margaret Jane (I7411)
 
105
Much is not known of James. He married Rachel (Rae) unknown while in theU.S. Army, moved near
Sacrimento, Calif where they had a grove of Olive Trees. Rae was a nursein a near by Mental
Institution. They had one Child, believed to be named James, bd unknown.
Facts about this person:

Fact 1
Poss. ss# 436-10-0034 
FRY, James W. (I111)
 
106
Sources:

Title: Maude Harris Garner in letters to Thomas H. Dean, 1982-83: Maude Harris Garner is the wife o f Dean Garner,
Publication: descendant through Lemuel and Rebecca Dean Cherry
Text: Pulastki Co, GA, Minutes of the Court of Ordinary, July 3, 1837-51
Muscogee Co, GA Minutes of the Court of Ordinary 1840
Minute Book 1838-51 Ordinary Court, Muscogee Co, GA
Abstracts of Deaths Reported in the Columbus Enquirer 1832-1852
Burials and Deaths Reported in Columbus Enquirer 1832-1872, p. 84
Marriage license of Lemuel Cherry to Rebecca Dean, Houston Co, GA
1830 Houston Co Census
1850 Muscogee Co, GA Census
Houston Co, GA,and Bibb Co, GA, Marriages
1818 Pulaski Co, GA Tax List
1820 Pulaski Co, GA Census
Annual Returns of Administrators Pulaski Co, GA, GA Archives Drawer 38, Reel 28, pp. 317-322 , 355, 356
Title: Maude Harris Garner on Estate of George Cherry of Pulaski Co, GA
Text: Administrators: Lemuel Cherry and Isaac Holmes (also referred to as heir and legatee in Pulas ki County Minutes of the Court of Ordinary dated July 3, 1837
Division of Estate among heirs and legatees:
(Listed in this order) 1837-38

Lemuel Cherry
Mrs. Ruth Cherry (widow)
Robert Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry]
James Cherry
Issac Holmes [son-in-law]
William I Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry]
Emily Cherry [m. Henry Hornady]
W. C. Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry [Wyatt?]
Henry Mashburn [son-in-law]
M. C. Cherry [Listed on another page of the same record as Mary Ann C. Cherry; 1850 Muscoge e Co, GA census shows a Mary Ann Cherry, age 20, in the household of Elijah Dean, Sr.]

Guardian of minor orphans of George Cherry was Lemuel Cherry (Minutes of the Court of the Ord inay, Nov Term, 1840, page 69, Muscogee, GA):
George W. Cherry ["W" for Wyatt?]
William I Cherry
Robert Cherry
Title: Savell-Head-Curran-McDavid-Barrett-Acker-Sharp-Parker Family Tree: Dale Savell
Text: ID: I2661
Name: Isaac HOLMES
Sex: M
Note: LDS Microfiche & James Lloyd Head Descendants Book

Marriage 1 Louisa CHERRY
Married:
Children
Lucinda Florence HOLMES b: 6 JUL 1841 in Houston, GA

ID: I2660
Name: Lucinda Florence HOLMES
Sex: F
Birth: 6 JUL 1841 in Houston, GA
Death: 16 APR 1921 in Tampa, Hillsborough, FL
Burial: Lake Carroll Cem, Tampa, Hillsborough,FL
Note: LDS Microfiche & James Lloyd Head Descendants Book

Father: Isaac HOLMES
Mother: Louisa CHERRY

Marriage 1 James Joshua HEAD b: 16 MAR 1839 in Henry, GA
Married: 21 APR 1864 in Houston, GA
Children
Claudia Lenore HEAD b: 10 OCT 1865 in Houston, GA
Holmes HEAD b: 26 JUN 1868 in Clinch, GA
Callaway HEAD b: 18 MAY 1870 in Clinch, GA
Luneta HEAD b: 5 JAN 1873 in Headland, Henry, AL
Pearla Maud HEAD b: 20 MAR 1875 in Headland, Henry, AL
Constance Blanch HEAD b: 20 MAR 1877 in Headland, Henry, AL
Lena HEAD b: 16 FEB 1879 in Headland, Henry, AL
Leona Lloyd HEAD b: 16 FEB 1879 in Headland, Henry, AL
Title: Census for Isaac Holmes and Family
Text: 1850 United States Federal Census
about Lucinda Holmes
Name: Lucinda Holmes
Age: 9
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1841
Birth Place: Georgia
Gender: Female
Home in 1850(City,County,State): Graceville, Houston, Georgia
Household Members: Name Age
Isaac Holmes 46 1804 NC
Louisa Holmes 39 1811 NC
William Holmes 19 1831 GA
Robert Holmes 12 1838 GA
Penelope Holmes 11 1831 GA
Lucinda Holmes 9 1841 GA
Larry Holmes 5 1845 GA
Charles Holmes 2 1848 GA

1860 United States Federal Census
about Isaac Holmes
Name: Isaac Holmes
Age in 1860: 56
Birth Year: abt 1804
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: District 13, Houston, Georgia
Gender: Male
Isaac Holmes 56
Louisa Holmes 49
Penelope Holmes 18
Lucinda Holmes 17
Lancy Holmes 15 [Laney]
Charles Holmes 12

1870 United States Federal Census
about Robert Holmes
Name: Robert Holmes
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1838
Age in 1870: 32
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1870: Houston, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Perry
Robert Holmes 32
Julia F Holmes 25
Julia L Holmes 4
1870 United States Federal Census
about Charles Holmes
Name: Charles Holmes
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1848
Age in 1870: 22
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1870: Houston, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Perry
Household Members: Name Age
Charles Holmes 22
Eliza Holmes 20
Simon Dupre 35
Title: Allen and Higgins Genealogy
Publication: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pennyallen&id=I301289  
Family F565968083
 
107
About Lady Godiva

Godiva (or Godgifu) (fl. 1040-1080) was an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England in order to gain a remission of the oppressive toll imposed by her husband on his tenants. The name "Peeping Tom" for a voyeur comes from later versions of this legend in which a man named Tom watched her ride and was struck blind or dead."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Godiva

Lady Godiva Buckingham, an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman, was the beautiful wife of Leofric III, Earl of Mercia and lord of Coventry.; She is known to have persuaded her husband to found monasteries at Coventry and Stow. The people of Coventry were suffering grievously under the earl's oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would ride naked through the streets of the town. According to legend, she consented to ride naked through the town on a white horse; Lady Godiva took him at his word, and after issuing a proclamation that all persons should keep within doors or shut their windows, she rode through, clothed only in her long hair.; Only one person disobeyed her orders to remain indoors behind closed shutters; this man, a tailor known afterward as "Peeping Tom", bored a hole in his shutters that he might see Godiva pass and immediately became blind. Her husband kept his word and abolished the onerous taxes. The oldest form of this legend is in the 13th-century Flores Historiarum (Flowers of the Historians); A festival in her honor was instituted as part of Coventry Fair in 1678.The oldest form of the legend has Godiva passing through Coventry market from one end to the other while the people were assembled, attended only by two female (clothed) riders. This version is given in Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover (died 1236), a somewhat credulous collector of anecdotes, who quoted from an earlier writer. The still later story, with its episode of Peeping Tom, appeared first among 17th century chroniclers. Whether the Lady Godiva of this story is the Godiva or Godgifu ("gift of God") of history is undecided. Comment

Story: Lady Godiva

Godiva or Godgifu; was born about 1010, a sister of Thorold of Buckingham (Sheriff of Lincs.); she is the Lady Godiva of legend, and apparently is of an old, noble family. One correspondent claims her father was Earl of Lincolnshire.
Lady Godiva Buckingham, an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman, was the beautiful wife of Leofric III, Earl of Mercia and lord of Coventry.; She is known to have persuaded her husband to found monasteries at Coventry and Stow. The people of Coventry were suffering grievously under the earl's oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would ride naked through the streets of the town. According to legend, she consented to ride naked through the town on a white horse; Lady Godiva took him at his word, and after issuing a proclamation that all persons should keep within doors or shut their windows, she rode through, clothed only in her long hair.; Only one person disobeyed her orders to remain indoors behind closed shutters; this man, a tailor known afterward as "Peeping Tom", bored a hole in his shutters that he might see Godiva pass and immediately became blind. Her husband kept his word and abolished the onerous taxes. The oldest form of this legend is in the 13th-century Flores Historiarum (Flowers of the Historians); A festival in her honor was instituted as part of Coventry Fair in 1678.The oldest form of the legend has Godiva passing through Coventry market from one end to the other while the people were assembled, attended only by two female (clothed) riders. This version is given in Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover (died 1236), a somewhat credulous collector of anecdotes, who quoted from an earlier writer. The still later story, with its episode of Peeping Tom, appeared first among 17th century chroniclers. Whether the Lady Godiva of this story is the Godiva or Godgifu ("gift of God") of history is undecided. Comment

Story: Lady Godiva

Godiva or Godgifu; was born about 1010, a sister of Thorold of Buckingham (Sheriff of Lincs.); she is the Lady Godiva of legend, and apparently is of an old, noble family. One correspondent claims her father was Earl of Lincolnshire.

http://childsfamily.com/reunion/PS13/PS13_386.HTM

Om Lady Godiva (Norsk)

Godiva Hustru i Coventry til jarlen av Mercia

Godgifu eller med sitt mest kjente navn Godiva (ca. 990 ? 10. september 1067) var en angelsaksisk adelskvinne som i henhold til legenden red naken gjennom gatene i byen Coventry i England for å kunne be om at en urimelig skatt ble opphevet. Skatten var pålagt av hennes egen ektemann overfor dennes undersåtter. Det engelske begrepet «peeping Tom» for en som titter på nakne kvinner kommer fra denne hendelsen. I henhold til legenden var en mann ved navn Tom som så henne ri naken og ųyeblikkelig ble blind.

https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godiva

http://fabpedigree.com/s017/f072571.htm

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofwinedied1023A
 
Lady Godiva of Coventry (I11079)
 
108
About Sir Richard Sherburn, MP

Family and Education b. by 1522, 1st s. of Thomas Sherborn of Stonyhurst by Joan, da. of Sir John Towneley of Towneley. m. (1) 1538, Maud (d. 10 Nov. 1588), da. of Sir Richard Bold of Bold, 5s. 3da.; (2) 1588, Isabel Wood, 1s. 2da. illegit. bef. m., also 1s. illegit. by Grace Ryddynge. suc. fa. 22 Sept. 1536. Kntd. 11 May 1544.1

Offices Held

Dep. steward, duchy of Lancaster, Blackburn hundred, Lancs. 1543, steward and master forester, Bowland and Quernmore 1554-d., dep. master forester, Amounderness 1560-1 and 1586-7; commr. chantries, Lancs. 1552, 1554, eccles. causes, diocese of Chester 1562, to survey crown lands, Lancs. 1576, musters 1577, 1580; servant of earls of Derby by 1555, member, council by 1561; butler, Lancs. 1559; searcher, port of Liverpool 1559; lt. I.o.M. in 1561; j.p. Lancs. by 1564-83 or later; member eccles. comm. in 1568; clerk of the market and feodary, Bowland and Lancs. 1582; dep. lt. Lancs. by 1585-d.2

Biography Richard Sherborn?s father died in 1536 while sheriff of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Holcroft acquired Richard?s wardship in June 1538 and shortly afterwards married him to Maud Bold: guardian and ward were knighted together at Leith in 1544. By then Sherborn had already been involved in an attempt to overthrow the liberties of the town of Clitheroe, four miles from Stonyhurst. He had licence to enter on his lands without proof of age and without livery in February 1544 and in the same year he obtained Holcroft?s interest in the lease of Wigglesworth in Yorkshire, formerly in the possession of Sir Stephen Hamerton, and he was probably helped by his former guardian in the scramble for monastic lands. He purchased Wigglesworth and certain former properties of Whalley abbey for £712 in 1558.3

Of much greater significance in Sherborn?s career, however, was his connexion with the earls of Derby. He followed his father into their service and held many offices under the 3rd and 4th Earls; he was an executor of the 3rd Earl?s will and his son, another Richard, was to marry Catherine Stourton, whose mother was a Stanley. Sherborn?s parliamentary career mirrored this noble patronage. His election as first knight of the shire to Queen Mary?s first Parliament, when he had barely turned 30 and before he had taken any significant part in local administration, was a striking tribute both to his own standing with the 3rd Earl and to that magnate?s early and notable support of the new monarch; and even though he could not hope to retain so exalted a place?which would be occupied on the next three occasions by the earl?s younger son?Sherborn owed it to the same pervasive influence that he was to reappear in three subsequent Parliaments. In two of these he sat for Preston, a borough monopolized by nominees, and in the third for Liverpool, where Derby?s influence was especially strong: Sherborn was, indeed, styled on the return for Liverpool ?knight and steward to the noble earl Lord Edward Earl of Derby?. Nothing is known about Sherborn?s part in the work of the House.4

Sherborn was to continue in the Stanleys? service after 1558 but he did not sit in any Elizabethan Parliament, presumably because of his reservations about the Anglican settlement. In 1561 he was one of the members of Derby?s council who sat in judgment on a dispute at Liverpool; described in the municipal records as the earl?s chief councillor, he was said to be a friend of the town. He accompanied Derby on his visit there in 1566 and his name appears on the burgess roll in 1572 and 1589. In 1562 he was mentioned as having taken, as Derby?s officer, £80 in duties from a Portuguese shipowner. In 1578 he was acting as Lady Derby?s agent in a dispute over Neroche forest in Somerset. He was deputy to the 3rd and 4th Earls as master forester of Amounderness. In July 1555 the 3rd Earl had granted him to the custody of Greenhalgh castle and park, and in July 1567 the earl added the stewardships of Bolton in Lonsdale and of the wapentake of Ewcross with the master forestership of the chase of Ingleborough in Yorkshire. He was to have accompanied the 4th Earl to France in 1585 as his treasurer, but was apparently prevented by illness.5

Sherborn was more than a trusted servant of the Stanleys. If he served them as lieutenant of Man, he also served the crown as deputy lieutenant of Lancashire when the 4th Earl of Derby was lord lieutenant. He received so many insructions from the central authorities to inquire into local disputes that he has been called ?almost a special investigator?; one such dispute concerned Richard Houghton (probably the bastard son of Sir Richard Houghton) and Sir Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicesrter. In June 1563 Sherborn purchased the manor of Leagram from Dudley for £1,619; it had once been leased to his father Thomas and was closely connected with his stewardship of Bowland.6

If Sherborn?s religion did not exclude him from active local service, especially as a deputy lieutenant of his county at a time of threatened invasion, it does seem that his sympathies were Catholic. He was judged unfavourable as a justice of the peace in 1564 and in or about 1588 he was deleted as a Catholic and a generally obnoxious person. The accusations seem to have had no effect and Sherborn remained in office. He is even said, most implausibly, to have been so favoured by Elizabeth that he was allowed to maintain a priest. The earls of Derby could no doubt have protected him but they could scarcely have secured him the offices he held if his Catholic sympathies had been pronounced. Four years after being thought unfavourable as a justice he was a member of the ecclesiastical commission and in July 1568 sat in judgment on eight leading recusants at Lathom. In 1585 he was one of the signatories to a document on ?the enormities of the sabbath?, a document apparently of a Puritan nature although Sir Richard may have signed as one concerned rather with public order than with theology. Certainly there was no special significance in his signing the Lancashire Bond of Association. Shortly before Sherborn?s death his son?s second wife Anne, daughter of Henry Kighley and widow of Thomas Houghton, was summoned before the Privy Council as a recusant; on that occasion she conformed but the Sherborn family was later recusant. Sherborn had been one of those who reported on the affray in which Thomas Houghton was killed.7

Sherborn died on 26 July 1594, having made his will on the previous 2 Oct. Amongst the legatees was Richard, eldest son of his daughter Mary and Thomas Fleetwood, himself the son of John Fleetwood? of Penwortham. Sir Richard Shuttle-worth, chief justice of Chester and a Sherborn connexion by marriage, was supervisor of the will. A memorial in the church at Mitton lists several of Sherborn?s chief offices, but does not mention his having sat in Parliament. He had begun the rebuilding of his home before his death and the work was completed by his son Richard. The house passed into the ownership of the English College from Liege in 1794 and is now a Catholic public school.8

Ref Volumes: 1509-1558 Author: Alan Davidson Notes 1. Date of birth estimated from first reference, but said to be ten at fa.?s death. Vis. Lancs. (Chetham Soc. lxxxi), 58; (lxxxviii), 264; C. D. Sherborn, Sherborn Fam. 27 seq.; Chetham Soc. lx. 267; VCH Lancs. vii. 5. 2. VCH Lancs. ii. 97-98; vii. 5; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 280-1; 1572-5, p. 92; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 24; APC, xii. 8; xviii. 386; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; HMC Foljambe, 25; DKR, xliii. 274; Somerville, Duchy, i. 467n, 491, 501; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 402. 3. LP Hen. VIII, xiii, xix; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. xxxv. 171; DKR, xxxix. 559; CPR, 1554-5, p. 330; 1557-8, p. 174. 4. PCC 38 Daper; Liverpool Town Bks. ed. Twemlow, i. 52a. 5. Twemlow, i. 165, 169, 313; ii. 831, 838; APC, vii. 107; xi. 49; Chetham Soc. n.s. xix. 76; lxxii. 30; Lancs. and Cheshire Hist. Soc. xcii. 51, 53. 6. J. B. Watson, ?Lancs. gentry 1529-58? (London Univ. M.A. thesis, 1959), 478; APC, xi. 89, 163, 191; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 538, 581; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 2, 12, 27. 7. VCH Lancs. vii. 5, 131; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; CSP Dom. 1591-4, pp. 159-60, a document tentatively dated 1591 but see H. H. Leonard, ?Knights and knighthood in Tudor Engl.? (London Univ. Ph.D. thesis, 1970), 256n; Cath. Rec. Soc. iv. 178-9; J. Croston, Samlesbury, 104-5; J. S. Leatherbarrow, Lancs. Eliz. Recusants (Chetham Soc. n.s. cx), 27, 32, 99; Harl. 1926, f. 80; APC, xxiv. 281, 334, 410; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. lxxxviii. 45. 8. Chetham Soc. lx. 267; T. D. Whitaker, Whalley (3rd ed.), 467; Ducatus Lanc. i. 161; Pevsner, N. Lancs. 239-40.

Family and Education b. by 1522, 1st s. of Thomas Sherborn of Stonyhurst by Joan, da. of Sir John Towneley of Towneley. m. (1) 1538, Maud (d. 10 Nov. 1588), da. of Sir Richard Bold of Bold, 5s. 3da.; (2) 1588, Isabel Wood, 1s. 2da. illegit. bef. m., also 1s. illegit. by Grace Ryddynge. suc. fa. 22 Sept. 1536. Kntd. 11 May 1544.1

Offices Held

Dep. steward, duchy of Lancaster, Blackburn hundred, Lancs. 1543, steward and master forester, Bowland and Quernmore 1554-d., dep. master forester, Amounderness 1560-1 and 1586-7; commr. chantries, Lancs. 1552, 1554, eccles. causes, diocese of Chester 1562, to survey crown lands, Lancs. 1576, musters 1577, 1580; servant of earls of Derby by 1555, member, council by 1561; butler, Lancs. 1559; searcher, port of Liverpool 1559; lt. I.o.M. in 1561; j.p. Lancs. by 1564-83 or later; member eccles. comm. in 1568; clerk of the market and feodary, Bowland and Lancs. 1582; dep. lt. Lancs. by 1585-d.2

Biography Richard Sherborn?s father died in 1536 while sheriff of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Holcroft acquired Richard?s wardship in June 1538 and shortly afterwards married him to Maud Bold: guardian and ward were knighted together at Leith in 1544. By then Sherborn had already been involved in an attempt to overthrow the liberties of the town of Clitheroe, four miles from Stonyhurst. He had licence to enter on his lands without proof of age and without livery in February 1544 and in the same year he obtained Holcroft?s interest in the lease of Wigglesworth in Yorkshire, formerly in the possession of Sir Stephen Hamerton, and he was probably helped by his former guardian in the scramble for monastic lands. He purchased Wigglesworth and certain former properties of Whalley abbey for £712 in 1558.3

Of much greater significance in Sherborn?s career, however, was his connexion with the earls of Derby. He followed his father into their service and held many offices under the 3rd and 4th Earls; he was an executor of the 3rd Earl?s will and his son, another Richard, was to marry Catherine Stourton, whose mother was a Stanley. Sherborn?s parliamentary career mirrored this noble patronage. His election as first knight of the shire to Queen Mary?s first Parliament, when he had barely turned 30 and before he had taken any significant part in local administration, was a striking tribute both to his own standing with the 3rd Earl and to that magnate?s early and notable support of the new monarch; and even though he could not hope to retain so exalted a place?which would be occupied on the next three occasions by the earl?s younger son?Sherborn owed it to the same pervasive influence that he was to reappear in three subsequent Parliaments. In two of these he sat for Preston, a borough monopolized by nominees, and in the third for Liverpool, where Derby?s influence was especially strong: Sherborn was, indeed, styled on the return for Liverpool ?knight and steward to the noble earl Lord Edward Earl of Derby?. Nothing is known about Sherborn?s part in the work of the House.4

Sherborn was to continue in the Stanleys? service after 1558 but he did not sit in any Elizabethan Parliament, presumably because of his reservations about the Anglican settlement. In 1561 he was one of the members of Derby?s council who sat in judgment on a dispute at Liverpool; described in the municipal records as the earl?s chief councillor, he was said to be a friend of the town. He accompanied Derby on his visit there in 1566 and his name appears on the burgess roll in 1572 and 1589. In 1562 he was mentioned as having taken, as Derby?s officer, £80 in duties from a Portuguese shipowner. In 1578 he was acting as Lady Derby?s agent in a dispute over Neroche forest in Somerset. He was deputy to the 3rd and 4th Earls as master forester of Amounderness. In July 1555 the 3rd Earl had granted him to the custody of Greenhalgh castle and park, and in July 1567 the earl added the stewardships of Bolton in Lonsdale and of the wapentake of Ewcross with the master forestership of the chase of Ingleborough in Yorkshire. He was to have accompanied the 4th Earl to France in 1585 as his treasurer, but was apparently prevented by illness.5

Sherborn was more than a trusted servant of the Stanleys. If he served them as lieutenant of Man, he also served the crown as deputy lieutenant of Lancashire when the 4th Earl of Derby was lord lieutenant. He received so many insructions from the central authorities to inquire into local disputes that he has been called ?almost a special investigator?; one such dispute concerned Richard Houghton (probably the bastard son of Sir Richard Houghton) and Sir Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicesrter. In June 1563 Sherborn purchased the manor of Leagram from Dudley for £1,619; it had once been leased to his father Thomas and was closely connected with his stewardship of Bowland.6

If Sherborn?s religion did not exclude him from active local service, especially as a deputy lieutenant of his county at a time of threatened invasion, it does seem that his sympathies were Catholic. He was judged unfavourable as a justice of the peace in 1564 and in or about 1588 he was deleted as a Catholic and a generally obnoxious person. The accusations seem to have had no effect and Sherborn remained in office. He is even said, most implausibly, to have been so favoured by Elizabeth that he was allowed to maintain a priest. The earls of Derby could no doubt have protected him but they could scarcely have secured him the offices he held if his Catholic sympathies had been pronounced. Four years after being thought unfavourable as a justice he was a member of the ecclesiastical commission and in July 1568 sat in judgment on eight leading recusants at Lathom. In 1585 he was one of the signatories to a document on ?the enormities of the sabbath?, a document apparently of a Puritan nature although Sir Richard may have signed as one concerned rather with public order than with theology. Certainly there was no special significance in his signing the Lancashire Bond of Association. Shortly before Sherborn?s death his son?s second wife Anne, daughter of Henry Kighley and widow of Thomas Houghton, was summoned before the Privy Council as a recusant; on that occasion she conformed but the Sherborn family was later recusant. Sherborn had been one of those who reported on the affray in which Thomas Houghton was killed.7

Sherborn died on 26 July 1594, having made his will on the previous 2 Oct. Amongst the legatees was Richard, eldest son of his daughter Mary and Thomas Fleetwood, himself the son of John Fleetwood? of Penwortham. Sir Richard Shuttle-worth, chief justice of Chester and a Sherborn connexion by marriage, was supervisor of the will. A memorial in the church at Mitton lists several of Sherborn?s chief offices, but does not mention his having sat in Parliament. He had begun the rebuilding of his home before his death and the work was completed by his son Richard. The house passed into the ownership of the English College from Liege in 1794 and is now a Catholic public school.8

Ref Volumes: 1509-1558 Author: Alan Davidson Notes 1. Date of birth estimated from first reference, but said to be ten at fa.?s death. Vis. Lancs. (Chetham Soc. lxxxi), 58; (lxxxviii), 264; C. D. Sherborn, Sherborn Fam. 27 seq.; Chetham Soc. lx. 267; VCH Lancs. vii. 5. 2. VCH Lancs. ii. 97-98; vii. 5; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 280-1; 1572-5, p. 92; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 24; APC, xii. 8; xviii. 386; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; HMC Foljambe, 25; DKR, xliii. 274; Somerville, Duchy, i. 467n, 491, 501; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 402. 3. LP Hen. VIII, xiii, xix; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. xxxv. 171; DKR, xxxix. 559; CPR, 1554-5, p. 330; 1557-8, p. 174. 4. PCC 38 Daper; Liverpool Town Bks. ed. Twemlow, i. 52a. 5. Twemlow, i. 165, 169, 313; ii. 831, 838; APC, vii. 107; xi. 49; Chetham Soc. n.s. xix. 76; lxxii. 30; Lancs. and Cheshire Hist. Soc. xcii. 51, 53. 6. J. B. Watson, ?Lancs. gentry 1529-58? (London Univ. M.A. thesis, 1959), 478; APC, xi. 89, 163, 191; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 538, 581; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 2, 12, 27. 7. VCH Lancs. vii. 5, 131; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; CSP Dom. 1591-4, pp. 159-60, a document tentatively dated 1591 but see H. H. Leonard, ?Knights and knighthood in Tudor Engl.? (London Univ. Ph.D. thesis, 1970), 256n; Cath. Rec. Soc. iv. 178-9; J. Croston, Samlesbury, 104-5; J. S. Leatherbarrow, Lancs. Eliz. Recusants (Chetham Soc. n.s. cx), 27, 32, 99; Harl. 1926, f. 80; APC, xxiv. 281, 334, 410; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. lxxxviii. 45. 8. Chetham Soc. lx. 267; T. D. Whitaker, Whalley (3rd ed.), 467; Ducatus Lanc. i. 161; Pevsner, N. Lancs. 239-40.

Sir Richard Sherbourne, a knight and deputy lieutenant of Queen Elizabeth I.

 
SHERBURN, Richard (I7043)
 
109
About Thorold, Sheriff of Lincoln

CURATOR'S NOTES: The question of Thorold's position in a Mercian family and his relation to the Malet family has been much discussed, with varying theories, over the years. Based upon the work of Katherine Keats-Rohan, it is generally believed today that he was married to a daughter of William (Guillaume I) de Malet and was the father of Lucy "of Bolingbroke", later Countess of Chester, who was his heir. It is also postulated that he himself may have been the product of a marriage between a Mercian father and a Malet wife. He was likely the nephew of Godgifu, Lady Godiva of Coventry. He died not long before the Domesday Book (1086).

I put the foremost trust in Keats-Rohan's interpretations. Please see her essay, below.

Charles Cawley, author of the Medieval Lands Database, positions Lucy's parentage slightly differently, believing that Thorold was her uncle rather than her father. His research data reads:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3L-O.htm#GodgifuMLeofricMercia

Relatives of the Malet family, the exact connections have not yet been established:

1. [--- . According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol?qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[901]. The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained. m [--- de Lincoln, son of ---].]

2. [--- . m ---.] [Three] children:

a) THOROLD de Bukenhale (-after [1076/79]). Sheriff of Lincolnshire. The Annals of Peterborough record that ?Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivę comitissę Leycestrię? founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[902]. ?Thoroldus de Bukenhale?vicecomiti? donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names ?domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestrię et?comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea?et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hęredis eorum?[903]. Herman?s De miraculis sancti Eadmundi names ??Lincolniensis Turoldus?? among those present when Herfast Bishop of Thetford visited Baldwin Abbot of St Edmund?s to be cured of an injury to his eye, dated to [1076/79] by Round[904].

b) GODGIFU (-after [1054/57]). She is named as wife of Earl Leofric by Florence of Worcester, who specifies that she and her husband founded monasteries at Leominster, Wenlock, Chester and Stowe[905]. The Annals of Peterborough record that ?Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivę comitissę Leycestrię? founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[906]. Her family origin is also indicated by the undated charter under which ?Thoroldus de Bukenhale?vicecomiti? donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names ?domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestrię et?comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea?et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hęredis eorum?[907]. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Aediva trinepta Oslaci ducis" as wife of "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre", when recording that they were parents of "Herwardus"[908]. "Oslaci ducis" could be "Oslac" recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as "earl [of Northumbria]" in 966[909], but any precise relationship has not been identified. ?Leofricus comes?et conjux mea Godgyve? donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names ?frater meus Normannus?[910]. Godgifu wife of Leofric granted property to St Mary's, Stow by charter dated [1054/57][911]. Orderic Vitalis records that ?Elfgarus comes? had founded ?Coventrense c?nobium? and that ?Godiova...comitissa? donated ?omnem thesaurum suum? to the church[912]. She was the Lady Godiva of legend. m LEOFRIC Earl of Mercia, son of LEOFWINE Ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia (-Bromley 30 Oct 1057, bur Coventry).

c) [daughter . The source quoted below which names Thorold as "avunculus" of Lucy suggests that he was her maternal uncle, assuming that the word was used in its strict sense (which cannot be beyond doubt). m ---. It is unlikely that the sources quoted below, which name Lucy as daughter of "Algari comitis Leicestrię", are reliable. It is assumed that they all refer to Ęlfgar Earl of Mercia (see ANGLO-SAXON NOBILITY), which would mean that Lucy was the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar. However, such a relationship appears chronologically impossible, even if Lucy was born very late in the life of Earl Ęlfgar (whose death is dated to 1062), considering that she apparently had four children by her third husband who she married in 1098.] One child:

i) LUCY (-1138, bur Spalding). According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol?qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[913]. The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained. Domesday Descendants suggests that Thorold was her father[914]. Keats-Rohan expands her arguments in another article, based primarily on the presence of both Thorold and his wife as "antecessores" of Lucy and her first husband in the charter under which the couple donated Spalding monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas, Anjou (see below)[915]. The Complete Peerage also discusses whether Thorold could have been Lucy?s father and that her mother could have been the daughter of Guillaume [I] Malet[916]. An alternative origin is suggested by Ingulph's potentially spurious Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland, which records that William I King of England arranged the marriage of "Ivo Taillebois" and "Lucia sister of Edwin and Morcar", her dowry consisting of their land at Hoyland[917]. The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery also names ?Luciam postea comitissam? as daughter of ?Algarus tertius?, adding that she married firstly ?Yvoni Taylboys? by whom she was childless, secondly ?Rogero filio Geroldi Romara?, thirdly ?Ranulfo comiti Cestrię?, and was buried ?apud Spalding?[918]. The Chronicon Anglię Petriburgense records "Lucię comitissę?filię Algari comitis Leicestrię" as husband of "Ivo Tailbois comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldingię et totius Hollandię" and "Toraldus avunculus eiusdem Lucię"[919]. Lastly, the Annals of Peterborough name ?Yvo Taylboys, comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldynge et totius Holandię?maritus Lucię, filię Algari comitis Leicestrię? and "Toraldus avunculus?Lucię" when recording his donation to Spalding Monastery in 1074[920]. This relationship with Earls Edwin and Morcar is impossible from a chronological point of view, in particular because Lucy gave birth to children by her third husband at a time when she would have been over fifty if she has been their sister. It is also extremely unlikely that their sister would have been given a name derived from the Romance languages. ?Ivo Taleboys? donated Spalding Monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas Anjou, for ?conjugis suę Lucię et antecessorum Toraldi, scilicet uxoris eius, requie? by undated charter[921]. Peter of Blois's Continuation of the Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the death of Ivo and his burial at the priory of Spalding, and the remarriage of his widow "hardly had one month elapsed after his death" with "Roger de Romar the son Gerald de Romar"[922]. A manuscript recording the foundation of Spalding monastery records that ?Yvo Talboys? married "Thoroldo?hęrede Lucia" who, after the death of Ivo, married (in turn) "Rogerum filium Geroldi" and "comitem Cestrię Ranulphum"[923]. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "his wife the lady Lucia" married "Roger de Romar the son of Gerald de Romar" when "hardly had one month elapsed after the death" of her first husband "Ivo Taillebois"[924]. She is named as wife of Ranulf by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her first husband, but does not state her origin[925]. ?Ranulfus Meschinus Richerio Vicecomiti Karlioli? donated property for the foundation of Wetherhal priory, Cumberland, for the souls of ??mea et uxoris meę Lucię??, by undated charter[926]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Lucia comitissa Cestr?tra patis sui" in Lincolnshire[927]. ?Lucia cometissa? donated ?manerium de Spallingis...cum quibus melius tenui et liberalius tempore Ivonis de Thallebos et Rogeri filii Geroldi et cometis Rannulfi? by charter dated to [1135][928]. m firstly as his second wife, IVO Taillebois Lord of Kendal, son of --- (-after 1094, bur Spalding). ?Ivo Talliebois? donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of ?uxoris meę Lucię?, by undated charter witnessed by ?Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois??[929]. m secondly (after 1094) ROGER FitzGerold, son of GEROLD "Miles Christi" Chātelain de Neufmarché & his wife Aubreye (-[1096/98]). m thirdly (1098) RANULF "Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Maud] d'Avranches (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh). He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 and Earl of Chester.

-=
= http://users.ox.ac.uk/~prosop/prosopon/issue2-2.pdf

Prosopon Newsletter, 2 (May 1995)

"A lot of ink has flowed on the subject, but there can be no doubt that the ?mysterious? Countess Lucy of Chester was William Malet?s thrice-married granddaughter, the daughter of Robert Malet?s sister and Turold the Sheriff of Lincoln (dead by 1079).1 The suggestion was first made by R. Kirk in 1888.2 As N. Sumner has more recently observed: ?This account has the merit of explaining why the lordship of Spalding and other places in Lincolnshire were held after Ivo?s death not by Beatrice, his direct heir and the daughter of his marriage to Lucy,3 but by the later husbands of Lucy, Roger fitz Gerold and Ranulph Meschines.?4 It is clear from her charters that Lucy was an heiress; as was to be expected, her estates passed to the sons of her second and third marriages. Kirk?s work was based upon conjecture, and contained a number of errors. The question of Lucy?s parentage has therefore remained open. Nevertheless, there is proof that Kirk was right.....

A spurious charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (the Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva?s son Earl Algar as Turold?s cognatus (cousin).5 A genealogia fundatoris of Coventry Abbey made Lucy a daughter of Earl Algar and sister and heiress of earls Edwin and Morcar.6 The Peterborough Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf?s Chronicle of Crowland both made Lucy the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold.7 We know that William Malet was half-English, so these traditions probably boil down to a relationship between Countess Godiva and William?s English mother.

In 1153 a charter [RRAN iii, 180] of the future Henry II for Lucy?s son Ranulf II of Chester referred to her uncles Robert Malet and Alan of Lincoln. Alan of Lincoln was the successor, and almost certainly the son, of Domesday?s Alfred of Lincoln. Chronologically, it is most unlikely that Alan was Lucy?s uncle. It was probably another of Alfred?s sons whom Domesday described as Alfred nepos [nephew or grandson] of Turold, then holding a fee which was certainly thereafter held with the rest of the senior Alfred?s fee by his heir Alan. Domesday provides a further indication that Alfred senior married another of William Malet?s daughters when it names a William as Alfred?s predecessor in two of his manors.8 Other parts of each of these manors (Linwood and Rothwell) were held in 1086 by Durand Malet, who was probably William?s son. It seems that Henry?s charter can be explained by seeing a scribe, perhaps in search of rhetorical balance, commit the error of ascribing two uncles to Lucy, instead of a niece (Lucy) and a nephew (Alan of Lincoln) to Robert Malet, who was uncle to both.

Turold is evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknall.9 The abbey also held land at Spalding that had probably been granted to it by Earl Algar and there is evidence to suggest that Turold the Sheriff gave further land there to the abbey of St Nicholas, Angers, before 1079.10 Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois subsequently founded, or perhaps re-founded, a priory at Spalding subject to St. Nicholas, Angers. A revealing phrase from the Register of Spalding Priory reads: ?mortuo quia dicto Thoraldo relicta sibi herede Lucia predicta? [at his death Turold left an heir, the aforesaid Lucy].11 The word heres, ?heir?, was often used of the child who was to inherit his/her father?s property. Lucy later confirmed the gifts of all three of her husbands: ?pro redempcione anime patris mei et matris mee et dominorum meorum et parentum meorum? [for the souls of my father and mother, my husbands and my (other) relatives].12 The association of the priory with such a small group of people and the description of Lucy as heres of Turold strongly hint at Lucy?s parentage. But we can go further still.

In their initial benefaction Ivo and Lucy referred to ?antecessorum suorum13 Turoldi scilicet uxorisque eius regine? [our ?ancestors? Turold and his wife].14 The reference to Turold?s wife indicates that some part of his landholding had come to him through his wife, something also indicated by the occurrence of William Malet amongst those who had held the Domesday lands of Lucy?s first husband Ivo Taillebois before him.15 The apparently vague Latin words antecessor and predecessor can both be used to mean something like ?predecessor?. Each of them conveys a range of very precise meanings in different circumstances. The description of Turold and his wife as antecessores of Ivo and Lucy may be compared to the usage in a charter in the cartulary of Mont-Saint-Michel by which the Angevins Hugh Chalibot and his wife confirmed the grants of her father, who was described as antecessor noster.16 Other examples of this phrase show clearly that it was used by a married man to describe the parent from whom his wife had inherited the property she brought to the marriage. Acting on her own account (normally after her husband?s death), the heiress will often describe herself as the daughter of the parent her husband described as antecessor noster. A rare use of the phrase was to indicate the couple?s immediate predecessor, not her father but her brother.17 In Lucy and Ivo?s case the plurality of their antecessores, Turold and his wife, puts the matter beyond doubt. Lucy?s parents were indeed Turold the Sheriff and a daughter of William Malet.

NOTES

1 See Round, Feudal England, pp. 255-6; Complete Peerage, ed. G.E.C., 13 vols., (1910-59) vol. vii, App. J, 743-6.

2 R.E.G. Kirk, ?The Countess Lucy: Singular or Plural??, Genealogist, n.s. 5, 60-75, 131-44, 153-73.

3 Beatrice (who bore the name of Robert Malet?s sister) married Ribald, half-brother of Count Alan; Monasticon Anglicanum, ed. W.Dugdale, new edition, 6 vols. (1817-30), iii, 553, no. xx. For their descendants see Rev.H.C. Fitz Herbert, ?An original pedigree of Tailbois and Neville?, The Genealogist, n.s. iii, 31. Clay thought Beatrice was probably illegitimate (see Early Yorkshire Charters, v. p.291).

4 N. Sumner, ?The Countess Lucy?s Priory? The Early History of Spalding Priory and its Estates?, Reading Medieval Studies 13 (1988), 81-103, here, 84.

5 Monasticon Anglicanum ii, 118-19.

6 Ibid., ii, 192.

7 See Complete Peerage, vii, App. J, 743-6, here 745 and note.

8 Domesday Book, fol. 357d.

9 Domesday Book, fol. 346d.

10 Domesday Book, fol. 346d; see N. Sumner, ?The Countess Lucy?s priory??, 83-4 and n.12.

11 B.M. Add. 35296, fol. 2r.

12 B.M. Add. 35296, fol. 9r.

13 suorum, ?their? in the Register would have been nostrorum, ?our?, in the original charter.

14 B.N. Coll. Anjou-Touraine 3, no. 876 (Saint-Nicholas d?Angers), and B.M. Add. 35296 (Spalding), though both later copies, agree upon this wording.

15 Monasticon Anglicanum, ii, p.220, nos. v and viii.

16 Bibliothčque de la Ville d?Avranches, ms 210, fol. 104r-v. I am preparing an edition of this cartulary.

17 Red Book of the Exchequer, ed. H. Hall, 3 vols (Rolls Series, 1896), i, 368.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln1 d. before 1079

Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln was related to Lucy "the Countess" of Lincoln; per the Peterborough Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf's Chronicle of Crowland, the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold.1 Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln was evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknell.1 He was cognatus, or cousin, of Earl Algar of Mercia, son of Lady Godiva.2 He married N. N. Malet, daughter of Willelm Malet, seigneur de Graville and Elise Crespin.1 Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln gave further land in Bucknell to the abbey of St Nicholas before 1079 at Angers.1 He died before 1079.1

Family N. N. Malet Child

* Lucy "the Countess" of Lincoln+ b. c 10661,3

Citations

1. [S936] K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Parentage of Countess Lucy". 2. [S936] K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Parentage of Countess Lucy", A spurious charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (the Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva's son Earl Algar as Turold's cognatus (cousin).. 3. [S1032] K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, Iuo Tillebois, pg. 283.

Turold Sheriff of Lincolnshire 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 1020 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. He died Dec 1085 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. Turold married N.N. MALET on 1068 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.

N.N. MALET [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1046 in Graville-Sainte-Honorine, Seine-Maritime, France. She married Turold Sheriff of Lincolnshire on 1068 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.

They had the following children:

F i Lucy Countess of Chester was born 1069 and died 1138.

Sources:

1Keats-Rohan, K. S. B., "Antecessor Noster: The Parentage of Countess Lucy Made Plain," Prosopon, No. 2 (May 1995), p. 1, Linacre College.

2Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 176A-2, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

3Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066-1166 (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999.), p. 283, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 942.02 K25.

4Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People, pp. 1137-8.

Notes and Queries, Oxford Journals.[NEED MORE SPECIFIC SOURCE] from http://adupree.com/wp/g/getperson.php?personID=I6351&tree=adupree

There is other presumptive evidence of the connexion of William Malet with England previous to the eventful expedition. He had Blood cosponsor with Harold himself, and therefore, as being likely to recognize the body of the king after the fataal battle, was entrusted by the conqueror with the painful duty of finding and giving it burial. He who undertook this office is described in Bishop Guy's poem as "quidam partim Normannus et Anglus." William Malet was therefore nn Anglo-Norman of mixed blood. It was doubtless his mother who was English; and I would suggest that it may have been she who was the sister (rather daughter) of Earl Leofric, through whom the Norman Earls of Chester subsequently claimed descent from the Anglo-o-Saxon Earls, though the connexion was clearly misstated. It was alleged in pleadings in the reign of Richard II. that her name was Eormenhild, which is not an unlikely one, being that of the mother of St. Werburgh, whose abbey at Chester was iin the patronage of Earl Leofric, and after of the Norman counts palatine (Mon. Angl. i. 305). Burton, in his Description of Leicestershire, 1622 (p. 168), made Earl Algar marry William Malet's sister. This was adopted by Ormerod {Hist. Cheshire, i. 47), though daughter would have been better. Ivo Tailbois gave Spalding to the monks of Angers for the souls of himself, of his wife Lucy, " and of the ancestors of Thorold the sheriff, that is to say (those) of hit wife" (Mon. Angl.,'\. 307). Lucy was, therefore,, descended collaterally from Thorold. Godgifu, the wife of Earl Leofric, was Thorold's sister, and in all probability Lucy's own ancestress ? greatgrandmother according to these suggestions, which I find dates will allow. It, however, does not follow, and Lucy might have had for her father Alured nepos Thoroldi, son, perhaps, of Wigot of Lincoln by another sister of Thorold, and for her mother a daughter of William Malet. A son of the Countess Godgifu might have been called "nephew (which nepos generally means in Domesday Book) of Thorold," as his adopted heir; but this is a suggestion merely, not supported by anything in the Survey or elsewhere. In Domesday Book (ii. fo. 304, 6) is the remarkable statatement concerning a manor in Hemingstone, in Suffolk, in the barony of Robert Malet, that "Leuric [t.«., Leofric], antecessor [t.«., predecessor] of the mother of Robert, held it" in the time of King Edward. We have not evidence to enable us to say whether there is not some misstatement here, or whether it is anything more than a coincidence, and Earl Leofric may not have been intended, but it is curious.

This excerpt suggests that Thorold is an ancestor not father of Lucy.
http://opendomesday.org/place/TF2422/spalding/

Place: Spalding
Hundred: Elloe
Area: Holland
County: Lincolnshire
Total population: 91 households (very large).
Total tax assessed: 12.4 geld units (very large).

Spalding appears in 3 entries in Domesday Book.

? ENTRY 1 ?
Head of manor: Spalding.
Taxable units: Taxable value 9 geld units. Payments of 2.5 miscellaneous.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £23.1. Value to lord in 1086 £30.
Households: 40 villagers. 33 smallholders.
Ploughland: 9 ploughlands (land for). 4 lord's plough teams. 13 men's plough teams.
Other resources: 6 fisheries. 2 salthouses.
Lord in 1066: Earl Algar.
Lord in 1086: Ivo Tallboys.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Ivo Tallboys.
Phillimore reference: 14,97

? ENTRY 2 ?

Head of manor: Crowland.
Taxable units: Taxable value 2 geld units.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £1. Value to lord in 1086 £1.
Households: 7 villagers. 4 smallholders.
Ploughland: 1.5 ploughland (land for). 3 men's plough teams.
Lord in 1066: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Lord in 1086: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Phillimore reference: 11,2

? ENTRY 3 ?

Taxable units: Taxable value 1.4 geld units. Payments of 0.01 salt-houses.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £2. Value to lord in 1086 £2.
Households: 5 villagers. 2 smallholders.
Ploughland: 1 lord's plough teams. 1 men's plough teams.
Other resources: 2 salthouses.
Lord in 1066: Aethelstan (son of Godram).
Lord in 1086: Guy of Craon.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Guy of Craon.
Phillimore reference: 57,54 
THOROLD Sheriff of Lincoln (I11006)
 
110
Henry de Lacy ? the son of Robert (1) and brother of Ilbert (2)

Henry de Lacy (1) was probably the third son of Robert de Lacy (1). He inherited the de Lacy lands after his brother Ilbert died without an heir.

It seems that Henry de Lacy continued to support King Stephen but he received pardons when Henry II (the son of Matilda) came to the throne. One of these pardons was witnessed by the Empress Matilda and it restored his father?s lands to him and pardoned him for anything he had done before he paid homage to Henry II.

Henry built a timber castle at Selby around 1143 probably to protect not only his own estates on their weakest side but the town and abbey of Selby as well. The abbot at the time, Elias Paynel, was a relative of the de Lacy family and the de Lacy estates came with two miles of Selby. Selby castle was besieged within a week of its commencement by an Earl William who was at war with Henry. He may have been William of Roumare (earl of Lincoln) or William of Aumale (earl of York) or William earl of Warenne (holder of Conisbrough, Wakefield and Dewsbury). All three were neighbours to Henry de Lacy and whichever one it was may have been fighting in league with Guy de Laval who had a claim on the honour of Pontefract because the lands had previously been given to his family during the exile of the de Lacy family. The town of Selby was sacked and burned and even though the castle held out for a few days longer it was surrendered. Henry also built castles at Almondbury and Barwick with permission from King Stephen, creating a good ring of protection around the honour which was necessary as he was also troubled by a private war with Gilbert de Gaunt (who became earl of Lincoln and was the brother of Ilbert?s wife Alice).

When Henry de Lacy fell ill he vowed that if he recovered he would found a religious house. When he was well again he gave land at Barnoldswick to the mother house of the Cistercian order at Fountains Abbey for them to establish a daughter house there, but the site proved unsuitable and on 19th May 1152 the monks moved to a new site at Kirkstall. The land belonged to William Peitevin, who held it of Henry de Lacy, but it is Henry who is recorded in the foundation history as being the driving force behind William?s grant of this land to the monks.
Kirkstall Abbey

Henry de Lacy went on crusade to the Holy Land on two separate occasions. The first time was around 1158. He was exempted from taxation that year, but was back in England for the dedication of the new church at Pontefract priory in 1159. In 1165 he was with the king on his Welsh expedition and took along a large retinue. He was also with the king in Normandy in 1173.

At Easter 1177 he left for Jerusalem for a second time in the company of the earl of Essex and the count of Flanders and at this time he also witnessed the award made by Henry II between Alphonso, king of Castile, and Sancho, king of Navarre.

Henry de Lacy died on crusade on 25th September 1177, but how and where is not known. Whether his remains were brought back for burial at Kirkstall abbey is unclear.

Henry was married to the sister of William de Vesci, lord of Alnwick. They had one known son named Robert de Lacy (2) who inherited the lands. 
DE LACY, Henry (I10840)
 
111
https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/joseph-white_16944247

Born in Ireland, Pennsylvania, USA on 1709 to Moses White and Eleanor Lawson. Joseph married Margaret Leeth and had 13 children. Joseph married Averilla Harper. He passed away on Apr 1808 in Anson, Union, North Carolina, USA.

Children
David White 1738-1809
Joseph White 1745-1804
John White 1738-Unknown
James White 1739-Unknown
Mary White 1737-1757
George White 1741-1830
William White 1753-1829
Zachariah White 1755-1794
Josiah White 1752-1804
Robert White 1745-1786
Elizabeth White 1750-1848
Mary White 1755-Unknown
Lydia White 1750-1838
 
WHITE, Joseph (I11291)
 
112
MACKIE, William Syme (1845-1896)
British (Scottish) journalist and newspaper editor.

LIFE
Born 1845 in Dunfermline, son of John Mackie and Janet Syme. Brother of Robert Syme Mackie (q.v.) and John Beveridge Mackie (q.v.). Was married and John Beveridge Mackie, jun. (q.v.) was his son. A member of the Manchester Press Club and its second President. Joined the Institute of Journalists in 1887. Died 6 Nov. 1896. Address at 1893-at 1896: New Park Villa, Shelton, Stoke-on-Trent. At death: 29 Caledonian Road, Leeds.

CAREER
Dunfermline Press
Scotsman, rep. c.1866
Manchester Examiner & Times, chief rep. c.1870-
City Lantern (Manchester), cont. c.1875
City Jackdaw (Manchester), cont. c.1880
Edinburgh Daily Review, Ed. 1877-?
Manchester Examiner, Parl. & Ldn. corr. at 1881-1888
Staffordshire Sentinel, Ed. 1888-at 1896
North Staffordshire Herald, fndr. & Ed. c.1890's
Leeds Mercury, rep.: Ed. 5 Oct.-Nov. 1896
Source:https://www.scoop-database.com/bio/mackie_william_syme_1

LETTER FROM WILLIAM SYME MACKIE TO WILLIAM WOODALL
From a 19th century collection made by William Woodall, the radical Liberal M.P. for Stoke-on-Trent and Hanley and a trustee of the Wedgewood Institute.

5 October 1896
"I am leaving here today to take up new duties at Leeds on Monday. When I came to Hanley 8 years ago I never dreamt it possible that I should leave it with such a keen regret as I feel today. The appointment conferred upon me at the Leeds Mercury is from my point of view an ideal one and the principle offices in it are filled by warm personal friends of old standing. In that, except for my own deficiencies I have no [lessening of the sense of pleasure in my work. But it's hard to part with friends, who have shown me invariable kindness, foremost among whom I must reckon yourself. Not the least of the pleasures you have conferred on me is the great happiness of a close intimacy with our mutual friend, Mr Solon who, in the spirit of a brother, has brought me much help (unconsciously on his part & out of sheer good nature) on some very lonesome Saturday evenings of late when I have been weary and depressed. I am sorry to go without having a moment to run over to Bleak House to see you. I am uneasy about the future of the Liberal Party (or as far as journalism is concerned) in North Staffordshire and I could have wished not only for my own sake that something could have been done to maintain the Herald as a watchdog on our neighbours. I am trying all I can to sell and hope it may fall into good hands. With kind regards and good wishes, particularly under the affliction you suffer, I am my dear friend, yours" etc.


NEWS ARTICLE APPEARING IN THE JOURNALIST AND NEWSPAPER PROPRIETOR
Contains an account of the journalistic career of William Syme Mackie leading up to his appointment as editor of the Leeds Mercury.

William Syme Mackie began his career at the Scotsman under Alexander Russell before spending time as a reporter on the Manchester Examiner. He was a keen reporter on parliamentary affairs but an accident suffered at a cricket match (when a ball hit him in the eye) led him to give up the reporter's gallery of the House of Commons for what was, by comparison, a quite backwater on the Staffordshire Sentinel and the North Staffordshire Herald (which he founded). His deft reporting style, however, continued to be in evidence and he was rewarded by appointment to the editorship of the powerful and influential Leeds Mercury, one of the foremost newspapers of the day. His reference to Mr Solon in his letter to Woodall refers to Marc-Louis Solon, the French artist and porcelain designer, who had worked for Sevres before coming to England in 1870, where he worked for Mintons in Stoke-on-Trent.


THE SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EDITOR.
LEEDS MERCURY
7 November, 1896
A painful sensation was caused in journalistic circles yesterday by the death, so sudden as to be almost tragic, of Mr W. S. Mackie, editor of the ?Leeds Mercury?. Mr Mackie, who was only 52 years of age, had only been recently appointed to that responsible position, entering actively upon the duties with the hearty good wishes of all who knew him, at the beginning of last month. Pending the settlement of his family in Leeds, Mr Mackie had taken apartments at 29, Caledonian-road.
As he felt somewhat indisposed on Friday he remain indoors on the two following days, but resumed his occupation on Monday. He quitted the ?Mercury? office, apparently in good health, at 3 o?clock yesterday morning, and leaving his bedroom shortly before 10 o?clock, he mentioned that he was again ill, and agreed to a suggestion that the doctor should be sent for. He retired to his room, and in a few minutes Mrs worth, at whose house he was staying, found him in the lounge chair with his head thrown back, and in a dying condition. Mr Cameron, a colleague who resides in the neighbourhood, with sent for, but on his arrival Mr Mackie was quite unconscious. Death ensued almost immediately after the attack, and was obviously due to failure of the heart s action. Under the circumstances an inquest was necessary, and this was held in the afternoon by the City Coroner (Mr J. C. Malcolm). The principal witness was Mrs Worth, the landlady, who informed the jury that the deceased had lodged with her for five weeks. He was in good health till Friday morning last, when he complained of palpitation and pains in the back. He stayed at home on Saturday and Sunday, and then, feeling better, he resumed his duties of the office on Monday. Yesterday morning he rose fairly early, and witnesses noticed that he was not looking well. She asked him if he had been ill again. He said ?Yes,? and she asked him if he had better not have a doctor. He said ?Yes.? He went out and took a seidlitz powder. When he returned he retired to his room, and witness heard a gurgling noise. Rushing into his room she found him in a lounge chair, with his head thrown back. She loosened his collar, but he died soon afterwards. The Coroner: Did he die in the chair?-Witness: in my arms. - Witness added that she concluded he had been seized with a fit. ? The Coroner said that the deceased had apparently been taken with a fit, and the jury found the death was due to natural causes. -
Mr Mackie?s predecessor in the editorship of the ?Mercury? was Mr Herbert Baines, who died from fever off the West Coast of Africa a very short time ago, the seizure being equally sudden. Though new to Leeds, Mr Mackie had gained the esteem of those about him, and was rapidly making friends on every hand. His connection with the Press was lifelong. He commenced as a reporter on the staff of the ?Scotsman,? under the skilful guidance of the late Mr Alexander Russel, and showed remarkable aptitude for journalistic work. About 27 years ago he joined the staff of the ?Manchester Examiner? when that newspaper was in the height of its popularity, and his abilities soon gained for him the appointment of chief reporter, which he held for a number of years, doing excellent work. Then he joined his two brothers in the purchase of the ?Edinburg Review,? and under their direction the newspaper was greatly improved, though it eventually succumbed to the keen competition of old-established journals. It?s failure brought no discredit upon the three brothers, and such experienced and able journalists had no difficulty in finding employment elsewhere. Mr William went to the Parliamentary Gallery, and as London correspondent of the ?Manchester Examiner? gave further evidence of his powers. Whilst there he met with an accident which brought about another change. One day whilst watching the Gallery Cricket Club at play the ball struck him in the eye, with the result that the sight was rather seriously impaired. Mr Mackie thereupon wisely sought a less arduous field of labour than the ?Gallery,? and he obtained the editorship of the ?Staffordshire Sentinel.? At Hanley he did splendid work, as indeed he had done elsewhere, and as it was anticipated he would do in Leeds. Alas! expectation has been disappointed. In the brief space of five weeks he has been able to do little more than indicate through the columns on the ?Mercury? what were his qualities as a journalist. But in the office, and especially amongst those of his colleagues who have long known his worth, his editorship was regarded with the utmost confidence, and, outside his own family, none will deplore his too early death more than those who had the satisfaction of working side-by-side with him during his brief period. It need not be said that to his brothers - the one is editor of the ?North-Eastern Daily Gazette,? at Middlesbrough, and the other of the ?Northern Daily Telegraph,? at Blackburn - and to his son and three daughters, who were shortly to have moved from Hanley, as well as to the other members of the family, the news of Mr Mackie?s sudden death was a terrible blow. To his colleagues, who little thought that only six months after that the no less tragic death of Mr Herbert S. Baines, they were once more to lose their chief, the event came with painful surprise. The regret will be shared in many other newspaper offices in the country, for Mr Mackie was widely known and esteemed. His remains are to be laid beside those of his wife, who died about four years ago, at Dunfermline, his native place.
The ?Leeds Mercury? of to-day, commenting on the loss of its editor, says: ?We feel that we shall not ask in vain for the sympathy of our readers under the very sudden and distressing bereavement that has again within the brief period of six months befallen the proprietors and the staff of this journal. By the death of Mr William Syme Mackie, which occurred yesterday morning with terrible sadness, the editorial chair in this office is once more vacant. Only six months ago it was our very sad duty to record the sudden death in the flower on his manhood of Mr Herbert Baines, then editor of the ?Mercury.? Five weeks ago Mr Herbert Baines was succeeded by Mr Mackie, who has since discharged the arduous duties of his position with the zeal of a journalist his whole heart was in his word, and with an nurturing energy that was characteristic of the man. Mr Mackie had shown here as elsewhere that he was an indefatigable worker, and when he left his post yesterday morning, after seeing the earlier editions of the paper to press, he gave no sign of physical weakness or depression. He parted from his colleagues with all his habitual cheerfulness and high spirits. But the paper with the latest contributions from his pen had not been long in the hands of its readers ere it?s editor of a few weeks had passed away. During a connection with the newspaper Press extending over more than 30 years, Mr Mackie had made a host of friends both among public men and among his colleagues and associates in journalism, and sincere and deep will be the regret with which they will learn the news of his unusual death. Few journalists have had a more brilliant and more honourable career. Mr Mackie had the pen of a ready and a gifted writer, together with the capacity for and love of work that were the admiration of all who knew him intimately. His connection with the ?Scotsman? in the days of Alexander Russel his subsequent career on the ?Manchester Examiner? under the late Alexander Ireland and of the late Dr. Dunckley, and his editorship of the ?Edinburg Daily Review,? gave him an almost unequalled experience of public men and public affairs. He was overflowing with reminiscences of that most varied experience, and his friends both of the Press and outside the ranks of journalism will reflect with mingled pleasure and sadness over the genial, entertaining, and loyal-hearted friend they have lost so suddenly. To work, and work hard, was no effort to Mr Mackie. To have his pen in hand was a joy to him. Nothing daunted him in the way of duty. The task that had to be done he did seemingly without effort. He had the capacity of always rising to the occasion, and this capacity he would certainly have shown here if only he had been spared to continue the work on which he had entered with so much zeal and energy, and so much promise. Mr Mackie showed in a striking degree the qualities of thoroughness, straightforwardness, and sincerity in all he did. A man of deeply-rooted convictions, nothing would induce him to?
 
MACKIE, William Syme (I11343)
 
113
Will of Mary Dean, Jasper County, GA

Know all men by thye presents that
Mary Dean of the state of Georgia and
County of Jasper do for and in consideration of the
law and good will unto my sons Edmond and
Drury Dean do go and Bequeath and give all that tract
or parcil of land known by No one hundred and thirty
three in the seventeenth District having such share and
form and mark as appear by the plat. This is my will my son
Edmond Dean one half of said lot from the north line to
hold from the maple and the dogwood corner to the center of
the said land that my son Drury Dean shall have that half
of said to the south side of the two white oaks corners to have
and to hold each of them and their heirs and assigns forever and
the apportions may serve as a measure part of said lot
lying on the east line running from the maple to white
oak corner being and lying on the east side of the barn.
Be it understood said Lot of Land is not to be sold
without my consent or life time. Given under my hand
and seal this Second day of August 1814.
in presence of |
her
Wm McCord |
Mary Dean [seal]
William Diamond |
mark
John Lours |
Recorded 2 August 1814
---------
|
Henry Walker
Georgia, |
----------
Jasper County |

Personally appeared before me William Diamond and
of the subscribing witnesses to the within Deed
and being Duly sworn saith that he was present
and said within Deed signed acknowledged and
Demanded _____  
TAYLOR, Mary (I672075068)
 
114 Notes for JOSEPH MATTHEWS:
JOSEPH MATTHEWS was born about 1710-15, and married ELIZABETH, perhaps the daughter of JOHN STEVENSON and CATHERINE WIGGS.

On Oct. 15, 1753, he sold 150 acres on the South side of Three Creeks to John Brewer [Southampton County, VA Deed Book 2, p. 7].

He and his family were residing in Edgecombe Co., NC prior to July 13, 1764, when he conveyed two tracts of 275 acres and 691 acres on the North side of Swift Creek to Isaac Hilliard [Edgecombe Co., NC Deed Book C, pp. 296, 297].

He removed to old Cumberland County (now Harnett County) after 1771. His will was probated in Cumberland County in January, 1791.

 
MATTHEWS, Joseph (I41342)
 
115
Willis W Cherry [C1a8p], son of Lemuel Cherry and Gatsey Ann Llewellyn, was born about 1748 in Beaufort Co NC. He was under age when his father died in 1754, and was bound to William Willis before January 1765; William Willis was one of the executors of his father's will. By the summer of 1774 Willis Cherry owned land in Duplin Co, next to the 200 acres Thomas Bennett was granted on 22 July 1774 from the Crown. This land was on the north side of Goshen Swamp, and between Dry Pond Branch & White Oak Branch. Other neighbors at the time were John Oates, James Smith, and Joseph Wade.

Willis was in the Revolutionary War on the NC Continental Line in Wilmington District (Duplin Co area), and was granted 228 acres on Barton's Creek; this land was assigned (probably sold) to James Hicks on 12 December 1801 (warrant #3386, per thigpen). If so, the transfer was done by his heirs after Willis died in Duplin Co in September or October 1801. Willis was also in the NC Militia in Wilmington District. There are three warrant numbers associated with his service: #3356, #3675, and #3799. Willis witnessed two marriages in Duplin Co about 1780: the Sarah Bizzell - James Hurst marriage on 8 November 1779 and the James Bizzell - Mary Bowden marriage on 9 January 1781. This shows the close ties between Willis and the Bizzell families (Willis' son Lemuel married Sarah Bizzell).

In the 1784 state census of Duplin Co, Willis was the third from the last listed in the district of Captain Bowden's Company. In his home were one male over age 21 and under age 60 (Willis), two boys under the age of 21 (Lemuel & William), four females (his wife and three daughters), and one slave. Also in the same county in 1784 were other names with ties to the Cherry families in the counties to the northeast around Martin and Edgecombe Counties: Thigpen, Ward, Harrell, Grimes, Williams, Gray, Outlaw, to name a few.

In 1790 Willis' was the only Cherry family in the county (he was in the Wilmington District); in his home there were himself, three males under age 16 (born between1776 and 1790), and four females (Mary, the eldest daughter, married in 1788 and left her parents' home, and two more daughters were born to Willis and his wife since 1784). There were four slaves. In 1800 Willis was not found, but his wife Sarah ____ was; Willis was still alive, but since Sarah was the head of the household in the census, Willis must have been feeble, and perhaps bedridden. In her household in 1800 were two girls under age 10 (Nancy & Polly), two girls (Sarah & Rebecca) & one boy (George) age 10 to 15, two boys age 16 to 25 (William & Lemuel), Sarah, age 26 to 44, and seven slaves. The 1810 census shows Sarah living about midway between Lemuel and William, her two eldest sons (now married); she had one boy in her home, age 16 to 25 (George), one girl age 10 to 15 (Patience, Nancy now was probably married), herself age 45 or older, and six slaves. Sarah was also found in Duplin Co in 1820, living alone, age over 45. She was born between 1756 and 1765, according to the 1800 and 1810 census records, so was probably not the mother of Willis' eldest daughter.

Duplin Co court records from April 1785 and July 1785 reveal that Willis Cherry was the overseer in charge of clearing the main channel of Goshen Swamp in District 14 during the dry season. The swamp was the waterway by which barges and flat-bottom boats carried supplies into and out of the northwest corner of the county. District 14 was approximately four miles southeast of the present-day town of Calypso, and four miles northwest of Beaufancus. The hands working under Willis in clearing the waterway were James Bizzell, William Stone, Arthur Bizzell, Hardy Bizzell and his negro, Thomas Bennett, William Bennett, Samuel Bennett, "& all others belonging to their families. "

Willis left a will dated 12 October 1800 in Duplin Co, and he died in September or October the following year. His will named "beloved wife Sarah Cherry" (she received "one negro wench by the name of Juda" and a negro named Tess, plus household furniture and one-third of the plantation where Willis lived), his six daughters Mary Bennett, Elizabeth Millard, Rebecca Cherry, Nancy Cherry, Sally Cherry, Polly Cherry, and sons George Cherry, Lemuel Cherry, and son William Cherry (William received the plantation Willis bought from John Bradley on the north side of Pond Branch). Near the end of the will he named another daughter Patience Cherry, but also said he only had six daughters, and re-named them. Polly's position from the first list of daughters was replaced with Patience in the second listing. The two youngest sons, in addition to land, each received "one horse creater." Son George was under age 21 when the will was written. Witnesses were Hardy Bizzell, William Cherry, and Rebecca Cherry. Executors were Hardy Bizzell, and Willis' eldest son Lemuel; Lemuel was often called "Lamb" in the will. Willis could not sign his name, so made his "?" instead (he also made an "?" when he witnessed the two Bizzell marriages of about 1780). His nine children, all named in the will, were-

1. Mary Cherry, b abt 1768
2. Elizabeth Cherry, b abt 1775
3. William Cherry, b 1776-1780
4. Lemuel Cherry, b 1779
5. Rebecca Cherry, b 1784
6. Sarah Cherry, b abt 1785
7. George Cherry, b 1785-1790
8. Nancy Cherry, b 1790
9. Patience Polly Cherry, b 1795-1800 (68,99, 108,WD,5p,35maehijnypz)

Source: Cherry Biographies by John Young
 
CHERRY, Willis W. (I40941)
 
116 1694 Westmoreland, Stafford, Virginia, USA, Constable & Sub-Sheriff[8] willed to him

Land The 500 acres left to him by John Williams was traced back and found to ajoin 600 acres owned by John Williams which was passed to his only son, John Williiams, II.[9]

Land Sep 1698 Stafford, Virginia, USA 1698, September, Stafford County (later Fairfax County), VA, deed.

Land 26 Oct 1698 Westmoreland, Virginia, USA John Trammell of lower Mackotick, Cople Parish, Westmoreland Co., and Mary his wife, sell to John Gardner land in Stafford and Westmoreland County . . . a part of a tract of land devised to said John Grammell by John Williams, deceased."[10] 
TRAMMELL, John Sr (I92860)
 
117 NOTE: Information on M. Elizabeth "Betsey" McCollister and J. J. Davis marriage and family is based on federal census data from Carroll Co., GA., Muscogee, Co., GA., Wood Co., TX. and from records in Muscogee Co., GA., deed book I, p. 334.
NOTE: See associated 1850, 1860, 1870, & 1880 census data under J. J. Davis' information.

INDENTURED DEED: Deed records in Muscogee Co., GA., deed book I, p. 334, show J.J. Davis as one of the signers to sell Sarah Bailey McCollister's portion of her father's estate in Carroll Co., GA. Sarah's father was Robert S. Bailey (see full transcription of his will under Robert S. Bailey information). All of the signers of the deed are believed to be Sarah Bailey McCollister's known children and/or their spouses, with the exception of her daughter, Syrena Emaline McCollister. Since J.J. Davis signed the deed, the assumption is that he was a son-in-law of Sarah McCollister and the husband of Betsey, shown as wife of J.J. Davis in the 1850 Carroll Co. census. Therefore, it is assumed that Betsey was a McCollister and was the first born child of Robert and Sarah Bailey McCollister.

NOTE: M. Elizabeth McCollister and Syrena Emaline McCollister married brothers, i.e., J. J. Davis and Edley J. Davis, Sr.

NOTE: The obituary of William McCollister, M. Elizabeth McCollister Davis' brother, noted that William was survived by a sister named M. Davis. William died June 24, 1907 in Phenix City, AL. Therefore, we know that M. Elizabeth Davis died after June 24, 1907.





Father: Robert McCollister\McAlister b: BET 1795 AND 1797 in County Antrim, Ireland
Mother: Sarah "Sallie" Bailey b: ABT 1806 in Anderson/Pendleton Dist., S.C.

Marriage 1 John Jefferson Davis b: MAR 1826 in Tennessee

Married: 6 JAN 1847 in Carroll Co., GA 1
Event: Marriage Records 1850 in Georgia, Carroll Co. Marriage Records Data, Book C1, p. 195.
Note:

Georgia Marriages to 1850
Name: Elizabeth McCallister
Spouse: John Davis
Marriage Date: 06 Jan 1847
County: Carroll
State: Georgia

Children

Has No Children Mary Elizabeth Davis b: ABT 1847 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has Children Georgia Ann Davis b: 3 JUN 1849 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has No Children Susan Davis b: ABT 1851 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has Children James Thomas Davis b: 3 DEC 1854 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has No Children Sarah L. "Sally" Davis b: 1857 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has No Children Nancy Jane Davis b: ABT 1859 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has No Children Jackson J. Davis b: ABT 1862 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has Children John Jefferson Davis b: MAR 1865 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA
Has No Children Hannah L. Davis b: 22 MAR 1866 in Temple, Carroll Co., GA


Sources:

Title: Georgia Marriages to 1850  
MCCOLISTER, M Elizabeth (I11278)
 
118 Notes by Ronny O. Bodine:

WILLIAM RUSH. In or before 1658, William Rush married Anne, daughter of Francis Gray. The following deed, written 20 Nov 1658, was recorded in Westmoreland County on 28 Nov 1658 (Deeds & Wills, Vol. 1, p. 78):

Francis Gray of Appamattox, Westmoreland Co. to William Rush for many and sundry considerations me there unto moving as well as the tender affection I bear unto my daughter, Anne, have and doe by these presents freely give, make over and bestow upon and unto William Rush, husband unto my said daughter, a tract of land containing 100 acres, being part of a tract owned by me lying in the county aforesaid, and being at a place commonly called the Round Hills, nigh unto the Machodick river-to William Rush and his heirs by the body of my said daughter, forever. The said William Rush yielding and paying unto me and my heirs for an acknowledgement, one pepper corn an annum, the said pepper corn to be paid at or upon the feast of St. Michael, the archangel.

The aforesaid 100-acre tract was in turn given on 3 Jan 1673/4 to Joshua Hudson upon his marriage to William RushŁus daughter Elizabeth (refer to the above account of Joshua Hudson).

Three generations of William RushŁus are attested to in the following lease and release of land recorded in Westmoreland County Deed Book 8-2, p. 145-147:

William Rush of Washington Parish, Westmoreland Co., Va. to Rev. David Stuart, of St. PaulŁus Parish, Stafford Co., Va., being 100 acres purchased from Robert Howson by William Rush, the grandfather of the above mentioned grantor and lesser, and granted by deed of gift to William Rush his son, the father of the above grantor, as by deed bearing date the 22 July 1689, relation thereunto being had, may more at large appear, and now descended by inheritance to William Rush, the grantor thereof, the grandson to the above William Rush, the first purchaser hereof, the which tract was re-patented and granted to William Rush the first purchaser aforesaid the 10th January, 1704.

William Rush was living 22 July 1689 when he deeded the above 100 acres to his son, but what became of him remains to be determined. Because of the three generations all bearing the same name it is difficult to distinguish what event pertains to whom. The third William Rush died 1707-8 and it was Joshua Hudson who was one of his creditors (Westmoreland Co. Deeds and Wills, Book 4, p. 165)

************************************************************************************************************************


 
RUSH, William II (I671953252)
 
119 Tyler's Quarterly Magazine page 54
Collins.
Francis Kirtley, apparently the immigrant, was b. probably about 1690, and wa m. circa 1 712. Probably he came first to Falmouth and later resided in Spotsylvania Co. His wife was Margaret, dau. of John Roberts, of Spots., who d. 1724 (Crozier's Spots. Rec., p. 1). Our earliest knowledge of John Roberts is found in Stafford Rec. Liber., p. 267, April 11, 1705, John Trammill of Stafford sells to John Roberts of the same county 100 a. on the south side of Potomac Creek, part of a tract granted Francis Waddington now decd. and sold by his son Francis Waddington to the sd. Trammill. On July 12, 1718 John Roberts is granted two patents (S.L.O. Book 11, page 376), one for 194 a. on the S. side of Rappahannock River in the fork in St. Mary's Par. beginning at the riverside at the upper end of an island, etc., the other for 100 a. "beginning on the north side of the mountain view." At the time of the patent he was living in Overwharton par., Stafford Co. By May 12, 1722 (Crozier's Spots. Rec., p. 88), as John Roberts, of St. George's Par., Spots. Co., he deeded this 100 a. on the mountain run as a gift to his son-in-law, Francis Kirtley.

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
DEEDS
DEED BOOK A 1722-1729
page 88
John x Roberts of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., Va., to son-in-law Francis Kerley of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co. Dated: May 14, 1722. Recd: Septr. 4, 1722. "100 a. on ye mountain run"­patented July 12, 1718. Witnesses: Augt. Smith, Daniel Huff, Abel Maylard.

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
ADMINISTRATION BONDS
WILL BOOK A
page 54
£100 John Finalson, admr. of John Joseph Abbitt, decd., with Abram Bledsoe and John Roberts, sec. Nov. 6, 1722.

1724 Spotsylvania Co., VA., WILL OF JOHN ROBERTS
Spotsylvania County, Spotsylvania, Virginia Will Records Book A Page 9-
In the name of God Amen. I, John Roberts, of St. George Parish in the County of Spotsylvania being in perfect sense and memory I bless Allmighty God for the same , but being sick and weak and calling to mind the certianty of death do make and ordain this my last will and testament.
First and principally I give my soul in to the hands of Almighty God nothing doubting but through the meritorious death of my Blessed Lord and Saviour I shall receive the same again at the General Resurrection and as for my body I recommend it to the earth to be buried in a Christian and decent like manner at the direction of my Executors hereafter mentioned and as for such worldly Estate as it hath pleased Almighty God to bless me with all; I give and bequeath as follows, that after my debts and funeral charges being paid.
Imprimis: I give and bequeath unto my son Jno. Roberts all that tract of land laying up on the Flatt Run joyning to Hack Norman containing four hundred acres to him and his heirs forever.
Item: I give and bequeath unto my son, Benjamin Roberts all that tract of land laying o n both sides the mountain Run joyning on Roger Abbots and Fields containing four hundred acres more or less to him and his heirs forever.
Item: I give and bequeath unto my son George Roberts my new Dweling Plantation with all the land adjoining to it with all the aprovements to him and his heirs forever.
Item: I further give unto my son Benjamin Roberts a young horse called Snip and my bridle and sadle and a young black mare colt that came of my old mare Ginney to him and his assignes forever.
Item: I further give unto my son George Roberts my old black mare Ginney and a young sorrell horse with a star in his forehead to him and his assignes forever.
Item: I give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary Paten Five Shillings currant cash to her and her assigns etc.
Item: I give to my son John Roberts one fether bedd bolster pair blankets and one rugg.
Item: I give to my son Benjamin Roberts one fether bedd bolster pair blankets and one rugg.
Item: I give and bequeath to my sons John Roberts, Benjamin Roberts and George Roberts all the residue of my Estate moveables and immoveables in what nature so ever to be equally divided to them.
Item: My will and pleasure is that my son-in-law Francis Kirtley and my son John Roberts be my full and sole Executors of this my last will and testament. Revoking and making voyd all former wills by me made. In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 10th Day of September Anno Dom. 1724.
John Roberts
At a Court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday the 3d day of November Anno Dom 1724.
This will was proved in open Court by the oaths of Goodrich Lightfoot, John Brown and Matthew Bailey the evidences of said will and was likewise proved by the oath of Francis Kerkley Executor therin mentioned and is admitted to record.
Copy Teste: John Waller, Clerk Court
Know all men by these presents that we Francis Kirkley, Goodrich Lightfoot and Robert Green are held and firmly bound unto the worshipfull his Majesties Justices of the peace for the County of Spotsylvania in the penal sum of five hundred pounds sterling to the payment whereof will and truly to be made to the said Justices we bind ourselves and every of us our and every of our heirs Executor and Admins jountly and severally firmly by these presents.
Witness our hands and seals this 3d day of November 1724.

Comments by: Ed Roberts, 2400 One American Square, P.O. Box 82012, Indianapolis, Indiana 46282 July 1998
John Roberts, Sr. is commonly referred to as John of Spots.
Born 1657/58 in New Kent County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Trammell the daughter of John Trammell who conveyed to him the land described below.
Land owner and planter of Overwharton Parish, Stafford Co., Virginia in 1705 when he purchased for 4700 pounds of tobacco a parcel of 100 acres from John Trammel on the south side of Potomac Creek. In 1718 he lived in what was then Essex County, Virginia. He died in St. George's Parish, Spotsylvania Co., Virginia in 1724 leaving five children viz: John, Margaret, George, Mary and Benjamin. Each of his three sons also had a son named Benjamin. As new counties formed, the holdings which had been John's passed into Orange County in 1734 and into Culpeper County in 1748. He bought and sold several parcels of land betweeen 1705 and 1724. Transcripts on file. His two older sons John and George were born prior to 1703 as they had reached their majority when his will was probated in 1724. The youngest, Benjamin, was born after 1703 (probably about 1707) as he was a minor subject to the appointment of a guardian under Virginia law when the will was probated. His will was dated September 10, 1724 and proved November 3rd, 1724.
All the land described by John Roberts in his will is, conforming with other deeds by which he acquired the property in the "Great Fork of the Rappahannock" that is in the area now bounded by the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers, in modern Culpeper County, Virginia. At least some of that property is now owned by T.O. Madden Jr. and his son Tom Madden. Your compiler has stood upon the land with Tom Madden. Mountain Run flows from western Culpeper County through the town of Culpeper and empties into the Rappahannock at the eastern boundary of Culpeper. Flat Run flows from northern central Culpeper southward into Mountain Run. The confluence of these two streams is about three miles west of Kelly's Ford on the Rappahannock. Your compiler has searched these lands. They are currently tilled farmland with a few dwellings on them. These are relatively large farms. There is no road at the confluence of the streams. Much of this land can only be accessed or even seen by entering onto private lands.

WILLS
WILL BOOK A 1722-1749
page 1
ROBERTS, JOHN, St. George's Parish, d. Sept. 10, 1724, p. Nov. 3, 1724. Wit. G. Lightfoot, John Brown, Matthew Bailey. Ex. son-in-law Francis Kirkley; son John Roberts. Leg. son John, land on Flatt Run joining Hack Norman; son Benjamin, land joining Roger Abbott; son George; daughter Mary Paten. (Page 9)

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
GUARDIANS BONDS
WILL BOOK A
page 70
£50 William Thomas, guard. to Benjamin Roberts, orph. of John Roberts, with Augustine Smith, sec. Feb. 1, 1725-6.

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
GUARDIANS BONDS
WILL BOOK A
page 70
£200 William Payton, guard. to Benjamin Roberts, orph. of John Roberts, with William Russell, sec. Dec. 6, 1726.

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
DEEDS
DEED BOOK C 1734-1742
page 146
John Word of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., mortgage to Joseph Woolfolk of St. Margaret's Par., Caroline Co. £22 9s. 2d. curr., and 60 lbs. Tob. Wit-nesees: John Holladay, Chas. Stevens, John x Roberts. Dated, Augt. 25, 1728. Recd., Oct. 4, 1738.

Virginia County Records SPOTSYLVANIA COUNTY 1721-1800
DEEDS
DEED BOOK B 1729-1734
page 113
July 7, 1730. John x Roberts, son and heir of John Roberts, late of Spts. Co., Decd., and Francis x Kirtley of St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., to Roger Oxford of same Par. and County. 6000 lbs. tob., 100 a. in St. Geo. Par., Spts. Co., in Great Fork, Rappk. River, formerly granted sd. John Roberts, Decd., by pat. July 12, 1718; conveyed by sd. Roberts, decd., to Francis Kirtley by deed of gift in Spts. Co. Court, Sept. 4, 1722. W. Russell, Robert Green, Samuel Ball. July 7, 1730. Elizabeth Roberts and Margaret Kirtley acknowledged their right of dower, etc.


 
Family F26410
 
120 Biography

In 1635, the immigrant William Rush arrived in America at age 20, aboard the ship Matthew of London.

A "young man of Dutch descent, whom Sir Thomas Luntsford brought over with Thomas Terrell, John and Lawrence Washington and others." Originally the Rush family were English Quakers.[1]
William Rush I, II, III, IV

Following is my working conjecture of the four generations, based on how dates and other information from various sources might fit together (see Research Notes, below for how I got here). ~ Liz Shifflett, April 1, 2016

William Rush (1615-1689 91/2), immigrant, arrived 1635, age 20, aboard the Mathew [left infant son in England[2]]. Acquired lands on the Machodeck river in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1644, as evidenced by deeds found at Montross, Westmorland County.[1]

William Rush (c1635-1691/2), transported in 1650 by Sir Thomas Huntsford, Bnt., [joining his father[2]]. Married Ann Grey (b after 1639). Their children: William, Elizabeth (m Jossua Hudson), and Mary (m Philip Peyton). Married Dorothy (widow of Christopher Thomas) in 1686.

William Rush (c1660-1707) m Elizabeth Perry
William Rush (before 1687 - not a minor when his father died)
Benjamin Rush (after 1687 - division of father's property indicated another son, but not named, indicating he was a minor), married Amy, widow of James Elkins

William Rush (before 1687-1735) married Mary; moved to what became Orange County, Virginia, where he died.

Anne Grey

Wife of William Rush prior to 1658 and mother of Elizabeth, m Jossua Hudson, and Ann, m Philip Peyton.

Anne was the daughter of Francis Grey by his wife Alice Moreman, who were married in 1638 and moved to Virginia (from Maryland) in 1647.[1]

If Anne was born in 1639 and married at 16 (fairly common for the time and place), marriage to William Rush would have been 1655.

Dorothy

Probably the wife of the same William Rush who married Anne Grey, after Anne passed away, although the Milams of Virginia site has her as marrying that William's father.[3] Apparently no Rush children either way.

In 1686, William married Dorothy, the widow of Christopher Thomas. Dorothy was shown as William's widow in January 1691/2 court records. Her next husband was William Bennett.[3]

Research Notes

I had originally estimated a 1625 birth year guess based on his marriage in 1686 to Dorothy (widow of Christopher Thomas), who was William's widow in January 1691/2 court records. (Dorothy's next husband was William Bennett.)[3]

However, his son's birth year is estimated (in WikiTree) as 1630, based on a 1658 deed of land to him by his father-in-law Francis Grey. And that profile shows him (husband of Ann Grey) to be the same William Rush who married (2) Dorothy, widow of Christopher Thomas.

From the Owsley Family Historical Society (OFHS), citing the following "lease and release of land recorded in Westmoreland County Deed Book 8-2, p. 145-147", we have three known generations of William Rush in Virginia:[4]

"William Rush of Washington Parish, Westmoreland Co., Va. to Rev. David Stuart, of St. Paul?s Parish, Stafford Co., Va., being 100 acres purchased from Robert Howson by William Rush, the grandfather of the above mentioned grantor and lesser, and granted by deed of gift to William Rush his son, the father of the above grantor, as by deed bearing date the 22 July 1689, relation thereunto being had, may more at large appear, and now descended by inheritance to William Rush, the grantor thereof, the grandson to the above William Rush, the first purchaser hereof, the which tract was re-patented and granted to William Rush the first purchaser aforesaid the 10th January, 1704."

The Milams of Virginia also has this entry, headed 25 JUL 1733 WILLS AND DEEDS, page 223 ? 224, and another following, 26 JUL 1733 WILLS AND DEEDS, page 224, in which Mary, wife of William Rush {IV}, relinquishes her dower rights.[3]

this site attributes Willam m Mary as {III} & born-died before 1687-1735 in Orange County, Virginia. That site shows the following generations:[1]

William b 1615 (m Ann, born 1639, in 1655)
William b 1666 (m Elizabeth) d 1707 (later in site shows b 1659-60)
William b before 1687 (m Mary) d 1735

The OFHS site also notes:

"Two men named William Rush are known to have come to America in the first half of the 17th-century. The first William Rush arrived in 1635 aboard the Matthew when he was 20 years old. The second William Rush was transported in 1650 by Sir Thomas Huntsford, Bnt. It seems likely that one of these men was the father of...William Rush [who married] married Anne, daughter of Francis Gray."

Text on the WikiTree profile page for William m Anne Grey (Rush-700) appears to combine the the William Rushes that the Milams of Virginia website refers to separately as {I} {II} and {III}.

William Rush b 1615 (arrived 1635 aboard the Mathew) {OFHS; needs better}

William Rush married by 20 November 1658 to Anne Grey {deed}; still married 7 June 1667 {date of her father's will}

William Rush b 1637-9; m Anne 7/21/1652; died 1707[1]{needs better}

William Rush, Attorney for Mr. Thomas Davis and his wife Ann, Oct. 1663 {court record} Milams site attributes as {II} & includes related entries - 1654, a Captain Thomas Davis gave 100 acres of land to William Rush (apparently same land Mr Davis now selling by way of William). Captain Davis rec'd 1651/2 600 acres in Northumberland Co. for transporting 12 persons.

William Rush died by Jan. 1691/2 {court record} Milams site attributes as {I}

27 JAN 1691/92 ORDER BOOK, page 46. On petition of Dorothy Rush (relic of William Rush {I}, and earlier relic of Christopher Thomas)....ordered that William Horton and John Pratt do lay out and divide the land of William Rush {I} together with housing and orchard, etc.... now in possession {lease} of Charles Ashton

William Rush gives land Jan 3, 1673/4 to Jossua Hudson:{deed}

"for natural love and affection I bear unto my daughter Elizabeth....as also a marriadge contracted and solemnized betweene Jossua Hudson of Upper Machoteck and my said daughter....100 acres. Same 100 acres that Francis Gray, deceased, in consideration of natural affection he bore unto his daughter Anne did give unto William Rush, husband unto Anne...."
Note: Milams attributes to {II} (who married Ann Grey), but the text reads more like it should be {III}, who married Elizabeth. (Dates make that unlikely, though. Marriage contract in 1673, if daughter was 18, would call for birth in 1655.)
OFHS site also shows William m Ann as father of Elizabeth m Hudson.

William Rush died before 26 Jan. 1708/9, relic Elizabeth {probate/inventory} Milams site attributes as {III} and shows activity by William Rush after that as {II}, who isn't attributed as having a will or a reference in a deed as "dec'd"; this page has death in 1707 for the William m Ann Grey[1] (Milams site has William m Grey as {II})

William Rush of Washington Parish, Westmoreland Co., in 1678 gave 200 acres to Philip Payton, husband of William's daughter Mary Rush. {deed} Milams site attributes to {II}

Wiliam Rush, son and heir of William Rush, deceased... (land purchased from Robert Howson on 12 Jan 1664/5) {22 July 1689, grant} Milams site attributes to {II} and {III}

William Rush deceased early 1691 (Milams site, attributing to {II})

Conclusion? Distilling the information from the different sites, I think the following might be a possibility. ~ Noland-165 01:10, 1 April 2016 (EDT)

William Rush (1615-1689 91/2), immigrant, arrived 1635, age 20, aboard the Mathew (left infant son in England[5]). Acquired lands on the Machodeck river in Westmoreland County, Virginia, in 1644, as evidenced by deeds found at Montross, Westmorland County.[1]
William Rush (c1635-1691/2), transported in 1650 by Sir Thomas Huntsford, Bnt., joining his father. Married Ann Grey (b after 1639). Had William, Elizabeth (m Jossua Hudson), and Mary (m Philip Peyton). Married Dorothy (widow of Christopher Thomas) in 1686.
William Rush (c1660-1707) m Elizabeth Perry
William Rush (before 1687-1735) married Mary

Sources

? 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6 William Rush, compiled by Nancy Werner
? 2.0 2.1 sheer speculation on my part - Noland-165
? 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 William Rush Chronology, Milams in Virginia
? from this site, the Owsley Family Historical Society (OFHS)
? sheer speculation on my part - Noland-165 
RUSH, William I (I11082)
 
121 Born in Jones, Georgia, USA on 12 Jan 1823 to Reuben Roberts and Nancy. Martha Ann married Charles Sherman Thomas and had 6 children.

Charles Ruben Thomas1843-1862
William Edward Thomas1846-Unknown
Solomon James Thomas1850-1889
Nathan Luke Thomas1853-Unknown
Methven Sherman Thomas1856-Unknown
Susan Ann Thomas1864-Unknown

 
ROBERTS, Martha Ann (I672075486)
 
122 EDWIN3 LAMBERTH (JOHN2 LAMBERT, JR, JOHN1) was born Bet. 1779 - 1780 in Rowan County, North Carolina, and died 1850 in Tallapoosa County, Alabama. He married (1) SUSANNA BRASWELL in North Carolina, daughter of JOSEPH BRASWELL. She was born Bet. 1780 - 1785 in North Carolina, and died 1809. He married (2) SALLY HANSON December 14, 1809 in Morgan County, Georgia, daughter of JESSE HANSON and ELIZABETH CRAWFORD. She was born in Virginia.

Notes for EDWIN LAMBERTH:

Joseph Braswell made a deed of gift dated July 18, 1809 in Clark County, Georgia for love and affection for his daughter Susanna Lambert, to her daughter Jerusa Lambert and to Sally Lambert.

Edwin Lambert appeared in Clark County, Georgia where he drew in the 1805 Land Lottery. He married Sally Hanson 12-14-1809 in Morgan County, Georgia. He was living in Walton County in 1820 and in 1830 he had moved to the new County of Fayette that was created on 1-8-1821 from India Lands.

He was elected Judge of the Inferior Court of Fayette County for 1828.

He appeared on the tax rolls for Fayette County from 1823 until 1833.

Edwin Lambert was listed in Company H3 of the Fayette Dragoons 53rd regiment Georgia Militia at Fort Twiggs on June 14, 1836. He served as the appraiser of Moses Westbrook estate 2-11-1835 in Fayette County, Ga.

Edwin Lambert was listed on the 1840 census of Fayette County, Georgia and had moved to Tallapoosa County, Alabama between 1840 and 1850 where he died in 1850.



More About EDWIN LAMBERTH and SUSANNA BRASWELL:

Marriage: North Carolina

More About EDWIN LAMBERTH and SALLY HANSON:

Marriage: December 14, 1809, Morgan County, Georgia


Children of EDWIN LAMBERTH and SUSANNA BRASWELL are:

i. JERUSHA4 LAMBERTH, b. 1801, Franklin County, Georgia; d. 1869; m. GEORGE W. HANSON, May 07, 1825, Fayette County, Georgia.

Notes for JERUSHA LAMBERTH:

Jerusha and George W. Hanson lived in Floyd County, Georgia where they wer on the 1850 census.

More About GEORGE HANSON and JERUSHA LAMBERTH:

Marriage: May 07, 1825, Fayette County, Georgia

ii. SARAH LAMBERTH, b. April 04, 1802, Clark County, Georgia; d. January 06, 1882; m. WILLIAM HANSON.

iii. JOHN LAMBERTH, b. June 03, 1805, Clark County, Georgia; d. August 16, 1876, Elmore County, Alabama; m. PAMELA GARRISON, September 24, 1826, Fayette County, Georgia; b. March 25, 1809; d. August 06, 1866, Elmore County, Alabama.

Notes for JOHN LAMBERTH:

John and Permelia lambert moved from Carroll County, Georgia to Tallapoosa County, Alabama in 1851.

The Civil War years were devastating to this family. They lost four of their sons and one Son- in-law in the war, and two daughters shortly before the war.  
LAMBERTH, Edwin M. Sr (I7442)
 
123 Lemuel Cherry [C1a8p4], son of Willis W Cherry and Sarah _____ of Duplin Co NC, was born in 1779 in Duplin Co (he was age 71 in the 1850 Duplin Co census). Lemuel was named in his father's will, and at times was called "Lamb."

Lemuel married Sarah Bizzell (per source 99), his neighbor, and daughter of William Bizzell and Hannah _____, about the end of the 1790s. She was born in 1771, and must have died within a year or two, because Lemuel married Rockselena Duncan in Duplin Co on 20 January 1801 (per mg records, Duplin Co). Bond was given by Hardy Bizzell, who was Lemuel's brother-in-law when he was still married to Sarah Bizzell, and the witness was William Dickson, the county clerk.

Rockselena's father may have been Isaac Duncan who lived next door to Lemuel in 1790; there were also other Duncan families in the county at the time.

Lemuel in 1810 and 1820 lived close to his brother William Cherry, of about the same age. Lemuel was an ensign in the 9th Company of Duplin Co and served in the War of 1812 (shown as "Samuel Cherry" in some printed books).

His wife Rockselena was born in the early 1780s. He had five children by 1810 (all under age 10) and four slaves, seven children by 1820, and then ten by 1830.

Rockselena died between 1830 and 1850, and in 1850 Lemuel was living with Elender Young, probably his sister's in-law.

Nancy (Cherry) Young was living with Duncan Cherry, Lemuel's son, two doors from Lemuel. "Lemuel Cherry Died September the 6th 1859" per family bible record. Mr A R Hicks, age 46, was the administrator for Lemuel's estate.

Lemuel's children were-

a. dau Cherry, b 1802-1804, married or died in 1820s. (35hij)

b. son Cherry, b 1802-1804 (35hi)

c. dau Cherry, b 1805-1810, married or died in 1820s. (35hij)

d. dau Cherry, b 1805-1810, still at home in 1830. (35hij)

e. William Duncan Cherry, b 2 Oct 1806 in Duplin Co NC. He married Ann J _____ on 6 February 1834. In 1830 Duncan was not living in his father's home. Ann was born in NC on 22 January 1815 (age 30s in 1840), and by 1850 they had seven children-

1. Eliza L Cherry, b 9 May 1835 (B)

2. Willis Wright Cherry, b 2 Feb 1837 in Duplin Co NC. He married Narcissa(?) _____ about 1856, and they lived a few doors from his brother George in 1860. Narcissa was born in NC in 1841. Willis was a Private in Company B, 8th Battalion. He died 6 July 1862. By 1860 they had two daughters-

a. Ann Cherry, b 1857 in Duplin Co NC.

b. Martha Cherry, b Dec 1859 in Duplin Co NC. (B,144,35knq)

3. George T Cherry, b 1838 in Duplin Co NC. In 1860 he lived in or near Mount Olive, and had married Hipsy(?) Ann _____ about 1859. She was born in NC in 1840. George was a Private in the 21st Company, 36th Regiment in the CSA. He was asge 23 in 1861. "T T Cherry dide August the 29 1868 in his 30 year" per family bible. They had a daughter by 1860-

a. dau Cherry, b Jan 1860 in Duplin Co NC.

A Mr Kind... Tou... (?), age 66, was living with George and Hipsy in 1860. (35nq, 144)

4. Elisha James Cherry, b 12 Feb 1840. He served as a Private Company E, 20th Regiment of the CSA, and was age 21 in 1861 in the army. He was the E J Cherry, born in NC in 1840, who was living in Wayne Co in 1880. Elisha married Joanna Armstrong in Wilson Co on 6 April 1870. They lived in Wilson Co in 1870, and Wayne Co in 1880. She was born in NC in 1850. Elisha also Mary Elizabeth Rogers at Pink Hll, Lenoir Co on 9 October 1898; they lived at Trent, Lenoir Co in 1900, then were back at Wolfscrape, Duplin Co in 1910. In 1920 they were at Brogden, Wayne Co. Elisha died 2 February 1922 at Mount Olive, Wayne Co, age "81 years, 11 months,19 days." His death record named his father as Duncan Cherry. "F A Jones" was the informant for his death certificate. Elisha was buried in his family cemetery in Wayne Co. Mary E Rogers was born 7 February 1840 in NC, daughter of Curtis Rogers and Mary Walter, and died 15 June 1918 at Wolfscrape, Duplin Co. She was buried in Seven Springs Methodist Church Cemetery in Wayne Co. William A Cherry was the informant for her death certificate. Elisha had two children by 1880-

a. Leah June Cherry, b 1875 (396s)

b. Roxanna Cherry, b 1879. Her great grandmother was Rockselena Duncan, which might explain the rare name (for the 19th Century) of Roxanna. (W,144,35k,396s)

5. William Augustus Cherry, b 15 Jul 1844. He served as a Private in Company E, 20th regiment of the CSA, and was age 16 in 1861. He was the W A Cherry who was living in Wayne Co in 1880. W A was married to Emily _____, born in NC in 1842, and they had four children-

a. Luellen Cherry, b 1867 (396s)

b. George Cherry, 1872 (396s)

c. James Cherry, b 1875 (396s)

d. Kate C Cherry, b 1878 (396s) (144,396s

6. Daniel Columbus Cherry, b 24 Dec 1846. He was a Private in the 36th Regiment in the CSA. He was age 15 in 1861. (B,144)

7. Briant W Cherry, b 24 Dec 1848 (born 1842 per 1880 census). He married Julia _____ about 1876 and in 1880 they were living in Duplin Co. Julia was born in NC in 1850. The had a child by 1880-

a. Leonidas Cherry, b 1877 in Duplin Co NC. (35s) (B,35s)

A Nancy Young, age 60 and born in NC, was living with Duncan and his wife in 1850. Nancy was probably Duncan's aunt, Nancy Cherry, who married a Mr Young. (B,35hijknp)

f. George Washington Cherry, b 1810
g. dau Cherry, b 1815-1820, was still at home in 1830. (35ij)
h. dau Cherry, b 1815-1820, was still at home in 1830. (35ij)
i. dau Cherry, b 1821-1825 (35j)

William Dickson was the county clerk in 1779, 1784, 1786, 1801, and perhaps in other years. William Parker, age 17, was living with Lemuel and Elender in 1850. A R Hicks, the administrator of Lemuel's estate, was married to Athamesia _____. She was born in 1816, and by 1860 had nine children aged between 19 years and 10 months.

In 1784 there were only two Bizzell families, and in the same district as Lemuel's father's home. They were: William Bizzell (next door to Willis) with two males under age 21 (or one male under 21, one between 21 and 60, and one ? William ? over age 60) and four females; and James Bizzell with a boy under age 21 and two females. William Bizzell and his wife Hannah (called "Hanner" in William's will) moved from VA to Edgecombe Co NC in 1763, and on to Duplin Co in 1772. They settled on the north side of Goshen Swamp, and the east side of White Oak Branch. They had the following children: son James, born 1760, died in 1822, married Mary Bowden; son Arthur, born 1762, died in 1822, married Elizabeth Ann Turner; daughter Nancy, born in 1764, never married, and died in 1830; daughter Patty was born in 1765, married _____ Worrell; son Hardy, born in 1769, died in 1848, and married Margaret Denmark; daughter Sarah, born in 1771, married Lemuel Cherry, probably at the end of the 1780s; son Isaac, born in 1773, died before 1850, and married Nancy Hooten & Zilpha Musgrave; daughter Elizabeth, born in 1775, married William Goodman; daughter Rachel, born in 1776, married James Woodward; daughter Mary, born in 1779, married _____ Worrell. Not all of William Bizzell's children were named in his will. Son James Bizzell, not named, was born in Nansemond Co VA in 1760 and married Mary Bowden on 9 January 1781 in Duplin Co; she was a daughter of Bryan Bowden of Duplin Co. James' children were: Elizabeth, born in 1785; Elijah, born in 1787; Catherine, born in 1788; Sarah, born in 1789; Nancy, born in 1790; James, born in 1791; Samuel, born in 1797; daughter Molesey, born in 1798; and Alesy, born in 1798 (probably a twin of Molesey).

William Bizzell patented 90 acres in Duplin Co on 22 July 1774, land on the north side of Goshen Swamp and on the east side of White Oak branch near Nicholas Bowden's plantation, and joining Blanchard's and Bizzell's land (Grant 8341, page 8). Therefore, William Bizzell was of an age to be the father of Lemuel Cherry's wife Sarah Bizzell, and lived close to Lemuel's father Willis W Cherry. William Bizzell's 6 August 1800 Duplin Co will named wife Hanner, some grandchildren, and sons and daughters. One named daughter was "Sarah Cherry." We can be sure that this Sarah Cherry was Lemuel's wife because there were only two Bizzell families in Duplin Co in 1784: James Bizzell and William Bizzell, and James was a son of William; William lived next to Willis W Cherry; Willis provided the bond for the 1781 marriage between James Bizzell and Mary Bowden. William Bizzell's 6 August 1800 Duplin Co will named his wife Hannah, daughter Sarah Cherry, son Hardy Bizzell, and other children and grandchildren. Therefore, because William was a grandfather, and most of his children were married adults, he was of an age to be Lemuel's father-in-law. And Willis provided the bond for the marriage of Sarah Bizzell to James Hurst in Duplin Co on 8 November 1781. This could not be Lemuel's wife since Lemuel's wife was born in 1771; Sarah of the 1781 marriage must have been a widowed daughter-in-law of William Bizzell, and Willis Cherry provided the bond for his neighbor's widow. William's daughter, named in his 1800 will, was Sarah Cherry, not Sarah Hurst. (68,99, B,105,1088,C, 35maeijnq)

Source:
The Cherry Families Of Early Norfolk Co Virginia And Northeast North Carolina, compiled By John E Young, John H Cherry And Others
 
CHERRY, Lemuel (I40939)
 
124 Lemuel Cherry [C1a8p4], son of Willis W Cherry and Sarah _____ of Duplin Co NC, was born in 1779 in Duplin Co (he was age 71 in the 1850 Duplin Co census). Lemuel was named in his father's will, and at times was called "Lamb." Lemuel married Sarah Bizzell (per source 99), his neighbor, and daughter of William Bizzell and Hannah _____, about the end of the 1790s. She was born in 1771, and must have died within a year or two, because Lemuel married Rockselena Duncan in Duplin Co on 20 January 1801 (per mg records, Duplin Co). Bond was given by Hardy Bizzell, who was Lemuel's brother-in-law when he was still married to Sarah Bizzell, and the witness was William Dickson, the county clerk. Rockselena's father may have been Isaac Duncan who lived next door to Lemuel in 1790; there were also other Duncan families in the county at the time. Lemuel in 1810 and 1820 lived close to his brother William Cherry, of about the same age. Lemuel was an ensign in the 9th Company of Duplin Co and served in the War of 1812 (shown as "Samuel Cherry" in some printed books). His wife Rockselena was born in the early 1780s. He had five children by 1810 (all under age 10) and four slaves, seven children by 1820, and then ten by 1830. Rockselena died between 1830 and 1850, and in 1850 Lemuel was living with Elender Young, probably his sister's in-law. Nancy (Cherry) Young was living with Duncan Cherry, Lemuel's son, two doors from Lemuel. "Lemuel Cherry Died September the 6th 1859" per family bible record. Mr A R Hicks, age 46, was the administrator for Lemuel's estate. Lemuel's children were-

a. dau Cherry, b 1802-1804, married or died in 1820s. (35hij)

b. son Cherry, b 1802-1804 (35hi)

c. dau Cherry, b 1805-1810, married or died in 1820s. (35hij)

d. dau Cherry, b 1805-1810, still at home in 1830. (35hij)

e. William Duncan Cherry, b 2 Oct 1806 in Duplin Co NC. He married Ann J _____ on 6 February 1834. In 1830 Duncan was not living in his father's home. Ann was born in NC on 22 January 1815 (age 30s in 1840), and by 1850 they had seven children-

1. Eliza L Cherry, b 9 May 1835 (B)

2. Willis Wright Cherry, b 2 Feb 1837 in Duplin Co NC. He married Narcissa(?) _____ about 1856, and they lived a few doors from his brother George in 1860. Narcissa was born in NC in 1841. Willis was a Private in Company B, 8th Battalion. He died 6 July 1862. By 1860 they had two daughters-

a. Ann Cherry, b 1857 in Duplin Co NC.

b. Martha Cherry, b Dec 1859 in Duplin Co NC. (B,144,35knq)

3. George T Cherry, b 1838 in Duplin Co NC. In 1860 he lived in or near Mount Olive, and had married Hipsy(?) Ann _____ about 1859. She was born in NC in 1840. George was a Private in the 21st Company, 36th Regiment in the CSA. He was asge 23 in 1861. "T T Cherry dide August the 29 1868 in his 30 year" per family bible. They had a daughter by 1860-

a. dau Cherry, b Jan 1860 in Duplin Co NC.

A Mr Kind... Tou... (?), age 66, was living with George and Hipsy in 1860. (35nq, 144)

4. Elisha James Cherry, b 12 Feb 1840. He served as a Private Company E, 20th Regiment of the CSA, and was age 21 in 1861 in the army. He was the E J Cherry, born in NC in 1840, who was living in Wayne Co in 1880. Elisha married Joanna Armstrong in Wilson Co on 6 April 1870. They lived in Wilson Co in 1870, and Wayne Co in 1880. She was born in NC in 1850. Elisha also Mary Elizabeth Rogers at Pink Hll, Lenoir Co on 9 October 1898; they lived at Trent, Lenoir Co in 1900, then were back at Wolfscrape, Duplin Co in 1910. In 1920 they were at Brogden, Wayne Co. Elisha died 2 February 1922 at Mount Olive, Wayne Co, age "81 years, 11 months,19 days." His death record named his father as Duncan Cherry. "F A Jones" was the informant for his death certificate. Elisha was buried in his family cemetery in Wayne Co. Mary E Rogers was born 7 February 1840 in NC, daughter of Curtis Rogers and Mary Walter, and died 15 June 1918 at Wolfscrape, Duplin Co. She was buried in Seven Springs Methodist Church Cemetery in Wayne Co. William A Cherry was the informant for her death certificate. Elisha had two children by 1880-

a. Leah June Cherry, b 1875 (396s)

b. Roxanna Cherry, b 1879. Her great grandmother was Rockselena Duncan, which might explain the rare name (for the 19th Century) of Roxanna. (W,144,35k,396s)

5. William Augustus Cherry, b 15 Jul 1844. He served as a Private in Company E, 20th regiment of the CSA, and was age 16 in 1861. He was the W A Cherry who was living in Wayne Co in 1880. W A was married to Emily _____, born in NC in 1842, and they had four children-

a. Luellen Cherry, b 1867 (396s)

b. George Cherry, 1872 (396s)

c. James Cherry, b 1875 (396s)

d. Kate C Cherry, b 1878 (396s) (144,396s

6. Daniel Columbus Cherry, b 24 Dec 1846. He was a Private in the 36th Regiment in the CSA. He was age 15 in 1861. (B,144)

7. Briant W Cherry, b 24 Dec 1848 (born 1842 per 1880 census). He married Julia _____ about 1876 and in 1880 they were living in Duplin Co. Julia was born in NC in 1850. The had a child by 1880-

a. Leonidas Cherry, b 1877 in Duplin Co NC. (35s) (B,35s)

A Nancy Young, age 60 and born in NC, was living with Duncan and his wife in 1850. Nancy was probably Duncan's aunt, Nancy Cherry, who married a Mr Young. (B,35hijknp)

f. George Washington Cherry, b 1810

g. dau Cherry, b 1815-1820, was still at home in 1830. (35ij)

h. dau Cherry, b 1815-1820, was still at home in 1830. (35ij)

i. dau Cherry, b 1821-1825 (35j)

William Dickson was the county clerk in 1779, 1784, 1786, 1801, and perhaps in other years. William Parker, age 17, was living with Lemuel and Elender in 1850. A R Hicks, the administrator of Lemuel's estate, was married to Athamesia _____. She was born in 1816, and by 1860 had nine children aged between 19 years and 10 months.

In 1784 there were only two Bizzell families, and in the same district as Lemuel's father's home. They were: William Bizzell (next door to Willis) with two males under age 21 (or one male under 21, one between 21 and 60, and one ? William ? over age 60) and four females; and James Bizzell with a boy under age 21 and two females. William Bizzell and his wife Hannah (called "Hanner" in William's will) moved from VA to Edgecombe Co NC in 1763, and on to Duplin Co in 1772. They settled on the north side of Goshen Swamp, and the east side of White Oak Branch. They had the following children: son James, born 1760, died in 1822, married Mary Bowden; son Arthur, born 1762, died in 1822, married Elizabeth Ann Turner; daughter Nancy, born in 1764, never married, and died in 1830; daughter Patty was born in 1765, married _____ Worrell; son Hardy, born in 1769, died in 1848, and married Margaret Denmark; daughter Sarah, born in 1771, married Lemuel Cherry, probably at the end of the 1780s; son Isaac, born in 1773, died before 1850, and married Nancy Hooten & Zilpha Musgrave; daughter Elizabeth, born in 1775, married William Goodman; daughter Rachel, born in 1776, married James Woodward; daughter Mary, born in 1779, married _____ Worrell. Not all of William Bizzell's children were named in his will. Son James Bizzell, not named, was born in Nansemond Co VA in 1760 and married Mary Bowden on 9 January 1781 in Duplin Co; she was a daughter of Bryan Bowden of Duplin Co. James' children were: Elizabeth, born in 1785; Elijah, born in 1787; Catherine, born in 1788; Sarah, born in 1789; Nancy, born in 1790; James, born in 1791; Samuel, born in 1797; daughter Molesey, born in 1798; and Alesy, born in 1798 (probably a twin of Molesey).

William Bizzell patented 90 acres in Duplin Co on 22 July 1774, land on the north side of Goshen Swamp and on the east side of White Oak branch near Nicholas Bowden's plantation, and joining Blanchard's and Bizzell's land (Grant 8341, page 8). Therefore, William Bizzell was of an age to be the father of Lemuel Cherry's wife Sarah Bizzell, and lived close to Lemuel's father Willis W Cherry. William Bizzell's 6 August 1800 Duplin Co will named wife Hanner, some grandchildren, and sons and daughters. One named daughter was "Sarah Cherry." We can be sure that this Sarah Cherry was Lemuel's wife because there were only two Bizzell families in Duplin Co in 1784: James Bizzell and William Bizzell, and James was a son of William; William lived next to Willis W Cherry; Willis provided the bond for the 1781 marriage between James Bizzell and Mary Bowden. William Bizzell's 6 August 1800 Duplin Co will named his wife Hannah, daughter Sarah Cherry, son Hardy Bizzell, and other children and grandchildren. Therefore, because William was a grandfather, and most of his children were married adults, he was of an age to be Lemuel's father-in-law. And Willis provided the bond for the marriage of Sarah Bizzell to James Hurst in Duplin Co on 8 November 1781. This could not be Lemuel's wife since Lemuel's wife was born in 1771; Sarah of the 1781 marriage must have been a widowed daughter-in-law of William Bizzell, and Willis Cherry provided the bond for his neighbor's widow. William's daughter, named in his 1800 will, was Sarah Cherry, not Sarah Hurst. (68,99, B,105,1088,C, 35maeijnq)

Source:
The Cherry Families Of Early Norfolk Co Virginia And Northeast North Carolina, compiled By John E Young, John H Cherry And Others 
DUNCAN, Rockselena (I40940)
 
125 p. 365 Rome Book, settled Floyd Co. in 1854 DUKE, Jimmie (Jim) W. (I3639)
 
126 Sources

WikiTree profile Russell-4316 created through the import of RodneyTree12232012.ged on Dec 23, 2012 by Rodney Gross. See the Changes page for the details of edits by Rodney and others.

Source: S-1738591264 Repository: #R-1782501651 Title: U.S., Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970 Author: Ancestry.com Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2011.Original data - Sons of the American Revolution Membership Applications, 1889-1970. Louisville, Kentucky: National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. Microfilm, 508 rolls Note: APID: 1,2204::0
Repository: R-1782501651 Name: Ancestry.com Address: http://www.Ancestry.com Note:
Source: S-1739022970 Repository: #R-1782501651 Title: Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s Author: Gale Research Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc, 2010.Original data - Filby, P. William, ed. Passenger and Immigration Lists Index, 1500s-1900s. Farmington Hills, MI, USA: Gale Research, 2010.Original data: Filby, P. William, ed. Passenge Note: APID: 1,7486::0
Source: S-1739074994 Repository: #R-1782501651 Title: Ancestry Family Trees Publication: Online publication - Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com. Original data: Family Tree files submitted by Ancestry members. Note: This information comes from 1 or more individual Ancestry Family Tree files. This source citation points you to a current version of those files. Note: The owners of these tree files may have removed or changed information since this source citation was created. Page: Ancestry Family Tree Data: Text: http://trees.ancestry.com/pt/AMTCitationRedir.aspx?tid=47674996&pid=1219

? Source: #S-1738591264 Page: Volume: 276; SAR Membership Number: 55164 APID: 1,2204::1179020
? Source: #S-1739022970 Page: Place: Virginia; Year: 1673; Page Number: 139 APID: 1,7486::4102493
? Source: #S-1738591264 Page: Volume: 276; SAR Membership Number: 55164 APID: 1,2204::1179020
? Source: #S-1739022970 Page: Place: Virginia; Year: 1673; Page Number: 139 APID: 1,7486::4102493 
Family F565927011
 
127 Spouse:
Lucinda A Ballard McColister (1826 - 1923)

Children:
Thomas Marion McColister (1851 - 1947)*
Sarah Catherine Eleanor McColister McCune (1856 - 1937)*
Mary Elizabeth Josephine McColister Gober (1858 - 1925)*
Nancy Jane McColister Sims (1860 - 1899)*
Andrew Jackson McCollister (1862 - 1929)*
William Franklin McColister (1866 - 1952)*
Martha Ann McColister Bartlett (1869 - 1957)*

Siblings:
Sophronia McAlister Hewson (____ - 1890)*
Syrena Emaline McCollister Davis (____ - 1907)*
Andrew Jackson McColister (1825 - 1885)
Mary McCollister Summersgill Martin (1829 - 1895)*
Thomas McCollister (1832 - 1927)*
Jane McCollister Martin (1833 - 1870)*
William McCollister (1840 - 1907)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Concord United Methodist Church Cemetery
Carrollton
Carroll County
Georgia, USA

Maintained by: Wayne D. McColister
Originally Created by: Sgt Ed Elstan
Record added: Nov 27, 2011
Find A Grave Memorial# 81114833 
MCCOLISTER, Andrew Jackson (I11272)
 
128 !22 Mar 1704: This Indenture made the 22d day March 1704 between EDWARD (sic) HINSON of Parish Overwharton in county Stafford of the one part & ROBERT CARTER of Christ church Parish in county Lancaster .. Witnesseth that EDMOND HINSON for sum 7000 pounds of Tobo. & cask .. have sold Robert Carter 391 acres of land upon North side Potomack Run and bounded .. beginning upon the Clift by the run side & extending thence N=45 degrees E=266 poles thence N=45 degrees W=276 poles thence South 45 degrees W.~188 poles to the run thence down the run according to the several courses S meanders thereof to the beginning the tract of 391 acres being granted unto JOSEPH HINSON the ffather of ye sd Edmond Hinson by deed from the Proprietors office bearing date ye 16th day March 1694/5 as by the sd deed relation being thereunto had .. tract of 391 acres given to Edmond by his ffathers will .. Presence Thomas Waller, Edmond x Hinson James Weathers, John Trammill. At a Court held 13th June 1705 Edmond Hinson in proper person acknowledged this deed of land .. and EDWARD MOUNTJOY Attorney for Robert Carter reced the same and upon his motion the same was admitted to record & was recorded. Possession was delivered by Edmund Hinson into Robert Carter Esgr. by delivering by Turf & Twigg upon the land in the name of the whole this 12th day June 1705. Test Edward Mountjoy, Edmond x Hinson Thos. Garner. Know all men .. I Robert. Carter of Lancaster County having lately made a purchase of 391 acres of land upon N=side of Potomack Run in county Stafford made over to me by Edmd. Hinson of county Stafford by deed bearing; date 22d day March 1704 .. do appoint my good friend Capt. Edward Mountjoy & Mr. THOS. WALLER both of county Stafford or either of them my lawful attorney .. to receive livery seism & possession of sd lands .. 11th day April. 1705. Presence Peter x Masterson, Thos. Hooper, Thos. Hudson Robert Carter At a Court hold 13th June 1705 The Letter of Attorney was proved .. and ordered to be recorded and was recorded. STAFFORD COUNTY VA, DEED & WILL BOOK 1699 - 1709; THE ANTIENT PRESS, pp. 273-276.

!12 Mar 1706: #

!12 Mar 1706: To all Christian People Know ye that I JOSEPH HINSON of parish Overwharton in county Stafford .. for full sum 17000 pounds of good Tobo by me already reced of THOMAS ELLZIE of the parish Overwharton in county afsd .. sell 300 acres of land lying on North side Potomack Creek it being the lowermost part of a parcel of land conta. 600 acres formerly granted unto EDWD. ROGERS as by Pattent bearing date the 14th day October 1665 will more at large appear the land joining unto the land of CHARLES WOOD & extending up the said Creek side to the land of Mathews & so into the main woods for to contain the said 300 acres .. 6th March 1706. Presence Mary x Ballard, Joseph x Hinson 'Thos. Ballard. At a Court held 12th March 1706 This deed of sale was acknowledged by Jos. Hinson in person unto Thos. Elzey & MARGARET HINSON in her on proper person relinquished her right of dower to the same which is ordered to be recorded and is recorded. STAFFORD COUNTY VA, DEED & WILL BOOK 1699 - 1709; THE ANTIENT PRESS, pp. 362-363.

!29 Dec 1717: Mr. Thomas Elzey of Stafford Co. has 268 A. in said Co. formerly granted Mr. Gerrard Fowke at James City 15 May 1660 who assigned to John Rosier who assigned to Charles Wood who gave by Will to Joseph Hinson of said Co. Elsey bought of Hinson. Adj. land of Acton {Ashton} & JOHN BROWN, Potomack Cr., Thomas Fowke, Gent. 29 Dec. 1717. Stafford Co., VA, Bk. 5, p. 173. 
HINSON, Joseph (I69808)
 
129 !BIRTH:

S26 
NAIL, Mary (I9270)
 
130 !BIRTH:

S26 
FINLEY, Joseph H (I9294)
 
131 "An article was published in the HISTORY OF PUTNAM CO., MO (p. 1063)."Source: Ann Mack Research, 7th Gen. , pg. 8 HALLEY, Dinwiddie (I10287)
 
132 "James served in the War of 1812 and upon returning to Kentucky, settledin Lancaster.
"In 1852, James acquired the land on which he built a lovely Victorianhome called Anthlone Hall. It is still standing in the town ofWinchester, KY, owned by the First Church of God on East Hickman Street.
"James Halley acted as guradian to James Patton's estate in trust for thechildren of Henry Halley and Polly Patton Halley. Several accountings ofthis estate were found in Clark Co. records.
"James and Barbara Halley are buried on the Halley-Robinson lot inWinchester Cemetery."
Above quotes from Ann Mack Research, 6th Gen., pg. 1 
HALLEY, James (I10390)
 
133 "Sir Francis Kirtley was the progenitor of the Kirtleys in America. He was born ca. 1690 in Wales, and he migrated to the colonies in 1710 and stopped at Falmouth, Virginia. He brought with him the Kirtley crest which the motto is "Confide in God." While living in Falmouth, he was a merchant. He was a planter and a land speculator and by patent owned many acres in the Spotsylvania area. He was a member of St. Patrick's parish and in 1731 was appointed one of the first church wardens. At this time in Virginia history, the Episcopal church, the American version of the Church of England, was the original religious denomination of Virginia. In 1720, he served as captain of the militia and later served in the French and Indian wars. In 1721, Sir Francis married Margaret Roberts and they had six children. Sir Francis died in Culpepper County, Virginia, in 1763." RELATIONSHIP OF THE KIRTLEY FAMILY TO BULLITTSBURG BAPTIST CHURCH
By Elizabeth McMullen Kirtley, 1994

 
KIRTLEY, Captain Frances Paschel (I672075516)
 
134 "The Blackwater" PERSONS, John II (I2640)
 
135 "When her father died, his estate was quite comfortable and a trust wasleft to the Halley/Holley children. Henry's brother James Halley (115)served as guardian of this trust for devisees James, Richard, Betsey,Sibel, Polly Ann, Matthew Patton, John Patton and George Halley. Thelast settlement was made in 1828, five years after the death of Patton.Polly received a tract, not more than 100 acres, for a home, if needed.
"Henry and Polly were both members of the Bap[tist Church. They areburied together in the Halley Cemetery in Macon Co., MO." Source: AnnMack Research, 6th Gen., pg. 2 
PATTON, Mary Polly (I10279)
 
136 (book O page 532)  MORING, Nancy Ann (I672074962)
 
137 (Research):Birth source: DAR application of Nettie Lou Lorick
Death source: Will of Nathan Fowler, Sep. 14, 1815, Jackson Co., GA DB-A, Page 66-67 
UNKNOWN, Nancy (I7748)
 
138 (Research):other Birth Date listed as Jun 8, 1809 (W.S. Jones Family Tree Repository)
other death date listed as Mar 14, 1890 - Carroll County, GA

Jones Family Cemetery
Land District 3, Land Lot 182 G
W. Carroll Rd.
Carroll County, GA 
VELVIN, Celia Susannah (I7433)
 
139 *****************************************
The funeral of Capt. Geo. F. Cherry took place Sunday afternoon in Rutland district. The audience was one of the largest ever seen in Rutland. The funeral service was preached by Rev. Jno.W. Burke and Dr. J. Emmett Blackshear, conducted the Masonic services at the grave. He was buried in the family burial ground near his late residence.

The Floyd Rifles went out in full force to pay the last tribute of rspect to their former commander.

Capt. Cherry was 49 years old, and was a citizen of Bibb County nearly all his life. 
CHERRY, Captain George F. (I40899)
 
140 --------------Extract of 1900 Census of Dale Co. Al.------------------------
1900 Federal Census Dale Co., Al.
Page: 283B Sup D: 3 Enum D: 69 City: Precinct 12 Barnes Cross Roads Date: 01 June 1900 Enum: Henry R. Jernigan
Dwell: 09 Fam: 09
Name REL DOB AGE M/S Y C/L POB Father Mother OCC
DEAN Robert E. Head Dec 1870 29 M 05 ./. AL GA NC Farmer
Cordelia D. Wife July 1875 24 M 05 2/2 AL GA AL
Jessie Dau May 1897 03 S . ./. AL AL AL
Robert C. Son Mar 1900 2/12 S . ./. AL AL AL
Spuco Charley Servant Feb 1882 18 S . ./. AK AK AK
-----------------End of Extract of 1900 Census--------------------------- 
DEAN, Robert Elijah (I671964905)
 
141 --------------Extract of 1900 Census of Dale Co. Al.------------------------
1900 Federal Census Dale Co., Al.
Page: 283b Sup D: 3 Enum D: 69 City: Precinct 12 Barnes Cross Roads Date: 01 June 1900 Enum: Henry R. Jernigan
Dwell: 12 Fam: 12
Name REL DOB AGE M/S Y C/L POB Father Mother OCC
DEAN William L. Head Jan 1866 34 M 12 ./. AL GA NC Farm Lab.
Rebecca A. Wife Oct 1868 31 M 12 5/5 AL AL AL
Walter C. Son Sept 1888 11 S . ./. AL AL AL
George L. Son Apr 1890 10 S . ./. AL AL AL
Jimmie G. Dau Aug 1893 06 S . ./. AL AL AL
Mattie D. Dau June 1899 11/12 S . ./. AL AL AL
-----------------End of Extract of 1900 Census--------------------------- 
DEAN, William Lunsford (I671964901)
 
142 --------------Extract of 1900 Census of Dale Co. Al.------------------------
1900 Federal Census Dale Co., Al.
Page: 284b Sup D: 3 Enum D: 69 City: Precinct 12 Barnes Cross Roads Date: 04 June 1900 Enum: Henry R. Jernigan
Dwell: 33 Fam: 33
Name REL DOB AGE M/S Y C/L POB Father Mother OCC
DEAN Thomas Head June 1876 23 M 02 ./. AL GA NC Day Lab.
Kate M. Wife Mar 1882 18 M 02 2/2 AL AL AL
Jewell V. Dau Aug 1898 01 S . ./. AL AL AL
Lonny Dau Apr 1900 1/12 S . ./. AL AL AL
-----------------End of Extract of 1900 Census--------------------------- 
DEAN, Thomas Hampton (I671964909)
 
143 ---------Extract of 1910 Census of Barnes Cross Roads Dale Co. Al.----------
City: Ariton Enumerated: 18 April 1910 by: Albert D. McTodd
Sup Dist: 3 Enum Dist: 91 Sheet No: 3A Precinct: 12
Dwelling 50 Family 51
NAME................REL.......SEX...Race...AGE...MWS...Y....C/L...POB...FATHER...MOTHER
Dean.George.B.......Head......M.....W......41....M1....20.........Al....Ga.......SC
.....Willie.E.......Wife......F.....W......38....M1....20...6/6...Al....Al.......Al
.....George.S.......Son.......M.....W......19....S................Al....Al.......Al
.....Annie.E........Dau.......F.....W......18....S................Al....Al.......Al
.....Forest.B.......Son.......M.....W......16....S................Al....Al.......Al
.....Howard.M.......Son.......M.....W......11....S................Al....Al.......Al
.....Navie.D........Dau.......F.....W......08....S................Al....Al.......Al
.....Mattie.S.......Dau.......F.....W......05....S................Al....Al.......Al

----------------------End of 1910 Census Extract------------------------ 
DEAN, George Barton (I671964903)
 
144 ---------Extract of 1910 Census of Barnes Cross Roads Dale Co. Al.----------
City: Ariton Enumerated: 18 April 1910 by: Albert D. McTodd
Sup Dist: 3 Enum Dist: 91 Sheet No: 3A Precinct: 12
Dwelling 51 Family 52
NAME................REL.......SEX...Race...AGE...MWS...Y....C/L.....POB...FATHER...MOTHER
Dean...Martha.W.....Head......F.....W......73....W..........10/08...SC....SC.......SC

----------------------End of 1910 Census Extract------------------------ 
MCGEE, Martha Ann (I671964893)
 
145 -Note: Pedigree submitted by Michael Todd McVay is suspect because itshows James, Sr. and Elizabeth Simpson having children when he was over60 yrs. and Elizabeth beyond 50 yrs. They are: Sarah b. 1764, VA, Sybilb. 1766, VA, Francis b. 1767, KY, Mary b. 1768 and Susannah b. 1780. HALLEY, James(Very probable) , Sr. (I10291)
 
146 1/2 brother & sister Family F1310
 
147 10 Children O'NEAL, Maggie Elizabeth (I98)
 
148 10th Regt NC Continental Line Baker's Co. Military Unit 1778 Halifax Co, NC
Certified as a Revolutionary War soldier on Hitz's list. Military Service

A special thank-you to my father Thomas Herbert Dean who researched the line from Richard and whose work established Richard as a Revolutionary War soldier.

Four descendants of the Jeremiah Deans family line are 35-37 marker Y-DNA matches to a descen dant of Richard Dean b. 1760; that is, they and Richard Dean very likely share a common ances tor, as yet unidentified. I have speculated on all lines going back to a patriarch Thomas De ans. To see results, please go to http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~ladeanxx/dnaresul ts.htm.

NOTE:
That Thomas is the patriarch is speculative and does not agree with the Jeremiah Deans famil y genealogists' assumption; however, my prediction is based on what evidence I have at the mo ment. I am open to new information-hopeful that new information will surface. Richard b. 17 60 may have been the son of Richard, James, or Henry. For the purposes of connecting him wit h Jeremiah (since their descendants have a 35-37 Y-DNA match) I am listing my Richard b. 176 0 as the son of Richard b. 1739 or of James b. 1735 or of Henry b. 1740 with Thomas as the p atriarch..

1. Thomas Deens b. c. 1710 enters records in Edgecombe, NC, in 1744; the last record is 1750 . (This Thomas is not necessarily the patriarch unless evidence proves so.)
(the following are not necessarily brothers until evidence proves so)

2. James b. c. 1735 enters the records in 1759, and disappears after 1774 (d. REV?)

2. Richard b. c. 1736 enters the record in 1760; he may have died before 1782 census.

2. Daniel b. c. 1737 enters the record in 1768, and moved to Wayne Co (evidence in the fo rm of deeds and wills supports that these are the children of the Daniel in Edgecombe and Nas h Co, NC (http://wc.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=REG&db=extendedfamily&id=I10842) m. Eliza beth
3. Dempsy b. 1760 d. after 1827 AL (son of Daniel)
3. James Deanes b: ABT 1762 in North Carolina
3. Elizabeth Deanes b: ABT 1765
3. Daniel Deans b: ABT 1767 in North Carolina
3. George Deans b: ABT 1775 in Wayne County, North Carolina
3. Bartley Deans b: ABT 1775 in Wayne County, North Carolina
3. John Deans b: ABT 1777 in Wayne County, North Carolina

2. Jeremiah b. c. 1738 enters record in 1771(wc.rootsweb.com. Lamm, Ferrell, Williamson, Mer cer, Deans, & Etheridge - Wilson & Nash Counties, North Carolina Contact: Hunter Ferrell)
3. Temperance b. 1767
3. Sherrod* b. 1765 Enters documents in the 1790 census; appears in
Montgomery, GA on the 1797 Tax List. Dies in Harden, TN 1823 m.
Mary
4. Edmond b. abt 1781 [Was this the Sherod that went to Montgomery Co, GA, which
became Laurens Co, GA or was it an older Edmond, perhaps brother of Sherod? The Edmon d in Montgomery Co sold that land, which had fallen into in Laurens, GA , by 1804. He was b y 1804 living in Clarke Co, GA.
1816 and 1819 Alabama
Conecuh Co, AL 1820
Warren Co, Mississippi 1830 (died 1831)
[Montgomery then Laurens then Clarke before moving on to AL?]
then to MS.
4. Drewry Deans b. 8 Sept 1785 Is this the same Drewry who appeard on court documents in Na sh in 1813?
Nash, NC 1820
[Drury Deens] Conecuh, Alabama 1830
Conecuh, Alabama 1840 (died 1841)
* The above relationships between Sherod, wife Mary, and Drury, and Edmond are based on T. H . Dean?s research notes, on my own observations about generations and child-bearing years fo r women of the period, and upon Mary?s will (Uncle Joe?s Genealogy http://freepages.genealogy .rootsweb.com/~unclejoe/deanwill.html)

2. Henry b. c. 1740 enters record in 1774 May have died after 1790 census. No parentage ide ntified.

2. Thomas b. c. 1739 enters the record in 1775 Died 1797? (children?s names from will)
3. John Dean
3. Elizabeth Dean
3. Nancy Dean (Bowing)
3. Dinah Dean (Eason)
3. Mary Dean (Lewis)
3. Annas Dean (Joyner) 
DEAN, Richard (I41383)
 
149 11 children HANSON, Wesley R Quillan "Quill" (I64)
 
150 115 County Road 36 Riceville TN BARHAM, Rufus DeWitt (I11194)
 
151 1152 Slain by Llewelyn ap Madog of Powys. DE BOULERS, Stephen (I13119)
 
152 13 Mar 1749: In Name of God I CHARLES HINSON of County of Stafford Overwharton Parish being sick .. do make my last Will & Testament and first my soul to hands of God Item I give to ELIZABETH OLEFOR {Oliver} one feather bed & furniture Item I give to my loving wife JOYCE all rest of my Estate enduring her natural life & after my wife's decease I bequeath to Elizabeth Olefor of Lancaster County Daughter of MATHEW OLEFOR {Oliver} my Plantation on So side of Accokick run by estimation 100 acres. Item I give after my wife's decease to JOSEPH HENSON the plantation I now live on after my wife's decease the rest of my Estate to be sold & the money to be equally divided between my Brother Edmonds five children Vizt: JOSEPH, IZBELL, MARY, LAZRUS, ANN Lastly I appoint my loving wife Joyce be my sole Executor 21st February 1749/50. Presence William Mathews, Charles + Hinson, Garner Surges, Wm. Lunsford. At Court held for Stafford County March 13 1749 Last Will & Testament of Charles Hinson presented into Court by Joyce Hinson Exrx named proved by oaths of witnesses admitted to record Certificate granted for Probate ... STAFFORD COUNTY VA, WILL BOOK O; 1748-1767; THE ANTIENT PRESS, p. 86 HINSON, Charles (I69820)
 
153 13 Mar 1749: In Name of God I CHARLES HINSON of County of Stafford Overwharton Parish being sick .. do make my last Will & Testament and first my soul to hands of God Item I give to ELIZABETH OLEFOR {Oliver} one feather bed & furniture Item I give to my loving wife JOYCE all rest of my Estate enduring her natural life & after my wife's decease I bequeath to Elizabeth Olefor of Lancaster County Daughter of MATHEW OLEFOR {Oliver} my Plantation on So side of Accokick run by estimation 100 acres. Item I give after my wife's decease to JOSEPH HENSON the plantation I now live on after my wife's decease the rest of my Estate to be sold & the money to be equally divided between my Brother Edmonds five children Vizt: JOSEPH, IZBELL, MARY, LAZRUS, ANN Lastly I appoint my loving wife Joyce be my sole Executor 21st February 1749/50. Presence William Mathews, Charles + Hinson, Garner Surges, Wm. Lunsford. At Court held for Stafford County March 13 1749 Last Will & Testament of Charles Hinson presented into Court by Joyce Hinson Exrx named proved by oaths of witnesses admitted to record Certificate granted for Probate ... STAFFORD COUNTY VA, WILL BOOK O; 1748-1767; THE ANTIENT PRESS, p. 86 HINSON, Edmund (I69821)
 
154 1436, East Walton, Bockenham, Wiggenhall HOWARD, Henry of Teringhampton (I672075404)
 
155 1763, Mathew and Mary Edwards of Granville Co., NC to John Duke of Granville Co. for 27Pds & 10 Shil. 250 acres

1764, McCullock to John Duke for 25 Pds 100 acres in Orange Co., both sides of Flat River. ORANGE CO FORMED FROM GRANVILLE, JOHNSON AND BLADEN COS. N 1751

1765, John Duke deeded 100 acres in Orange Co., NC.

1770, John Duke of Orange Co., NC to John Hunter for 35 Pds, 100 acres
in Orange Co., NC

1776-78, John served as Private in Rev.

1779, John Duke to Julius King for 7 Pds 10 Shil. land in Orange Co.,NC on waters of Flatt River.

1781-82, He enlisted as Private then was Sgt & in Battle of Gate's Defeat. Son Hardyman was in service with him ( 9th Regiment of the Continental Army, Revolutionary War Roster).

1790, John Duke & sons William, Hardyman & Taylor were not in Orange Co., NC., they must have gone to GA where so many Dukes went.

179X, Orange Co., St. Mary's District in land adjoining son Robert

1832, He was allowed a pension for above service living in Orange Co. 
DUKE, John , Sr. (I3500)
 
156 1780-1790 COOKSEY, John Thomas (I9578)
 
157 1800-1810 COOKSEY, Unknown son (I9616)
 
158 1818
Joshua Newsom was in the Florida Indian war. He also was a miller. (Biographical Souvenir of the states of Georgia and Florida p611) 
NEWSOM, Joshua (I1225)
 
159 1830 CENSUS DATA: Richland County, SC page 406

"Rob. Dougherty" (note spelling) is shown with the following entries:
Males: under 5 =1
Males: 20-30 = 1
Females: 5-10 =1
Females: 20-30 =1

Commentary: Maybell Daugherty indicated on her mariage license that her name was spelled "Dougherty". It is possible that the 1830 census data is for James Robert Dougherty, Grandfather of Maybell Daugherty. The ages of the adults and children are about right. If so, then it would imply that James Robert Dougherty had an older sister that is not presently recorded in the family history.

1900 CENSUS DATA: per 1900 Census-Sidney James Daugherty_ Father and Mother were from NC 
DAUGHERTY, James Robert (I31)
 
160 1834-1835 NORTHCUTT, James M. Jr. (I9552)
 
161 1840_US Federal Census_Bibb County Georgia
Lists Absalom Jourdan (Note Spelling)
Number and Age of family members match

DEATH: U.S. Federal Census Mortality Schedules Index Record about ABSALOM JORDAN

DEATH: Surname: ABSALOM JORDAN
Year: 1860
County: BIBB CO.
State: GA
Age: 68
Gender: M
Month of Death: SEP
State of Birth: GA
ID#: MRT197_173113
Occupation: NONE LISTED
Cause of Death: DROPSY
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX 
JORDAN, Absalom (I35)
 
162 1850 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (spouse) (DEAN), Mary (I672003837)
 
163 1850 GA Census listed in M. Fortner household #102/432/roll 61 and on
page 591 of 1860 census. 
LANGSTON, Jabez (I2949)
 
164 1860 CENSUS DATA: The 1860 census data of Carroll Co., Ga., 10th Dist., p. 26, shows Hannah Archie (Archer) as head of household, age 50, a farmer, born SC., and real estate valued at $1000. Living with Hannah were: Jas. H., male, age 23, born GA and Dorotha A., female, age 17, born GA. Hannah is living next door to her brother, John Brown Bailey. Hannah is Hannah Bailey Archer, wife of Noah Archer who is believed to have died around 1842. She is shown living next door to her brother.

1870 CENSUS DATA: The 1870 federal census, Carroll Co., GA., Carrollton Dist., p. 26, shows Hannah Archer, head, age 49 or 59, born SC, and keepinghouse. Living with her were: James H., male, age 35, born GA and farming; Doritha, female, age 27, born GA; and James H. Wheeler, male, age 7 born GA.
NOTE: James H. Wheeler is the son of Sarah Ann Archer who married Alexander Wheeler.

1880 CENSUS DATA: The 1880 census, Carroll Co., GA, Georgia Militia Dist., 714, p. 20, SD=4, ED=32, shows Hannah H. Bailey Archer, age 71, widowed, born SC, and living in the home of her son, James H. Archer.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Carroll County Georgia 1853 Tax List
http://ftp.rootsweb.com/pub/usgenweb/ga/carroll/census/tax1853.txt
Archer Hannah 714 10
------------------------------------------------------------------
The Carroll County Times January 1884
NEWSPAPER ABSTRACTS FROM "THE CARROLL COUNTY TIMES", Carrollton, Carroll County, Georgia for JANUARY 1884

NEWSPAPER Issue of Friday, JANUARY 4, 1884
COWETA County News

Died, Dec. 24th, 1883, Mrs. Hannah Smith Archer. The deceased was born in Pendleton district, S.C. on Sept. 12, 1807. She moved to Newnan, Ga. in 1836 and there united with the Presbyterian church the following year. She lived a consistent member there until 1844 when she moved to Carroll. There being at that time no church here of that order, she then united with the Methodist Episcopal church, of which she lived a consistent member until her death, dying in full triumph of a gospel faith. Her funeral, conducted by Rev. A.C. Reese, at the Second Baptist church on Christmas Day, was an impressive event, and witnessed by a large concourse of people.

NOTE: The above Obituary provided by Cynthia Archer, a descendent of this Archer line.

COMMENTARY: At this time information is not available as to why Hannah H. Bailey Archer's name is shown as Mrs. Hannah Smith Archer. Research continues.

COMMENTARY BY CYNTHIA ARCHER: Noah Archer appears in the 1840 Federal Census in Coweta County. I assumed that Hannah moved after Noah's death to be closer to her family in Carroll County. Land Grant records I saw on GenWeb verifies their presence in Coweta County.
 
BAILEY, Hannah H. (I40727)
 
165 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Martha A. (I672025484)
 
166 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Louisa (I672025485)
 
167 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Emily (I672025486)
 
168 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Ruth (I672025487)
 
169 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Henry J. (I672025488)
 
170 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Mary E. (I672025489)
 
171 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Catharine J. (I672025490)
 
172 1860 Federal Census see notes: David DEAN (father) DEAN, Verdonia (I672025491)
 
173 1870 Federal Census: Crawford George DILLARD (father)
1880 Federal Census: Crawford George DILLARD (father)
1900 Federal Census see notes: Jefferson James DEAN (spouse)
1910 Federal Census see notes: Jefferson James DEAN (spouse)
1920 Federal Census see notes: Jefferson James DEAN (spouse)

Bethel Assembly of God Church Cemetery
DEAN, Georgeann Dillard 5 Nov., 1862 24 Nov., 1925

Name: Georgianne Dean
[Georgianne Dillard]
Birth Date: abt 1862
Death Date: 23 Nov 1925
Death Place: Ariton, Dale, Alabama
Death Age: 63
Marital Status: Married
Gender: Female
Father Name: Crawford Dillard
Mother Name: Mary Briby
Spouse Name: Jeff J Dean
FHL Film Number: 1908277

Alabama Deaths: Georgia Ann (Dean)
Name: Georgianne Dean
Death Date: 23 Nov 1925
Death Place: Ariton, Dale, Alabama
Gender: Female
Age at Death: 63y 18d
Estimated Birth Date: 1862
Spouse's Name: Jeff J. Dean
Father's Name: Crawford Dillard
Mother's Name: Mary Briby
Film Number: 1908277
Reference Number: cn 29778
SRC: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JDJK-SQ1 
DILLARD, Georgia Ann (I671953605)
 
174 1870 Federal Census: Crawford George DILLARD (father)
1880 Federal Census: Crawford George DILLARD (father)
1920 Federal Census see notes: Minnis Porter METCALF (spouse)
1930 Federal Census see notes: Jefferson James DEAN (spouse)

Alabama Deaths: Pennie Alice (Dean)
Name: Penny Alice Dean
Death Date: 16 Feb 1962
Death Place: Ozark, Dale, Alabama
Gender: Male
Age at Death: 91y
Estimated Birth Date: 1871
Father's Name: George Crawford Dillard
Mother's Name: Mary Ann Briley
Film Number: 1908970
SRC: https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/JFHW-WM1

Reference Number: 2907 
DILLARD, Pennie Alabama (I671953638)
 
175 1880 Jones County, GA census:
Flowers District 359, Handwritten page 31/stamped pg 370C
#288 ROBERTS, Green WM 58 Farmer Georgia/Georgia/Georgia

, Mary WF 48 Wife Keeping House GA/GA/GA

, Rebecka A. WF 23 Daug. Single GA

, Sabina J. WF 21 Daug Single GA

, John D. WM 17 Son Single Farm Laborer GA

, Eugien A. WM 14 Son Single Farm Laborer GA

, Charlie P. WM 12 Son Single GA

, Larance WM 9 Son Single GA

, Thomas W. WM 10 Grandson At school GA

, Ciseroe WM 9 Grandson

, Sallie S. WF 7 Granddaughter GA

JONES, Carlten C. WM 4 Grandson GA

, Joseph L. WM 2 Grandson GA

Cochrum, Henry BM 20 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Cleavland, Lewis BM 30 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Brown, Henry BM 21 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Mitcheal, Louiza BF 14 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA 
SUMMERS, Mary (or Broach) (I4253)
 
176 1880 Jones County, GA census:
Flowers District 359, Handwritten page 31/stamped pg 370C
#288 ROBERTS, Green WM 58 Farmer Georgia/Georgia/Georgia

, Mary WF 48 Wife Keeping House GA/GA/GA

, Rebecka A. WF 23 Daug. Single GA

, Sabina J. WF 21 Daug Single GA

, John D. WM 17 Son Single Farm Laborer GA

, Eugien A. WM 14 Son Single Farm Laborer GA

, Charlie P. WM 12 Son Single GA

, Larance WM 9 Son Single GA

, Thomas W. WM 10 Grandson At school GA

, Ciseroe WM 9 Grandson

, Sallie S. WF 7 Granddaughter GA

JONES, Carlten C. WM 4 Grandson GA

, Joseph L. WM 2 Grandson GA

Cochrum, Henry BM 20 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Cleavland, Lewis BM 30 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Brown, Henry BM 21 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA

Mitcheal, Louiza BF 14 Single Servant Farm Laborer GA 
ROBERTS, Green (I4254)
 
177 1883 MELBOURNE CUP - MARTINI-HENRI
1883 Melbourne Cup winner Martini-Henri was the first New Zealand-bred winner of the Cup. Named after a type of rifle, the 3 year old colt won by two lengths and his victory was so easy that his jockey never whipped him from start to finish. 
HALL, Martini Henry (I11314)
 
178 1930 Census for Moreland, Coweta County, Georgia listed William as Merchant - Store Service JONES, William Thomas (I7454)
 
179 1st marriage for Isham Family F1289
 
180 2 Feb 1742 Craven Co, North Carolina, British America

I, William Shephard Foster, planter, Craven County, for and in consideration of the sum of 250 pounds to me in hand paid by Thomas Smith of the same county, have sold to Smith a tract of land containing 200 acres, and lying in Accomack County in the colony of Virginia on the south side of a beaver dam belonging to a branch of Crooked Creek & bound Northerly by the said dam & branch Westerly by line of marked trees of the land that was formerly RATLEFFS and now belongs to Mr. Samuel Sanford which said line of marked trees are drawn from the fork of said branch South by West three hundred forty and four poles unto a corner tree thence bounded for the Southern bounds by a line of marked trees drawn Southeast by South seven degrees Easterly one hundred forty and two poles unto a corner tree thence for the Eastern bounds by a line of marked trees drawn South by East three hundred and eighty pole unto the said beaver dam branch. Wit: Nathan Smith, Thomas Ridgon Smith. Acknowledged 2 Apr 1743. N. Routledge, Deputy Registrar.

(1) North Carolina. Craven County. Deed Book 1-167, 2 Feb 1742. William Shephard Foster to Thomas Smith, 200 acres. (2) Weynette Parks Haun. Craven County, North Carolina Deed Abstracts: Deed Book I, Deed Book 5, 1707-1775 (Durham, NC: n. p., 1996), 21. (3) Laura Willis. Craven County, North Carolina Deeds --Volume One, ca 1730-1742 (Mayfield KY: Simmons Historical Publications, 2003), 45.
 
FOSTER, William Shephard (I671953554)
 
181 20 Apr 1745 | Patent Bk.5 pg.332 => Samuel Cherry | 200 acres in BeaufortCounty on the Nort h side of the Briery branch, joining William Congletonand the sd. branch | HC-3342

20 Apr 1745 | Patent Bk.5 pg.419 => Samuel Cherry | 200 acres in BeaufortCounty on the N. sid e of Briery branch, joining the branch and WilliamCongleton | HC-3754

22 Jul 1758 | Granville bk.11 pg.65 => Mrs Elizabeth Smith | 164 acres inBeaufort County in S t Thomas Parish on the N. side of Grindal Creek,joining a branch and the sd. creek | Wits: W m Mackey, Eleanor Mackey |SCC: John Cheary, Dove Williams | BF-294

Samuel/Lemuel (will 1754): These seem to be the same person, as 'Samuel'patents land in '45 , and there are many later references to 'Lemuel's1745 patent. The '45 patent was along Bri ery Branch, which is north ofTarr. Samuel Cherry died in '54, leaving a will; he left his B rieryBranch land to his son Cado (or Cade). Cade is not seen in the recordsafter this. Th e '45 patent land passed somehow to William Cherry,somehow to John Cherry, and was sold by Jo hn in '71 to Joseph Holiday.The executors were William Willis, who had land on the east ban k ofTranters Creek, and his son John. The witnesses John and Griffen Floydpatented land eas t of Tranters Creek in '56 (they were associated withJoesph and Moses Hodges, and John Lillin gton).

Samuel Cherry will 14jul1754 pbt. Sept Ct '54 - from Grimes Wills.
Sons: John ("manner plantation"); William (400 Ac. on the Beaverdam);Cado (400 Ac. on Brier y Swamp), Charles (land on Meadow Branch), Samuel,Solomon, George, Willis. Daughters: Eliza beth, Abigail, Patience, Mary,and Courtney Cherry, Rebeckah Hodges. Executors: John Cherry ( son) andWm. Willis. Witn: Wm Willis, Griffin Floyd, Peter Floyd.

CHERRY, SAMUEL.

Beaufort County.

July 14, 1754. September Court, 1754. Sons: JOHN (ŁSmanner plantationŁT), WILLIAM (400 acres la nd on the Beaverdam), CADO (400 acres of land on Briery Swamp), CHARLES (land on Meadow Branc h), SAMUEL, SOLOMON, SAMUEL, GEORGE, WILLIS. Daughters: ELIZABETH, ABIGAIL, PATIENCE, MARY an d COURTNEY CHERRY, REBECKAH HODGES. Executors: JOHN CHERRY (son) amd WM. WILLIS. Witnesses: W M. WILLIS, GRIFFIN FLOYD, PETER FLOYD. Clerk of the Court: WALLEY CHAUNCY. 
CHERRY, Lemuel Samuel (I40943)
 
182 2nd marriage for Isham Family F1288
 
183 4th Count of Flanders (958-962) and Artoi DE FLANDRES, Comte Baudouin (Baldwin) III (I671953263)
 
184 5th Count of Flanders (964-989) DE FLANDRES, Arnoul II (Arnold, Arnolph) "Le Jeune" Count of Flanders (I671953266)
 
185 7 Oct 1718 Accomack Co, Virginia, British America

19 May 1718 [date of instrument] - 7 Oct 1718 [date of probate] To grandson William Shephard Foster, son of John & Elizabeth Foster plantation in Accomack, said John & Elizabeth to have life int. in said land provided they care for my wife Mary Shephard. Friends James Kemps & Naomi his wife to see that my wife is well taken care of during her life. Elizabeth & John Foster Exrs. Witt: Simon Smith, James Wishart, Naomi Kempe, James Kempe - p. 144. [Source: Stratton Nottingham. Wills and Administrations of Accomack County, Virginia, 1663-1800 (Bowie, MD, Heritage Books, Inc., 1990) 58-59.]

 
FOSTER, William Shephard (I671953554)
 
186 7th Earl of Surrey. Killed in a tounament at Croyden, December 15, 1286 DE WARENNE, Wiliam (I1762)
 
187 8th Earl Aruhdel. Beheaded FITZALAN, Edmund (I1738)
 
188 9th Earl of Clare,Earl of Hertford, and Glouster
The Red. Knoghted May 14, 1264
Died childless, the male line of the Clares caame to an end. 
DE CLARE, Gilbert 7th Earl of Gloucester (I1765)
 
189 : I551298395
Name: Maniza HOLMES
Given Name: Maniza
Surname: Holmes
Sex: F

Marriage 1 John HILL b: in White Co., Tenn.
Married: 21 Jul 1853 in White Co., Tennessee 1

Sources:
Author: Margret Rhinehart
Title: White CountyMarriage Records
Publication: Van Buren Co. Historical Society, 1985
Repository: 
HOLMES, Maniza (I9394)
 
190 A follower of William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke. Served in Ireland. Received Rosconnel and Tullaghanbrogue with large grants of Westmeath. Constable of Carmarthen, Wales 1180- 1198. Sheriff of Pembroke 1208. Father of the St Legers of County Kilkenny. DE ST LEGER, Sir William Knight (I672075300)
 
191 A John W. Jones married a Sallie Johnson on July 16, 1888. Could this be
Sallie Ham? 
JONES, John William (I2518)
 
192 A MOTHER IN ISRAEL WHO HAS THREE CHILDREN ON THE FOREIGN FIELD
Biblical Recorder, Raleigh NC, Wednesday, December 8, 1915

[Photographs and the following sketch were kindly furnished the Recorder by Miss Fanny V. Harrill, Myers Park, Charlotte, N. C. ]

In the little town of Shelby, Cleaveland County, North Carolina, there is a ?Mother in Israel? who has three children on the foreign field: two sons and one daughter. This is a very rare case: doubtless there is not another in North Carolina. This is Mrs Jane Price Bostick, widow of Samuel E Bostick who died about six years ago. She is now eighty-one years old. She can attend church, administer to the sick, visit the neighbors and discharge many domestic duties.

Mrs Bostick is of Scotch-Irish descent, being the daughter of Benjamin Suttle and Sarah Baxter. Her grandfather, William baxter, came directly from Ireland and settled in Rutherford County. (two of his sons were Governors of their states: William of Tenessee and Elisha of Arkansas). Mrs Bostick is the mother of fifteen children, seven of whom are living. During the Civil War, though a very young woman, she must be needs be father and mother both to her family, and she gathered her children about her and taught them the ?Old, Old Story?, and instilled into them great and noble principles for Christian living, and throughout the youth of these children they had the Christian example of their parents, - and is it strange that God should have called three of these children to do His work on a foreign field?

The first child to go was Rev. G. P. Bostick, who went to Chins in 1889, and is now in PoChow. Mrs Bostick was in feeble health at the time (twenty-six years ago), and she felt as though she would never live until this son?s return. But her strenght increased as the years passed, and she has had the happy experience of seeing him return four times. More than this: her unceasing prayers for God?s work in the foreign field were answered by the call of the daughter, Miss Attie T Bostick, who went abroad in 1900, and is now in An Hwien, and Rev. Wade Dobbins Bostick, who went in 1909, and is now in PoChow. These two children she has welcomed home once each.

In the fullest sense of the word she is living daily in the work of these children. Her prayers are full of their work. She is well posted in missions, as well as the national affairs of China. This requires a gtreat deal of reading which she enjoys. But next to the reading of God?s Word, her greatest happiness is in reading the letters from these children to the receipt of which she looks forward with great eagerness.
 
SUTTLE, Jane Price (I04367)
 
193 A nun NIERADKO, Anna (I11226)
 
194 A second time all Cardigan was wrested from the Norman hands ; and things now wore so threatening an aspect that Henry II led an army into Wales in 1165, although, according to one Welsh account, Rhys had made his peace with the king in 1164, and had even visited him in England. The causes assigned by the Welsh chronicle for this fresh outbreak of hostility are that Henry failed to keep his promises ? presumably of restitution ? and secondly that Roger, earl of Clare, was honourably receiving Walter, the murderer of Rhys's nephew Einion. For the third time we now read that Cardigan was overrun and the Norman castles burnt; but it is possible that the events assigned by the 'Annales Cambrę' to the year 1165 are the same as those assigned by the 'Brut y Tywysogion' to 1163. DE CLARE, Roger 2nd Earl of Hertford (I672075682)
 
195 A SHORT HISTORY OF FONMON CASTLE AND THE FAMILIES WHO HAVE LIVED THERE

At the beginning

No one quite knows when the site at Fonmon was first occupied. The legend that one Oliver St John came with Fitzhamon into Glamorgan around 1090, as one of the Twelve Knights, is clearly false, as can be seen from the following notes.

There is some evidence of a timber structure prior to the first indications of stone building dating from around 1180. The first stone castle was almost certainly raised by one Adam de Port (later, Adam de St John). The de Port?s were great lords under the early Normans. Adam?s great grandfather, Hugh de Port having come over in 1066, ended up Lord of Basing (as in Basingstoke) and held 53 other manors in Hampshire, 13 in Kent, and more back in Normandy.
Adam, as Lord of Basing, married Mabel the heiress to the French St. John family. They had three children Alice, William, and Robert. Alice was born in Pembroke so there was obviously a Welsh connection by then, and family history says that the Fonmon manor, amounting to 900 acres, was bought as a ?knight?s fee? for either William or Robert, the holding owing allegiance to the Umphreville?s, Lords of the neighboring manor of Penmark. Again without much evidence, the story is that Robert died young, so William inherited both Basing and Fonmon.

Adam de Port meanwhile had taken the surname of his wife, the St John heiress, so that Fonmon is more associated with the name St. John than de Port. The noble house of St. John is today represented by Anthony, 22nd Lord St John of Bletsoe; Henry, 8th Viscount Bolingbroke and 9th Viscount St. John of the Lydiard Tregoze branch, and Sir Walter St. John-Mildmay, 11th Baronet of Farley.

The stone castle initially consisted of a single block just 8m x 13m placed above a steep ravine, conveniently with water beneath. This would have likely been surrounded by further stone walls and timber outbuildings, to form a generally defensible whole.

Additions were then made in the early/mid 13th C including a square tower to the south and a round tower adjoining the main block. Eventually the curtain wall joining the north and south ranges was filled in to give an approximately ?U? shaped castle with a courtyard extending to the West beyond the hollow of the ?U?. A substantial tithe barn was added, later converted for carriage storage, and used today as stables and garaging.

By the late 13th C. the St. Johns had lost Basing with William being noted as marrying Isobel Combmartin in 1266 at ?Faumont? in Wales, and their grandson being styled Sir John St. John, Castle Faumont, Glamorganshire. He made an advantageous marriage to Elizabeth Umfreville the heiress to Penmark, thus securing himself as the principal land holder in the area.

The family status and the castle itself, then remained very much unchanged for around 150 years.

From the Wars of the Roses to the Civil War

In 1425 Sir Oliver St. John married Margaret Beauchamp heiress to Bletsoe in Bedfordshire. After his death in 1437, Margaret married John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, grandson of John of Gaunt, 1stDuke of Lancaster. This catapulted the family (Margaret and Oliver had had six children) into the heart of the Wars of the Roses. By the end in 1485, her grandson Henry Tudor triumphed, becoming King Henry VII of England, with Margaret?s St. John children as his uncles and aunts, and their children as first cousins.

Sir John St John, Oliver and Margaret?s eldest son, eventually inherited Fonmon, Bletsoe and Lydiard Tregoze, the Beauchamp property in Wiltshire, so unsurprisingly ceased to live at Fonmon and the castle was occupied by tenants from amongst the Welsh gentry.

At some point in the early 16th century a short north wing was added built over a characteristic barrel vaulted semi-basement.

Perhaps more surprising given the turbulent times that followed, the St Johns maintained their status being enobled as Lords St John of Bletsoe in 1558 and created Earls of Bolingbroke in 1624. Despite their high rank they retained Fonmon, although by then it was the hands of junior branches of the family. The estate map of 1622 by Evans Mouse is dedicated to Sir Anthony St John 2nd son of the 3rdLord St John.

Sir Anthony having no male heir, Fonmon passed to his cousin Sir John St John of Lydiard Tregoze. With the advent of Civil War the St John family divided, those of Bletsoe largely backing Parliament and those of Lydiard Tregose backing the King. Sir John, having lost three sons in the King?s cause, then had to pay reparations (fines) to Parliament, and so sold the Welsh estate in 1656 thus bringing to an end nearly 500 years of ownership by his family.

The later 17th and the 18th century

Fonmon was bought by Colonel Philip Jones the ggggggggreat-grandfather of the present owner. Sometimes styled Colonel Lord Jones, Philip was one of Oliver Cromwell?s right hand men. Controller of the Lord Protector?s household, member of the council of nine, an MP and a Privy Councillor, godfather to Richard Cromwell, his influence increased as Cromwell?s health declined. It was no wonder that an English MP was heard to moan ?We cannot longer have this country ruled from a small castle in Wales.?

As befitted a new owner of rising status, Colonel Philip and his son Sir Oliver Jones made addition to Fonmon. This took the form of a substantial north wing rising over three floors above cellars and a water cistern.

Colonel Philip survived both the Restoration and Impeachment largely through having had the good sense to refuse to sign King Charles I death warrant. He is listed on the ?regicide?papers as being ?absent upon his Welsh estates?. Being away at Fonmon stood him in good stead when Charles II regained the throne as the one group that Charles did not forgive were those who had actually signed his father?s death warrant.

The Jones? then continued to occupy Fonmon largely unaltered for several decades. Instead, as with the St John?s, they married well into the local gentry. Sir Oliver to the Buttons of Dyffryn, then two Roberts to the Edwins of Llanvihangel and the Forests of Minehead.

After a third Robert married Jane Seys heiress to the Seys? of Boverton, the estate had grown to nearly 8,000 acres stretching from Llantwit Major in the West to beyond Barry in the East; and from the sea to approaching Llantrisant in the north, although not all was contiguous. The Seys (or Sais) family were one of the oldest of Glamorgan with Jane?s father Evan claiming to be 21st in descent from Blethyn ap Maenarch and one Aeneas Seys said to have been ?given to the Conqueror as hostage for the good behavior of the people of Glamorgan?.

Robert II was a religious man and he and his wife regularly welcomed John and Charles Wesley to Fonmon. He died when Robert III was but a child and his education was determined by Mrs. Jones and the Wesley brothers. This proved a hard schooling, and as soon as he was able the young man escaped to Paris which he greatly enjoyed.

He returned determined to put his wealth to improving his home. He pensioned off his mother and Charles Wesley recorded ?Sadly our welcome at the Castle is not what it once was?; as Robert set to work to celebrate more earthly pursuits.

He employed Paty as Architect and Stocking as Plasterer to assist him in the modernization. The two rooms forming the original Norman first floor hall were combined to create a library/salon running the full width of the Castle East to West. This was then extravagantly decorated in the Rococco style and fitted with gilded mirrors from designs by Thomas Johnson.

Four rooms from the central range linking north to south were combined to make a new main hall, new staircases were installed and other rooms redesigned and redecorated. Finally he erected a sundial on the SE tower to celebrate the completion.

The fine work at this period has led Fonmon to have a Grade 1 listed status, and the family finds it ironic that if someone applied today to make similar alterations to a building dating from 1430 they would be turned down out of hand. He then remodeled the curtilage walls and raised the old Watch Tower in the SE corner of the grounds to be a folly tower alongside the carriage drive approach.
Finally Robert installed a new layout of gardens although sadly we retain no record of his plantings.

Unfortunately, as well as the excellent investment in Fonmon, Robert III also invested in racehorses and high living in London, with the inevitable result that he fell into debt and had to flee to France. Although he eventually returned to die peacefully at Fonmon, nevertheless large portions of the estate were sold and Fonmon has never really ?had money? since.

The modern era

Robert Jones III died in 1793. His son was a soldier who served in the Peninsular War and later as General Jones became Master of the Horse to the Duke of York. The castle, somewhat neglected, slipped into another 100 years of sleep. In 1880 the general?s son, Robert Jones IV made some minor further changes, adding two rooms to the South Wing; changing the principal entrance from the south front to the west ; and adding a new porch to the hall.

Robert IV?s son Oliver Henry had no children and the castle passed jointly to his nieces Beatrice and Clara Valpy. Beatrice never married so that Clara eventually become the sole heiress. She had married Sir Seymour Boothby and the castle is now owned by Sir Brooke Boothby their grandson.

 
SAINTJOHN, John (I672075592)
 
196 A SHORT HISTORY OF FONMON CASTLE AND THE FAMILIES WHO HAVE LIVED THERE

At the beginning

No one quite knows when the site at Fonmon was first occupied. The legend that one Oliver St John came with Fitzhamon into Glamorgan around 1090, as one of the Twelve Knights, is clearly false, as can be seen from the following notes.

There is some evidence of a timber structure prior to the first indications of stone building dating from around 1180. The first stone castle was almost certainly raised by one Adam de Port (later, Adam de St John). The de Port?s were great lords under the early Normans. Adam?s great grandfather, Hugh de Port having come over in 1066, ended up Lord of Basing (as in Basingstoke) and held 53 other manors in Hampshire, 13 in Kent, and more back in Normandy.
Adam, as Lord of Basing, married Mabel the heiress to the French St. John family. They had three children Alice, William, and Robert. Alice was born in Pembroke so there was obviously a Welsh connection by then, and family history says that the Fonmon manor, amounting to 900 acres, was bought as a ?knight?s fee? for either William or Robert, the holding owing allegiance to the Umphreville?s, Lords of the neighboring manor of Penmark. Again without much evidence, the story is that Robert died young, so William inherited both Basing and Fonmon.

Adam de Port meanwhile had taken the surname of his wife, the St John heiress, so that Fonmon is more associated with the name St. John than de Port. The noble house of St. John is today represented by Anthony, 22nd Lord St John of Bletsoe; Henry, 8th Viscount Bolingbroke and 9th Viscount St. John of the Lydiard Tregoze branch, and Sir Walter St. John-Mildmay, 11th Baronet of Farley.

The stone castle initially consisted of a single block just 8m x 13m placed above a steep ravine, conveniently with water beneath. This would have likely been surrounded by further stone walls and timber outbuildings, to form a generally defensible whole.

Additions were then made in the early/mid 13th C including a square tower to the south and a round tower adjoining the main block. Eventually the curtain wall joining the north and south ranges was filled in to give an approximately ?U? shaped castle with a courtyard extending to the West beyond the hollow of the ?U?. A substantial tithe barn was added, later converted for carriage storage, and used today as stables and garaging.

By the late 13th C. the St. Johns had lost Basing with William being noted as marrying Isobel Combmartin in 1266 at ?Faumont? in Wales, and their grandson being styled Sir John St. John, Castle Faumont, Glamorganshire. He made an advantageous marriage to Elizabeth Umfreville the heiress to Penmark, thus securing himself as the principal land holder in the area.

The family status and the castle itself, then remained very much unchanged for around 150 years.

From the Wars of the Roses to the Civil War

In 1425 Sir Oliver St. John married Margaret Beauchamp heiress to Bletsoe in Bedfordshire. After his death in 1437, Margaret married John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, grandson of John of Gaunt, 1stDuke of Lancaster. This catapulted the family (Margaret and Oliver had had six children) into the heart of the Wars of the Roses. By the end in 1485, her grandson Henry Tudor triumphed, becoming King Henry VII of England, with Margaret?s St. John children as his uncles and aunts, and their children as first cousins.

Sir John St John, Oliver and Margaret?s eldest son, eventually inherited Fonmon, Bletsoe and Lydiard Tregoze, the Beauchamp property in Wiltshire, so unsurprisingly ceased to live at Fonmon and the castle was occupied by tenants from amongst the Welsh gentry.

At some point in the early 16th century a short north wing was added built over a characteristic barrel vaulted semi-basement.

Perhaps more surprising given the turbulent times that followed, the St Johns maintained their status being enobled as Lords St John of Bletsoe in 1558 and created Earls of Bolingbroke in 1624. Despite their high rank they retained Fonmon, although by then it was the hands of junior branches of the family. The estate map of 1622 by Evans Mouse is dedicated to Sir Anthony St John 2nd son of the 3rdLord St John.

Sir Anthony having no male heir, Fonmon passed to his cousin Sir John St John of Lydiard Tregoze. With the advent of Civil War the St John family divided, those of Bletsoe largely backing Parliament and those of Lydiard Tregose backing the King. Sir John, having lost three sons in the King?s cause, then had to pay reparations (fines) to Parliament, and so sold the Welsh estate in 1656 thus bringing to an end nearly 500 years of ownership by his family.

The later 17th and the 18th century

Fonmon was bought by Colonel Philip Jones the ggggggggreat-grandfather of the present owner. Sometimes styled Colonel Lord Jones, Philip was one of Oliver Cromwell?s right hand men. Controller of the Lord Protector?s household, member of the council of nine, an MP and a Privy Councillor, godfather to Richard Cromwell, his influence increased as Cromwell?s health declined. It was no wonder that an English MP was heard to moan ?We cannot longer have this country ruled from a small castle in Wales.?

As befitted a new owner of rising status, Colonel Philip and his son Sir Oliver Jones made addition to Fonmon. This took the form of a substantial north wing rising over three floors above cellars and a water cistern.

Colonel Philip survived both the Restoration and Impeachment largely through having had the good sense to refuse to sign King Charles I death warrant. He is listed on the ?regicide?papers as being ?absent upon his Welsh estates?. Being away at Fonmon stood him in good stead when Charles II regained the throne as the one group that Charles did not forgive were those who had actually signed his father?s death warrant.

The Jones? then continued to occupy Fonmon largely unaltered for several decades. Instead, as with the St John?s, they married well into the local gentry. Sir Oliver to the Buttons of Dyffryn, then two Roberts to the Edwins of Llanvihangel and the Forests of Minehead.

After a third Robert married Jane Seys heiress to the Seys? of Boverton, the estate had grown to nearly 8,000 acres stretching from Llantwit Major in the West to beyond Barry in the East; and from the sea to approaching Llantrisant in the north, although not all was contiguous. The Seys (or Sais) family were one of the oldest of Glamorgan with Jane?s father Evan claiming to be 21st in descent from Blethyn ap Maenarch and one Aeneas Seys said to have been ?given to the Conqueror as hostage for the good behavior of the people of Glamorgan?.

Robert II was a religious man and he and his wife regularly welcomed John and Charles Wesley to Fonmon. He died when Robert III was but a child and his education was determined by Mrs. Jones and the Wesley brothers. This proved a hard schooling, and as soon as he was able the young man escaped to Paris which he greatly enjoyed.

He returned determined to put his wealth to improving his home. He pensioned off his mother and Charles Wesley recorded ?Sadly our welcome at the Castle is not what it once was?; as Robert set to work to celebrate more earthly pursuits.

He employed Paty as Architect and Stocking as Plasterer to assist him in the modernization. The two rooms forming the original Norman first floor hall were combined to create a library/salon running the full width of the Castle East to West. This was then extravagantly decorated in the Rococco style and fitted with gilded mirrors from designs by Thomas Johnson.

Four rooms from the central range linking north to south were combined to make a new main hall, new staircases were installed and other rooms redesigned and redecorated. Finally he erected a sundial on the SE tower to celebrate the completion.

The fine work at this period has led Fonmon to have a Grade 1 listed status, and the family finds it ironic that if someone applied today to make similar alterations to a building dating from 1430 they would be turned down out of hand. He then remodeled the curtilage walls and raised the old Watch Tower in the SE corner of the grounds to be a folly tower alongside the carriage drive approach.
Finally Robert installed a new layout of gardens although sadly we retain no record of his plantings.

Unfortunately, as well as the excellent investment in Fonmon, Robert III also invested in racehorses and high living in London, with the inevitable result that he fell into debt and had to flee to France. Although he eventually returned to die peacefully at Fonmon, nevertheless large portions of the estate were sold and Fonmon has never really ?had money? since.

The modern era

Robert Jones III died in 1793. His son was a soldier who served in the Peninsular War and later as General Jones became Master of the Horse to the Duke of York. The castle, somewhat neglected, slipped into another 100 years of sleep. In 1880 the general?s son, Robert Jones IV made some minor further changes, adding two rooms to the South Wing; changing the principal entrance from the south front to the west ; and adding a new porch to the hall.

Robert IV?s son Oliver Henry had no children and the castle passed jointly to his nieces Beatrice and Clara Valpy. Beatrice never married so that Clara eventually become the sole heiress. She had married Sir Seymour Boothby and the castle is now owned by Sir Brooke Boothby their grandson. 
SAINTJOHN, John (I672075590)
 
197 A trusty councilor of Henry VII; died on a Pilgrimage to the Holy Land. GUILDFORD, Sir Richard Knight (I672075241)
 
198 A W.W on 1871 membership list of Sardis Baptist Church.WILLIAM W. FAVER, an heir on Thomas's estate but not listed onthe Census Records of 1830, 1840, or 1850, which could indicatethat an error was made in the listing; and he could have beenborn circa 1830 and not been in his father's household in 1850,the first U.S. Census to list the names of the entire household.The name of W. W. Faver appeared on one of the earliestConfederate muster rolls of the Delhi Rangers in the WASHINGTONINDEPENDENT on December 20, 1861. The Delhi Rangers, composedmainly of young men from the Broad river section of Wilkes andLincoln Counties, were mustered in on July 13, 1861. The unitreceived designation as Company A, 15th Regiment, GeorgiaVolunteer Infantry, Army of Northern Virginia. This unitsuffered tremendously through the long, hard years of battle.Nearly fifty died, either from combat or disease, thirty werewounded, some deserted, six renounced their loyalty to theSouth, and twenty-five were captured. At Appomattox on April 9,1865, there were only twenty-five members of the companyremaining to surrender. Timing, age, and area indicate thatWilliam W. and W.W., the Confederate soldier are one and thesame, for in "WILKES COUNTY MARRIAGES IN WILKES COUNTY -- 1832 -1871, PAGE 138," W. W. Faver and L. I. Pope were married onNovember 2, 1865, by B. M. Callaway, M.G. FAVER, William W. (I7606)
 
199 A Who?s Who of Tudor Women
Kathy Lynn Emerson

The Howard children, according to a variety of lists, were Charles (1536-December 14, 1624), Mary (d.August 21, 1600), William (1538-September 2, 1600), Margaret (b.c.1544), Douglas (1545-December 11, 1608), Katherine (c.1546-1598), Edward (b.c. 1550), Henry (b.c.1552), Frances (c.1554-May 14, 1598), possibly a twin for Frances named Martha, Thomas (b.c.1556), Dorothy (b.c.1558), Anne (b.c.1560), Elizabeth (b.c.1562), and Richard (b.c.1564). Portraits: there was a portrait of Margaret Gamage, Lady Howard in the Pembroke collection in 1561.

MARGARET GAMAGE (1515-May 1, 1581)

Margaret Gamage was the daughter of Sir Thomas Gamage (c.1484-1515+) and Margaret St. John (b.c.1486). She was a maid of honor to Queen Anne Boleyn. She married William Howard (1510-January 21,1573), who was created Baron Howard of Effingham in 1554. According to one source, to celebrate their wedding, on June 29, 1533 in the chapel at Whitehall, King Henry VIII mounted a small battle on the Thames for entertainment. One man drowned and two more broke their legs while jousting. Since other sources give April 23, 1535 as the date of death of Katherine Broughton, first wife of William Howard, the 1533 date seems to be an error for 1535. According to Eric Ives in his biography of Anne Boleyn, it was during the late summer progress of 1535 that Lady Howard, one of Anne ladies who had not gone with the reduced court, was a ringleader in a demonstration at Greenwich in support of Mary Tudor. He says the matter was hushed up but that Lady Howard was sent to the Tower. This is highly speculative. The only evidence is a report by the Bishop of Tarbes to the Bailly of Troyes in October of 1535, which states that "citizens' wives and others, unknown to their husbands" protested Princess Mary's removal from Greenwich and some were placed in the Tower. A handwritten note in the margin says only "Millor de Rochesfort et Millord de Guillaume." Margaret was again at court at Easter 1536, when Lady Margaret Douglas confided in her that she had secretly agreed to marry Lord Thomas Howard. In November, Lady Margaret was sent to Syon and Lord Thomas to the Tower. Nothing appears to have been done to Lady William. Later, she was one of Queen Catherine Howard's ladies. When Catherine was arrested, both Margaret and her husband were arrested for misprision of treason. They were tried and found guilty of concealing her unchastity and later pardoned. Howard was Lord Chamberlain under both Mary and Elizabeth and Margaret was listed among the ladies of honor in 1558/9. In 1578/9, she took delivery of New Year's gifts for the queen. Her name is sometimes written as "Lady Haward."  
HOWARD, Margaret (I671953440)
 
200 About 1806 BAILEY, Sarah "Sallie" (I40726)
 

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