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 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 1 _FA1
2 DATE UNKNOWN
1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page
1 _MEND Divorce


Facts about this marriage:

Divorce Unknown 
Family F27
 
2 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Baron Despenser. Hanged, drawn and quartered at Hereford November 24,1326 on the charge that he was the homosexual consort to Edward III.

Facts about this person:

Alt. Died October 29, 1326 
LE DESPENSER, Hugh (I1740)
 
3 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Buried Greenwood Cemetary.

Facts about this person:

Alt. Born February 08, 1911/12 
SMITH, Fred Malcolm (I91)
 
4 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Elder of Primitive Baptish Church

Facts about this person:

Burial
Duncan Cemetery, Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, William Allen (I2090)
 
5 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this marriage:

Alt. Marriage 1754 
Family F224
 
6 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this marriage:

Alt. Marriage Abt. 1740
Sussex Co., Virginia 
Family F76
 
7 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

AKA (Facts Page)
Laura 
BENTLY, Frances Virginia (I1290)
 
8 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1746 
ADAMS, James (I1820)
 
9 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1808 
BARHAM, James M. (I2015)
 
10 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1874
Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, Eliot (I2321)
 
11 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1876
Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, Monty (I2322)
 
12 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1878
Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, Floyd (I2323)
 
13 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born 1880
Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, Homer (I2324)
 
14 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born Abt. 1572
Buttes Wadhurst East Sussex England 
BARHAM, Thomas , Jr. & Sir (I3611)
 
15 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born August 03, 1884 
BARHAM, William Cleveland (I2277)
 
16 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Born January 21, 1874/75
Ozark, Franklin, Arkansas

Alt. Died February 28, 1952/53
Ozark, Franklin, Arkansas 
BARHAM, Samuel (I2284)
 
17 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Alt. Died Abt. 1887 
STOKES, Phoebe (I238)
 
18 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening December 15, 1745
Albermarle Parrish, Sussex Co. Virginia 
STOKES, Agnes (I1343)
 
19 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening December 26, 1597
Suffolk,England 
BARHAM, Robert , Jr (I382)
 
20 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening June 12, 1768 
BARHAM, Lucy (Polly) (I300)
 
21 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening June 13, 1742
Albermarle Parrish, Sussex Co. Virginia 
STOKES, Lucy (I1342)
 
22 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening March 13, 1747/48
Surry Co. Virginia 
STOKES, Lydia (I1339)
 
23 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening March 27, 1763 
BARHAM, Martha (Patty ) (I296)
 
24 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening May 26, 1631 
BARHAM, Susan (I399)
 
25 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening October 12, 1740
Albermarle Parrish, Sussex Co. Virginia 
STOKES, Elizabeth (I1340)
 
26 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Christening October 13, 1577
Broughton, Kent, England 
BARHAM, Richard (I414)
 
27 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Divorced Bef. 1915
Erma Phetoma Faye Hughes 
BARHAM, William Bartlet (I2296)
 
28 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1
Buried White Chapel emorial Cemetery 
DILLARD, James R. , Jr (I205)
 
29 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1
No childdren 
VAUGHT, Robert Lee (I166)
 
30 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1
prev marriage:; Robert Gossett 
SMITH, Ruby Maybell (I96)
 
31 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1
two children died at birth 
SMITH, Charles Augustine (I135)
 
32 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 1893
Died 
FRY, William Lewis (I129)
 
33 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 December 1955
Died

Fact 2
married: Thomas S Hull/daug: Katheline 
FRY, Martha Jane Gay (I134)
 
34 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 June 1958
Died 
FRY, William Erastus (I107)
 
35 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 March 1962/63
Died 
FRY, Rufus Guy (I124)
 
36 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 November 12, 1912
Buried Denton, Texas 
WIGGS, I. Perry (I162)
 
37 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 November 16, 1932
Died 
FRY, Jesse Franklin (I119)
 
38 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Fact 1 September 07, 1962
Died 
FRY, Martha Ann (I121)
 
39 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

High Sheriff of Kent 1491 
SCOTT, William (I1636)
 
40 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

High Sheriff of Kent 1542 
SCOTT, Reginald (I989)
 
41 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Facts about this person:

Religion
Protestant 
ARGALL, Lawrence (I1605)
 
42 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Information on this family and their descendents was provided by Mrs.Alta Cowan, 11558 South 91st East Street, Bixby, Ok 74008. Informationobtained while interviewing members of the family.

Facts about this person:

Burial 1860
Hill Cemetery, Franklin Co, Arkansas 
BARHAM, John S. (I1970)
 
43 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Nellie Laureen Darr - 10th Child Buried October 04, 1969 GreenwoodCemetery, Chattanooga, Tn

Facts about this person:

Fact 1 August 25, 1965
Died-Jeames R. Dillard, Jr -Born December 0,1921 
DARR, Nellie Laureen O'Neal (I95)
 
44 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Original Birth Cert - Tenn File number #D-479051 lists Sarah EmilySturm,mothers name Barkley
Uncle's name - W. S. Barkley
Not Verified: Sarah's parents John Sturm were killed in an auto accidentunkn date and she was raised by her uncle: W.S. Barkley. She also statedthat she was related to Albin Barkley, Vice President of U.S.

Facts about this person:

Fact 1
SS # 409-18-9688

Fact 2
aka=Sarah Emily (Dolly) Barkley 
BARKLEY, Sarah Emily (I93)
 
45 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Owned a Filling Station, Houston, Tx- abt. 1928
Master Mechanic for Ford Motor Co- Chattanooga,Tn- abt 1940
Purchased 80 acres in Valleyhead, Ala,Dekalb Cty,, from John E. andMinnie Phillips- November 28,1940
Description: Beginning at the northeast corner of the 1/4 of thenorthwest 1/4 of Section 5,Township 5,
Range 10; running thence South sixty (60) poles, from thence Westparallel with the township line
about 220 rods, to the top of the ridge; thence North with top ofridge to township line; thence East
with the township line to the place of beginning.
This is the same property that was conveyed by Columbus A.Phillips,,to John E. Phillips by deed
dated December 21, 1923, which deed is found recorded in Volume 55of Deed Records; page 562,
of the Judge of Probate of Dekalb County.
He farmed the land in the summer and worked for Ford in Chattanoogain the winter
Fred R. obtained his SS card in El Paso, Texas on December 4, 1936, hisaddress was Route 1, Box 27,El Paso. His work address was Casber (?)Motor Company at 601 Wyoming Street, El Paso.

Facts about this person:

Fact 1
Was a Master Mechanic for Ford Co.Chattanooga,Tn

Fact 2 December 04, 1936
SS # 453-07-0956 
SMITH, Fred Robert (I94)
 
46 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Rufus was 53 when he died in 1920 in Greene Co.Tn per Tennessee DeathRecords-Greene Co. Pt. 3 (F-I) #388
Rufus's twin died at birth

Facts about this person:

Fact 1 1920
Died, twin died at birth 
FRY, Rufus Dewitt , Jr. (I131)
 
47 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Samuel was Knighted June 26, 1622. Came to Virginia in 1609 as a trader.

Facts about this person:

Knighted June 26, 1622 
ARGALL, Samuel (I1569)
 
48 1 _FA1
2 PLAC See Note Page


Two of their children died at birth

Facts about this person:

Fact 1 November 10, 1939
Died

Fact 2
two childred died at birth 
FRY, Rebecca Ann (I130)
 
49 1 _MEND Private Family F50
 
50 1 _MEND Private Family F51
 
51 1 _MEND Private Family F71
 
52 1 _MEND Private Family F294
 
53 1 _MEND Private Family F295
 
54 1 _MEND Private Family F401
 
55 1 _MEND Private Family F411
 
56 1 _MEND Private Family F885
 
57 1 _MEND Private Family F906
 
58 MUSTER ROLL OF COMPANY D, 30th REGIMENT
GEORGIA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
ARMY OF TENNESSEE
C. S. A.
BIBB COUNTY, GEORGIA
HUGUENIN RIFLES

Jennings, William H. 3d Corporal September 25,1861 .

Appointed 2d Corporal in 1862 ; 5th Sergeant May 14,
1862 .

Captured at Nashville, Tenn. December 16,1864 .
Released at Camp Chase, O. June 12,1865 .

(Born in Bibb County, Ga. in 1844.)

This company left Camp Hardee near Savannah, Ga. for Jacksonville, Fla. October 4, 1862 , and returned October l5th.

Left Camp again, by order of Gen Mercer,
October 27th, for Coosawhatchie, S. C, and returned Nov 24,1862 .

Left Camp Young, Ga. December 14,1862 , and
arrived at Wilmington, N. C. December 19, 1862 .
 
JENNINGS, William H (I74)
 
59
Bruce died at 3 mos. of age 
FRY, Bruce (I122)
 
60
Jesse and Florence did not have any children

Facts about this person:

Fact 1 1936
Died

Fact 2
married: Florence Hope/ No Childred 
FRY, Jesse Alonzo (I132)
 
61
Maggie was counted in the 1900 Census in Carroll County, Georgia

Maggie is listed as being the mother of 9 children, 9 living. However, only 7 children are listed in the house in 1900. Eula (b. 1884) and Maggie (b. 1891) are not listed as living with them on the census. Also, Alpha C is listed as married and the mother of 1 living child, but the child and her husband are not listed on the census.
 
HANSON, Margaret Jane (I7411)
 
62
Much is not known of James. He married Rachel (Rae) unknown while in theU.S. Army, moved near
Sacrimento, Calif where they had a grove of Olive Trees. Rae was a nursein a near by Mental
Institution. They had one Child, believed to be named James, bd unknown.
Facts about this person:

Fact 1
Poss. ss# 436-10-0034 
FRY, James W. (I111)
 
63
Sources:

Title: Maude Harris Garner in letters to Thomas H. Dean, 1982-83: Maude Harris Garner is the wife o f Dean Garner,
Publication: descendant through Lemuel and Rebecca Dean Cherry
Text: Pulastki Co, GA, Minutes of the Court of Ordinary, July 3, 1837-51
Muscogee Co, GA Minutes of the Court of Ordinary 1840
Minute Book 1838-51 Ordinary Court, Muscogee Co, GA
Abstracts of Deaths Reported in the Columbus Enquirer 1832-1852
Burials and Deaths Reported in Columbus Enquirer 1832-1872, p. 84
Marriage license of Lemuel Cherry to Rebecca Dean, Houston Co, GA
1830 Houston Co Census
1850 Muscogee Co, GA Census
Houston Co, GA,and Bibb Co, GA, Marriages
1818 Pulaski Co, GA Tax List
1820 Pulaski Co, GA Census
Annual Returns of Administrators Pulaski Co, GA, GA Archives Drawer 38, Reel 28, pp. 317-322 , 355, 356
Title: Maude Harris Garner on Estate of George Cherry of Pulaski Co, GA
Text: Administrators: Lemuel Cherry and Isaac Holmes (also referred to as heir and legatee in Pulas ki County Minutes of the Court of Ordinary dated July 3, 1837
Division of Estate among heirs and legatees:
(Listed in this order) 1837-38

Lemuel Cherry
Mrs. Ruth Cherry (widow)
Robert Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry]
James Cherry
Issac Holmes [son-in-law]
William I Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry]
Emily Cherry [m. Henry Hornady]
W. C. Cherry [ward of Lemuel Cherry [Wyatt?]
Henry Mashburn [son-in-law]
M. C. Cherry [Listed on another page of the same record as Mary Ann C. Cherry; 1850 Muscoge e Co, GA census shows a Mary Ann Cherry, age 20, in the household of Elijah Dean, Sr.]

Guardian of minor orphans of George Cherry was Lemuel Cherry (Minutes of the Court of the Ord inay, Nov Term, 1840, page 69, Muscogee, GA):
George W. Cherry ["W" for Wyatt?]
William I Cherry
Robert Cherry
Title: Savell-Head-Curran-McDavid-Barrett-Acker-Sharp-Parker Family Tree: Dale Savell
Text: ID: I2661
Name: Isaac HOLMES
Sex: M
Note: LDS Microfiche & James Lloyd Head Descendants Book

Marriage 1 Louisa CHERRY
Married:
Children
Lucinda Florence HOLMES b: 6 JUL 1841 in Houston, GA

ID: I2660
Name: Lucinda Florence HOLMES
Sex: F
Birth: 6 JUL 1841 in Houston, GA
Death: 16 APR 1921 in Tampa, Hillsborough, FL
Burial: Lake Carroll Cem, Tampa, Hillsborough,FL
Note: LDS Microfiche & James Lloyd Head Descendants Book

Father: Isaac HOLMES
Mother: Louisa CHERRY

Marriage 1 James Joshua HEAD b: 16 MAR 1839 in Henry, GA
Married: 21 APR 1864 in Houston, GA
Children
Claudia Lenore HEAD b: 10 OCT 1865 in Houston, GA
Holmes HEAD b: 26 JUN 1868 in Clinch, GA
Callaway HEAD b: 18 MAY 1870 in Clinch, GA
Luneta HEAD b: 5 JAN 1873 in Headland, Henry, AL
Pearla Maud HEAD b: 20 MAR 1875 in Headland, Henry, AL
Constance Blanch HEAD b: 20 MAR 1877 in Headland, Henry, AL
Lena HEAD b: 16 FEB 1879 in Headland, Henry, AL
Leona Lloyd HEAD b: 16 FEB 1879 in Headland, Henry, AL
Title: Census for Isaac Holmes and Family
Text: 1850 United States Federal Census
about Lucinda Holmes
Name: Lucinda Holmes
Age: 9
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1841
Birth Place: Georgia
Gender: Female
Home in 1850(City,County,State): Graceville, Houston, Georgia
Household Members: Name Age
Isaac Holmes 46 1804 NC
Louisa Holmes 39 1811 NC
William Holmes 19 1831 GA
Robert Holmes 12 1838 GA
Penelope Holmes 11 1831 GA
Lucinda Holmes 9 1841 GA
Larry Holmes 5 1845 GA
Charles Holmes 2 1848 GA

1860 United States Federal Census
about Isaac Holmes
Name: Isaac Holmes
Age in 1860: 56
Birth Year: abt 1804
Birthplace: North Carolina
Home in 1860: District 13, Houston, Georgia
Gender: Male
Isaac Holmes 56
Louisa Holmes 49
Penelope Holmes 18
Lucinda Holmes 17
Lancy Holmes 15 [Laney]
Charles Holmes 12

1870 United States Federal Census
about Robert Holmes
Name: Robert Holmes
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1838
Age in 1870: 32
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1870: Houston, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Perry
Robert Holmes 32
Julia F Holmes 25
Julia L Holmes 4
1870 United States Federal Census
about Charles Holmes
Name: Charles Holmes
Estimated Birth Year: abt 1848
Age in 1870: 22
Birthplace: Georgia
Home in 1870: Houston, Georgia
Race: White
Gender: Male
Post Office: Perry
Household Members: Name Age
Charles Holmes 22
Eliza Holmes 20
Simon Dupre 35
Title: Allen and Higgins Genealogy
Publication: http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=pennyallen&id=I301289  
Family F565968083
 
64
About Lady Godiva

Godiva (or Godgifu) (fl. 1040-1080) was an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman who, according to legend, rode naked through the streets of Coventry in England in order to gain a remission of the oppressive toll imposed by her husband on his tenants. The name "Peeping Tom" for a voyeur comes from later versions of this legend in which a man named Tom watched her ride and was struck blind or dead."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Godiva

Lady Godiva Buckingham, an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman, was the beautiful wife of Leofric III, Earl of Mercia and lord of Coventry.; She is known to have persuaded her husband to found monasteries at Coventry and Stow. The people of Coventry were suffering grievously under the earl's oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would ride naked through the streets of the town. According to legend, she consented to ride naked through the town on a white horse; Lady Godiva took him at his word, and after issuing a proclamation that all persons should keep within doors or shut their windows, she rode through, clothed only in her long hair.; Only one person disobeyed her orders to remain indoors behind closed shutters; this man, a tailor known afterward as "Peeping Tom", bored a hole in his shutters that he might see Godiva pass and immediately became blind. Her husband kept his word and abolished the onerous taxes. The oldest form of this legend is in the 13th-century Flores Historiarum (Flowers of the Historians); A festival in her honor was instituted as part of Coventry Fair in 1678.The oldest form of the legend has Godiva passing through Coventry market from one end to the other while the people were assembled, attended only by two female (clothed) riders. This version is given in Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover (died 1236), a somewhat credulous collector of anecdotes, who quoted from an earlier writer. The still later story, with its episode of Peeping Tom, appeared first among 17th century chroniclers. Whether the Lady Godiva of this story is the Godiva or Godgifu ("gift of God") of history is undecided. Comment

Story: Lady Godiva

Godiva or Godgifu; was born about 1010, a sister of Thorold of Buckingham (Sheriff of Lincs.); she is the Lady Godiva of legend, and apparently is of an old, noble family. One correspondent claims her father was Earl of Lincolnshire.
Lady Godiva Buckingham, an Anglo-Saxon noblewoman, was the beautiful wife of Leofric III, Earl of Mercia and lord of Coventry.; She is known to have persuaded her husband to found monasteries at Coventry and Stow. The people of Coventry were suffering grievously under the earl's oppressive taxation. Lady Godiva appealed again and again to her husband, who obstinately refused to remit the tolls. At last, weary of her entreaties, he said he would grant her request if she would ride naked through the streets of the town. According to legend, she consented to ride naked through the town on a white horse; Lady Godiva took him at his word, and after issuing a proclamation that all persons should keep within doors or shut their windows, she rode through, clothed only in her long hair.; Only one person disobeyed her orders to remain indoors behind closed shutters; this man, a tailor known afterward as "Peeping Tom", bored a hole in his shutters that he might see Godiva pass and immediately became blind. Her husband kept his word and abolished the onerous taxes. The oldest form of this legend is in the 13th-century Flores Historiarum (Flowers of the Historians); A festival in her honor was instituted as part of Coventry Fair in 1678.The oldest form of the legend has Godiva passing through Coventry market from one end to the other while the people were assembled, attended only by two female (clothed) riders. This version is given in Flores Historiarum by Roger of Wendover (died 1236), a somewhat credulous collector of anecdotes, who quoted from an earlier writer. The still later story, with its episode of Peeping Tom, appeared first among 17th century chroniclers. Whether the Lady Godiva of this story is the Godiva or Godgifu ("gift of God") of history is undecided. Comment

Story: Lady Godiva

Godiva or Godgifu; was born about 1010, a sister of Thorold of Buckingham (Sheriff of Lincs.); she is the Lady Godiva of legend, and apparently is of an old, noble family. One correspondent claims her father was Earl of Lincolnshire.

http://childsfamily.com/reunion/PS13/PS13_386.HTM

Om Lady Godiva (Norsk)

Godiva Hustru i Coventry til jarlen av Mercia

Godgifu eller med sitt mest kjente navn Godiva (ca. 990 ? 10. september 1067) var en angelsaksisk adelskvinne som i henhold til legenden red naken gjennom gatene i byen Coventry i England for å kunne be om at en urimelig skatt ble opphevet. Skatten var pålagt av hennes egen ektemann overfor dennes undersåtter. Det engelske begrepet «peeping Tom» for en som titter på nakne kvinner kommer fra denne hendelsen. I henhold til legenden var en mann ved navn Tom som så henne ri naken og ųyeblikkelig ble blind.

https://no.wikipedia.org/wiki/Godiva

http://fabpedigree.com/s017/f072571.htm

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLAND,%20AngloSaxon%20nobility.htm#Leofwinedied1023A
 
Lady Godiva of Coventry (I11079)
 
65
About Sir Richard Sherburn, MP

Family and Education b. by 1522, 1st s. of Thomas Sherborn of Stonyhurst by Joan, da. of Sir John Towneley of Towneley. m. (1) 1538, Maud (d. 10 Nov. 1588), da. of Sir Richard Bold of Bold, 5s. 3da.; (2) 1588, Isabel Wood, 1s. 2da. illegit. bef. m., also 1s. illegit. by Grace Ryddynge. suc. fa. 22 Sept. 1536. Kntd. 11 May 1544.1

Offices Held

Dep. steward, duchy of Lancaster, Blackburn hundred, Lancs. 1543, steward and master forester, Bowland and Quernmore 1554-d., dep. master forester, Amounderness 1560-1 and 1586-7; commr. chantries, Lancs. 1552, 1554, eccles. causes, diocese of Chester 1562, to survey crown lands, Lancs. 1576, musters 1577, 1580; servant of earls of Derby by 1555, member, council by 1561; butler, Lancs. 1559; searcher, port of Liverpool 1559; lt. I.o.M. in 1561; j.p. Lancs. by 1564-83 or later; member eccles. comm. in 1568; clerk of the market and feodary, Bowland and Lancs. 1582; dep. lt. Lancs. by 1585-d.2

Biography Richard Sherborn?s father died in 1536 while sheriff of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Holcroft acquired Richard?s wardship in June 1538 and shortly afterwards married him to Maud Bold: guardian and ward were knighted together at Leith in 1544. By then Sherborn had already been involved in an attempt to overthrow the liberties of the town of Clitheroe, four miles from Stonyhurst. He had licence to enter on his lands without proof of age and without livery in February 1544 and in the same year he obtained Holcroft?s interest in the lease of Wigglesworth in Yorkshire, formerly in the possession of Sir Stephen Hamerton, and he was probably helped by his former guardian in the scramble for monastic lands. He purchased Wigglesworth and certain former properties of Whalley abbey for £712 in 1558.3

Of much greater significance in Sherborn?s career, however, was his connexion with the earls of Derby. He followed his father into their service and held many offices under the 3rd and 4th Earls; he was an executor of the 3rd Earl?s will and his son, another Richard, was to marry Catherine Stourton, whose mother was a Stanley. Sherborn?s parliamentary career mirrored this noble patronage. His election as first knight of the shire to Queen Mary?s first Parliament, when he had barely turned 30 and before he had taken any significant part in local administration, was a striking tribute both to his own standing with the 3rd Earl and to that magnate?s early and notable support of the new monarch; and even though he could not hope to retain so exalted a place?which would be occupied on the next three occasions by the earl?s younger son?Sherborn owed it to the same pervasive influence that he was to reappear in three subsequent Parliaments. In two of these he sat for Preston, a borough monopolized by nominees, and in the third for Liverpool, where Derby?s influence was especially strong: Sherborn was, indeed, styled on the return for Liverpool ?knight and steward to the noble earl Lord Edward Earl of Derby?. Nothing is known about Sherborn?s part in the work of the House.4

Sherborn was to continue in the Stanleys? service after 1558 but he did not sit in any Elizabethan Parliament, presumably because of his reservations about the Anglican settlement. In 1561 he was one of the members of Derby?s council who sat in judgment on a dispute at Liverpool; described in the municipal records as the earl?s chief councillor, he was said to be a friend of the town. He accompanied Derby on his visit there in 1566 and his name appears on the burgess roll in 1572 and 1589. In 1562 he was mentioned as having taken, as Derby?s officer, £80 in duties from a Portuguese shipowner. In 1578 he was acting as Lady Derby?s agent in a dispute over Neroche forest in Somerset. He was deputy to the 3rd and 4th Earls as master forester of Amounderness. In July 1555 the 3rd Earl had granted him to the custody of Greenhalgh castle and park, and in July 1567 the earl added the stewardships of Bolton in Lonsdale and of the wapentake of Ewcross with the master forestership of the chase of Ingleborough in Yorkshire. He was to have accompanied the 4th Earl to France in 1585 as his treasurer, but was apparently prevented by illness.5

Sherborn was more than a trusted servant of the Stanleys. If he served them as lieutenant of Man, he also served the crown as deputy lieutenant of Lancashire when the 4th Earl of Derby was lord lieutenant. He received so many insructions from the central authorities to inquire into local disputes that he has been called ?almost a special investigator?; one such dispute concerned Richard Houghton (probably the bastard son of Sir Richard Houghton) and Sir Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicesrter. In June 1563 Sherborn purchased the manor of Leagram from Dudley for £1,619; it had once been leased to his father Thomas and was closely connected with his stewardship of Bowland.6

If Sherborn?s religion did not exclude him from active local service, especially as a deputy lieutenant of his county at a time of threatened invasion, it does seem that his sympathies were Catholic. He was judged unfavourable as a justice of the peace in 1564 and in or about 1588 he was deleted as a Catholic and a generally obnoxious person. The accusations seem to have had no effect and Sherborn remained in office. He is even said, most implausibly, to have been so favoured by Elizabeth that he was allowed to maintain a priest. The earls of Derby could no doubt have protected him but they could scarcely have secured him the offices he held if his Catholic sympathies had been pronounced. Four years after being thought unfavourable as a justice he was a member of the ecclesiastical commission and in July 1568 sat in judgment on eight leading recusants at Lathom. In 1585 he was one of the signatories to a document on ?the enormities of the sabbath?, a document apparently of a Puritan nature although Sir Richard may have signed as one concerned rather with public order than with theology. Certainly there was no special significance in his signing the Lancashire Bond of Association. Shortly before Sherborn?s death his son?s second wife Anne, daughter of Henry Kighley and widow of Thomas Houghton, was summoned before the Privy Council as a recusant; on that occasion she conformed but the Sherborn family was later recusant. Sherborn had been one of those who reported on the affray in which Thomas Houghton was killed.7

Sherborn died on 26 July 1594, having made his will on the previous 2 Oct. Amongst the legatees was Richard, eldest son of his daughter Mary and Thomas Fleetwood, himself the son of John Fleetwood? of Penwortham. Sir Richard Shuttle-worth, chief justice of Chester and a Sherborn connexion by marriage, was supervisor of the will. A memorial in the church at Mitton lists several of Sherborn?s chief offices, but does not mention his having sat in Parliament. He had begun the rebuilding of his home before his death and the work was completed by his son Richard. The house passed into the ownership of the English College from Liege in 1794 and is now a Catholic public school.8

Ref Volumes: 1509-1558 Author: Alan Davidson Notes 1. Date of birth estimated from first reference, but said to be ten at fa.?s death. Vis. Lancs. (Chetham Soc. lxxxi), 58; (lxxxviii), 264; C. D. Sherborn, Sherborn Fam. 27 seq.; Chetham Soc. lx. 267; VCH Lancs. vii. 5. 2. VCH Lancs. ii. 97-98; vii. 5; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 280-1; 1572-5, p. 92; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 24; APC, xii. 8; xviii. 386; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; HMC Foljambe, 25; DKR, xliii. 274; Somerville, Duchy, i. 467n, 491, 501; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 402. 3. LP Hen. VIII, xiii, xix; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. xxxv. 171; DKR, xxxix. 559; CPR, 1554-5, p. 330; 1557-8, p. 174. 4. PCC 38 Daper; Liverpool Town Bks. ed. Twemlow, i. 52a. 5. Twemlow, i. 165, 169, 313; ii. 831, 838; APC, vii. 107; xi. 49; Chetham Soc. n.s. xix. 76; lxxii. 30; Lancs. and Cheshire Hist. Soc. xcii. 51, 53. 6. J. B. Watson, ?Lancs. gentry 1529-58? (London Univ. M.A. thesis, 1959), 478; APC, xi. 89, 163, 191; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 538, 581; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 2, 12, 27. 7. VCH Lancs. vii. 5, 131; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; CSP Dom. 1591-4, pp. 159-60, a document tentatively dated 1591 but see H. H. Leonard, ?Knights and knighthood in Tudor Engl.? (London Univ. Ph.D. thesis, 1970), 256n; Cath. Rec. Soc. iv. 178-9; J. Croston, Samlesbury, 104-5; J. S. Leatherbarrow, Lancs. Eliz. Recusants (Chetham Soc. n.s. cx), 27, 32, 99; Harl. 1926, f. 80; APC, xxiv. 281, 334, 410; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. lxxxviii. 45. 8. Chetham Soc. lx. 267; T. D. Whitaker, Whalley (3rd ed.), 467; Ducatus Lanc. i. 161; Pevsner, N. Lancs. 239-40.

Family and Education b. by 1522, 1st s. of Thomas Sherborn of Stonyhurst by Joan, da. of Sir John Towneley of Towneley. m. (1) 1538, Maud (d. 10 Nov. 1588), da. of Sir Richard Bold of Bold, 5s. 3da.; (2) 1588, Isabel Wood, 1s. 2da. illegit. bef. m., also 1s. illegit. by Grace Ryddynge. suc. fa. 22 Sept. 1536. Kntd. 11 May 1544.1

Offices Held

Dep. steward, duchy of Lancaster, Blackburn hundred, Lancs. 1543, steward and master forester, Bowland and Quernmore 1554-d., dep. master forester, Amounderness 1560-1 and 1586-7; commr. chantries, Lancs. 1552, 1554, eccles. causes, diocese of Chester 1562, to survey crown lands, Lancs. 1576, musters 1577, 1580; servant of earls of Derby by 1555, member, council by 1561; butler, Lancs. 1559; searcher, port of Liverpool 1559; lt. I.o.M. in 1561; j.p. Lancs. by 1564-83 or later; member eccles. comm. in 1568; clerk of the market and feodary, Bowland and Lancs. 1582; dep. lt. Lancs. by 1585-d.2

Biography Richard Sherborn?s father died in 1536 while sheriff of Lancashire. Sir Thomas Holcroft acquired Richard?s wardship in June 1538 and shortly afterwards married him to Maud Bold: guardian and ward were knighted together at Leith in 1544. By then Sherborn had already been involved in an attempt to overthrow the liberties of the town of Clitheroe, four miles from Stonyhurst. He had licence to enter on his lands without proof of age and without livery in February 1544 and in the same year he obtained Holcroft?s interest in the lease of Wigglesworth in Yorkshire, formerly in the possession of Sir Stephen Hamerton, and he was probably helped by his former guardian in the scramble for monastic lands. He purchased Wigglesworth and certain former properties of Whalley abbey for £712 in 1558.3

Of much greater significance in Sherborn?s career, however, was his connexion with the earls of Derby. He followed his father into their service and held many offices under the 3rd and 4th Earls; he was an executor of the 3rd Earl?s will and his son, another Richard, was to marry Catherine Stourton, whose mother was a Stanley. Sherborn?s parliamentary career mirrored this noble patronage. His election as first knight of the shire to Queen Mary?s first Parliament, when he had barely turned 30 and before he had taken any significant part in local administration, was a striking tribute both to his own standing with the 3rd Earl and to that magnate?s early and notable support of the new monarch; and even though he could not hope to retain so exalted a place?which would be occupied on the next three occasions by the earl?s younger son?Sherborn owed it to the same pervasive influence that he was to reappear in three subsequent Parliaments. In two of these he sat for Preston, a borough monopolized by nominees, and in the third for Liverpool, where Derby?s influence was especially strong: Sherborn was, indeed, styled on the return for Liverpool ?knight and steward to the noble earl Lord Edward Earl of Derby?. Nothing is known about Sherborn?s part in the work of the House.4

Sherborn was to continue in the Stanleys? service after 1558 but he did not sit in any Elizabethan Parliament, presumably because of his reservations about the Anglican settlement. In 1561 he was one of the members of Derby?s council who sat in judgment on a dispute at Liverpool; described in the municipal records as the earl?s chief councillor, he was said to be a friend of the town. He accompanied Derby on his visit there in 1566 and his name appears on the burgess roll in 1572 and 1589. In 1562 he was mentioned as having taken, as Derby?s officer, £80 in duties from a Portuguese shipowner. In 1578 he was acting as Lady Derby?s agent in a dispute over Neroche forest in Somerset. He was deputy to the 3rd and 4th Earls as master forester of Amounderness. In July 1555 the 3rd Earl had granted him to the custody of Greenhalgh castle and park, and in July 1567 the earl added the stewardships of Bolton in Lonsdale and of the wapentake of Ewcross with the master forestership of the chase of Ingleborough in Yorkshire. He was to have accompanied the 4th Earl to France in 1585 as his treasurer, but was apparently prevented by illness.5

Sherborn was more than a trusted servant of the Stanleys. If he served them as lieutenant of Man, he also served the crown as deputy lieutenant of Lancashire when the 4th Earl of Derby was lord lieutenant. He received so many insructions from the central authorities to inquire into local disputes that he has been called ?almost a special investigator?; one such dispute concerned Richard Houghton (probably the bastard son of Sir Richard Houghton) and Sir Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicesrter. In June 1563 Sherborn purchased the manor of Leagram from Dudley for £1,619; it had once been leased to his father Thomas and was closely connected with his stewardship of Bowland.6

If Sherborn?s religion did not exclude him from active local service, especially as a deputy lieutenant of his county at a time of threatened invasion, it does seem that his sympathies were Catholic. He was judged unfavourable as a justice of the peace in 1564 and in or about 1588 he was deleted as a Catholic and a generally obnoxious person. The accusations seem to have had no effect and Sherborn remained in office. He is even said, most implausibly, to have been so favoured by Elizabeth that he was allowed to maintain a priest. The earls of Derby could no doubt have protected him but they could scarcely have secured him the offices he held if his Catholic sympathies had been pronounced. Four years after being thought unfavourable as a justice he was a member of the ecclesiastical commission and in July 1568 sat in judgment on eight leading recusants at Lathom. In 1585 he was one of the signatories to a document on ?the enormities of the sabbath?, a document apparently of a Puritan nature although Sir Richard may have signed as one concerned rather with public order than with theology. Certainly there was no special significance in his signing the Lancashire Bond of Association. Shortly before Sherborn?s death his son?s second wife Anne, daughter of Henry Kighley and widow of Thomas Houghton, was summoned before the Privy Council as a recusant; on that occasion she conformed but the Sherborn family was later recusant. Sherborn had been one of those who reported on the affray in which Thomas Houghton was killed.7

Sherborn died on 26 July 1594, having made his will on the previous 2 Oct. Amongst the legatees was Richard, eldest son of his daughter Mary and Thomas Fleetwood, himself the son of John Fleetwood? of Penwortham. Sir Richard Shuttle-worth, chief justice of Chester and a Sherborn connexion by marriage, was supervisor of the will. A memorial in the church at Mitton lists several of Sherborn?s chief offices, but does not mention his having sat in Parliament. He had begun the rebuilding of his home before his death and the work was completed by his son Richard. The house passed into the ownership of the English College from Liege in 1794 and is now a Catholic public school.8

Ref Volumes: 1509-1558 Author: Alan Davidson Notes 1. Date of birth estimated from first reference, but said to be ten at fa.?s death. Vis. Lancs. (Chetham Soc. lxxxi), 58; (lxxxviii), 264; C. D. Sherborn, Sherborn Fam. 27 seq.; Chetham Soc. lx. 267; VCH Lancs. vii. 5. 2. VCH Lancs. ii. 97-98; vii. 5; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 280-1; 1572-5, p. 92; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 24; APC, xii. 8; xviii. 386; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; HMC Foljambe, 25; DKR, xliii. 274; Somerville, Duchy, i. 467n, 491, 501; CSP Dom. 1591-4, p. 402. 3. LP Hen. VIII, xiii, xix; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. xxxv. 171; DKR, xxxix. 559; CPR, 1554-5, p. 330; 1557-8, p. 174. 4. PCC 38 Daper; Liverpool Town Bks. ed. Twemlow, i. 52a. 5. Twemlow, i. 165, 169, 313; ii. 831, 838; APC, vii. 107; xi. 49; Chetham Soc. n.s. xix. 76; lxxii. 30; Lancs. and Cheshire Hist. Soc. xcii. 51, 53. 6. J. B. Watson, ?Lancs. gentry 1529-58? (London Univ. M.A. thesis, 1959), 478; APC, xi. 89, 163, 191; CPR, 1560-3, pp. 538, 581; Chetham Soc. n.s. lxxii. 2, 12, 27. 7. VCH Lancs. vii. 5, 131; Cam. Misc. ix(3), 77; CSP Dom. 1591-4, pp. 159-60, a document tentatively dated 1591 but see H. H. Leonard, ?Knights and knighthood in Tudor Engl.? (London Univ. Ph.D. thesis, 1970), 256n; Cath. Rec. Soc. iv. 178-9; J. Croston, Samlesbury, 104-5; J. S. Leatherbarrow, Lancs. Eliz. Recusants (Chetham Soc. n.s. cx), 27, 32, 99; Harl. 1926, f. 80; APC, xxiv. 281, 334, 410; Lancs. and Cheshire Rec. Soc. lxxxviii. 45. 8. Chetham Soc. lx. 267; T. D. Whitaker, Whalley (3rd ed.), 467; Ducatus Lanc. i. 161; Pevsner, N. Lancs. 239-40.

Sir Richard Sherbourne, a knight and deputy lieutenant of Queen Elizabeth I.

 
SHERBURN, Richard (I7043)
 
66
About Thorold, Sheriff of Lincoln

CURATOR'S NOTES: The question of Thorold's position in a Mercian family and his relation to the Malet family has been much discussed, with varying theories, over the years. Based upon the work of Katherine Keats-Rohan, it is generally believed today that he was married to a daughter of William (Guillaume I) de Malet and was the father of Lucy "of Bolingbroke", later Countess of Chester, who was his heir. It is also postulated that he himself may have been the product of a marriage between a Mercian father and a Malet wife. He was likely the nephew of Godgifu, Lady Godiva of Coventry. He died not long before the Domesday Book (1086).

I put the foremost trust in Keats-Rohan's interpretations. Please see her essay, below.

Charles Cawley, author of the Medieval Lands Database, positions Lucy's parentage slightly differently, believing that Thorold was her uncle rather than her father. His research data reads:

http://fmg.ac/Projects/MedLands/ENGLISHNOBILITYMEDIEVAL3L-O.htm#GodgifuMLeofricMercia

Relatives of the Malet family, the exact connections have not yet been established:

1. [--- . According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol?qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[901]. The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained. m [--- de Lincoln, son of ---].]

2. [--- . m ---.] [Three] children:

a) THOROLD de Bukenhale (-after [1076/79]). Sheriff of Lincolnshire. The Annals of Peterborough record that ?Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivę comitissę Leycestrię? founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[902]. ?Thoroldus de Bukenhale?vicecomiti? donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names ?domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestrię et?comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea?et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hęredis eorum?[903]. Herman?s De miraculis sancti Eadmundi names ??Lincolniensis Turoldus?? among those present when Herfast Bishop of Thetford visited Baldwin Abbot of St Edmund?s to be cured of an injury to his eye, dated to [1076/79] by Round[904].

b) GODGIFU (-after [1054/57]). She is named as wife of Earl Leofric by Florence of Worcester, who specifies that she and her husband founded monasteries at Leominster, Wenlock, Chester and Stowe[905]. The Annals of Peterborough record that ?Thoroldus vicecomes et frater germanus Godivę comitissę Leycestrię? founded Spalding Monastery in 1052[906]. Her family origin is also indicated by the undated charter under which ?Thoroldus de Bukenhale?vicecomiti? donated Spalding monastery to Croyland abbey which names ?domino meo Leofrico comite Leicestrię et?comitissa sua domina Godiva sorore mea?et cognati mei comitis Algari primogeniti et hęredis eorum?[907]. The De Gestis Herwardi Saxonis names "Aediva trinepta Oslaci ducis" as wife of "Lefricus de Brunne, nepos comitis Radulfi cognominati Scalre", when recording that they were parents of "Herwardus"[908]. "Oslaci ducis" could be "Oslac" recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as "earl [of Northumbria]" in 966[909], but any precise relationship has not been identified. ?Leofricus comes?et conjux mea Godgyve? donated property to Evesham Monastery by undated charter which names ?frater meus Normannus?[910]. Godgifu wife of Leofric granted property to St Mary's, Stow by charter dated [1054/57][911]. Orderic Vitalis records that ?Elfgarus comes? had founded ?Coventrense c?nobium? and that ?Godiova...comitissa? donated ?omnem thesaurum suum? to the church[912]. She was the Lady Godiva of legend. m LEOFRIC Earl of Mercia, son of LEOFWINE Ealdorman of the Hwicce in Mercia (-Bromley 30 Oct 1057, bur Coventry).

c) [daughter . The source quoted below which names Thorold as "avunculus" of Lucy suggests that he was her maternal uncle, assuming that the word was used in its strict sense (which cannot be beyond doubt). m ---. It is unlikely that the sources quoted below, which name Lucy as daughter of "Algari comitis Leicestrię", are reliable. It is assumed that they all refer to Ęlfgar Earl of Mercia (see ANGLO-SAXON NOBILITY), which would mean that Lucy was the sister of Earls Edwin and Morcar. However, such a relationship appears chronologically impossible, even if Lucy was born very late in the life of Earl Ęlfgar (whose death is dated to 1062), considering that she apparently had four children by her third husband who she married in 1098.] One child:

i) LUCY (-1138, bur Spalding). According to a charter of Henri Duke of Normandy (later Henry II King of England) issued in favour of her son Ranulf Earl of Chester dated 1153, Ctss Lucy was the niece of Robert [I] Malet of Eye and of Alan of Lincoln: "H. dux Norm. et comes And." granted land to "Ranulfo comiti Cestrie", including "totum honorem de Eia sicut Robertus Malet avunculus matris sue" had held and "foeudum Alani de Lincol?qui fuit avunculus matris sue", by charter dated to [Jan/Apr] 1153[913]. The precise relationships between all these individuals has not yet been ascertained. Domesday Descendants suggests that Thorold was her father[914]. Keats-Rohan expands her arguments in another article, based primarily on the presence of both Thorold and his wife as "antecessores" of Lucy and her first husband in the charter under which the couple donated Spalding monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas, Anjou (see below)[915]. The Complete Peerage also discusses whether Thorold could have been Lucy?s father and that her mother could have been the daughter of Guillaume [I] Malet[916]. An alternative origin is suggested by Ingulph's potentially spurious Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland, which records that William I King of England arranged the marriage of "Ivo Taillebois" and "Lucia sister of Edwin and Morcar", her dowry consisting of their land at Hoyland[917]. The Genealogia Fundatoris of Coventry Monastery also names ?Luciam postea comitissam? as daughter of ?Algarus tertius?, adding that she married firstly ?Yvoni Taylboys? by whom she was childless, secondly ?Rogero filio Geroldi Romara?, thirdly ?Ranulfo comiti Cestrię?, and was buried ?apud Spalding?[918]. The Chronicon Anglię Petriburgense records "Lucię comitissę?filię Algari comitis Leicestrię" as husband of "Ivo Tailbois comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldingię et totius Hollandię" and "Toraldus avunculus eiusdem Lucię"[919]. Lastly, the Annals of Peterborough name ?Yvo Taylboys, comes Andegavensis, dominus Spaldynge et totius Holandię?maritus Lucię, filię Algari comitis Leicestrię? and "Toraldus avunculus?Lucię" when recording his donation to Spalding Monastery in 1074[920]. This relationship with Earls Edwin and Morcar is impossible from a chronological point of view, in particular because Lucy gave birth to children by her third husband at a time when she would have been over fifty if she has been their sister. It is also extremely unlikely that their sister would have been given a name derived from the Romance languages. ?Ivo Taleboys? donated Spalding Monastery to the church of Saint-Nicholas Anjou, for ?conjugis suę Lucię et antecessorum Toraldi, scilicet uxoris eius, requie? by undated charter[921]. Peter of Blois's Continuation of the Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records the death of Ivo and his burial at the priory of Spalding, and the remarriage of his widow "hardly had one month elapsed after his death" with "Roger de Romar the son Gerald de Romar"[922]. A manuscript recording the foundation of Spalding monastery records that ?Yvo Talboys? married "Thoroldo?hęrede Lucia" who, after the death of Ivo, married (in turn) "Rogerum filium Geroldi" and "comitem Cestrię Ranulphum"[923]. Ingulph's Chronicle of the Abbey of Croyland records that "his wife the lady Lucia" married "Roger de Romar the son of Gerald de Romar" when "hardly had one month elapsed after the death" of her first husband "Ivo Taillebois"[924]. She is named as wife of Ranulf by Orderic Vitalis, who also names her first husband, but does not state her origin[925]. ?Ranulfus Meschinus Richerio Vicecomiti Karlioli? donated property for the foundation of Wetherhal priory, Cumberland, for the souls of ??mea et uxoris meę Lucię??, by undated charter[926]. The 1130 Pipe Roll records "Lucia comitissa Cestr?tra patis sui" in Lincolnshire[927]. ?Lucia cometissa? donated ?manerium de Spallingis...cum quibus melius tenui et liberalius tempore Ivonis de Thallebos et Rogeri filii Geroldi et cometis Rannulfi? by charter dated to [1135][928]. m firstly as his second wife, IVO Taillebois Lord of Kendal, son of --- (-after 1094, bur Spalding). ?Ivo Talliebois? donated property to St Mary, York, for the soul of ?uxoris meę Lucię?, by undated charter witnessed by ?Lucia uxore mea, Ribaldo genero meo, Radulpho Taillebois??[929]. m secondly (after 1094) ROGER FitzGerold, son of GEROLD "Miles Christi" Chātelain de Neufmarché & his wife Aubreye (-[1096/98]). m thirdly (1098) RANULF "Meschin" Vicomte du Bessin, son of RANULF Vicomte du Bessin [Bayeux] & his wife Marguerite [Maud] d'Avranches (-17 or 27 Jan 1129, bur Chester, Abbey of St Werburgh). He was appointed Vicomte d'Avranches in 1120 and Earl of Chester.

-=
= http://users.ox.ac.uk/~prosop/prosopon/issue2-2.pdf

Prosopon Newsletter, 2 (May 1995)

"A lot of ink has flowed on the subject, but there can be no doubt that the ?mysterious? Countess Lucy of Chester was William Malet?s thrice-married granddaughter, the daughter of Robert Malet?s sister and Turold the Sheriff of Lincoln (dead by 1079).1 The suggestion was first made by R. Kirk in 1888.2 As N. Sumner has more recently observed: ?This account has the merit of explaining why the lordship of Spalding and other places in Lincolnshire were held after Ivo?s death not by Beatrice, his direct heir and the daughter of his marriage to Lucy,3 but by the later husbands of Lucy, Roger fitz Gerold and Ranulph Meschines.?4 It is clear from her charters that Lucy was an heiress; as was to be expected, her estates passed to the sons of her second and third marriages. Kirk?s work was based upon conjecture, and contained a number of errors. The question of Lucy?s parentage has therefore remained open. Nevertheless, there is proof that Kirk was right.....

A spurious charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (the Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva?s son Earl Algar as Turold?s cognatus (cousin).5 A genealogia fundatoris of Coventry Abbey made Lucy a daughter of Earl Algar and sister and heiress of earls Edwin and Morcar.6 The Peterborough Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf?s Chronicle of Crowland both made Lucy the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold.7 We know that William Malet was half-English, so these traditions probably boil down to a relationship between Countess Godiva and William?s English mother.

In 1153 a charter [RRAN iii, 180] of the future Henry II for Lucy?s son Ranulf II of Chester referred to her uncles Robert Malet and Alan of Lincoln. Alan of Lincoln was the successor, and almost certainly the son, of Domesday?s Alfred of Lincoln. Chronologically, it is most unlikely that Alan was Lucy?s uncle. It was probably another of Alfred?s sons whom Domesday described as Alfred nepos [nephew or grandson] of Turold, then holding a fee which was certainly thereafter held with the rest of the senior Alfred?s fee by his heir Alan. Domesday provides a further indication that Alfred senior married another of William Malet?s daughters when it names a William as Alfred?s predecessor in two of his manors.8 Other parts of each of these manors (Linwood and Rothwell) were held in 1086 by Durand Malet, who was probably William?s son. It seems that Henry?s charter can be explained by seeing a scribe, perhaps in search of rhetorical balance, commit the error of ascribing two uncles to Lucy, instead of a niece (Lucy) and a nephew (Alan of Lincoln) to Robert Malet, who was uncle to both.

Turold is evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknall.9 The abbey also held land at Spalding that had probably been granted to it by Earl Algar and there is evidence to suggest that Turold the Sheriff gave further land there to the abbey of St Nicholas, Angers, before 1079.10 Lucy and her first husband Ivo Taillebois subsequently founded, or perhaps re-founded, a priory at Spalding subject to St. Nicholas, Angers. A revealing phrase from the Register of Spalding Priory reads: ?mortuo quia dicto Thoraldo relicta sibi herede Lucia predicta? [at his death Turold left an heir, the aforesaid Lucy].11 The word heres, ?heir?, was often used of the child who was to inherit his/her father?s property. Lucy later confirmed the gifts of all three of her husbands: ?pro redempcione anime patris mei et matris mee et dominorum meorum et parentum meorum? [for the souls of my father and mother, my husbands and my (other) relatives].12 The association of the priory with such a small group of people and the description of Lucy as heres of Turold strongly hint at Lucy?s parentage. But we can go further still.

In their initial benefaction Ivo and Lucy referred to ?antecessorum suorum13 Turoldi scilicet uxorisque eius regine? [our ?ancestors? Turold and his wife].14 The reference to Turold?s wife indicates that some part of his landholding had come to him through his wife, something also indicated by the occurrence of William Malet amongst those who had held the Domesday lands of Lucy?s first husband Ivo Taillebois before him.15 The apparently vague Latin words antecessor and predecessor can both be used to mean something like ?predecessor?. Each of them conveys a range of very precise meanings in different circumstances. The description of Turold and his wife as antecessores of Ivo and Lucy may be compared to the usage in a charter in the cartulary of Mont-Saint-Michel by which the Angevins Hugh Chalibot and his wife confirmed the grants of her father, who was described as antecessor noster.16 Other examples of this phrase show clearly that it was used by a married man to describe the parent from whom his wife had inherited the property she brought to the marriage. Acting on her own account (normally after her husband?s death), the heiress will often describe herself as the daughter of the parent her husband described as antecessor noster. A rare use of the phrase was to indicate the couple?s immediate predecessor, not her father but her brother.17 In Lucy and Ivo?s case the plurality of their antecessores, Turold and his wife, puts the matter beyond doubt. Lucy?s parents were indeed Turold the Sheriff and a daughter of William Malet.

NOTES

1 See Round, Feudal England, pp. 255-6; Complete Peerage, ed. G.E.C., 13 vols., (1910-59) vol. vii, App. J, 743-6.

2 R.E.G. Kirk, ?The Countess Lucy: Singular or Plural??, Genealogist, n.s. 5, 60-75, 131-44, 153-73.

3 Beatrice (who bore the name of Robert Malet?s sister) married Ribald, half-brother of Count Alan; Monasticon Anglicanum, ed. W.Dugdale, new edition, 6 vols. (1817-30), iii, 553, no. xx. For their descendants see Rev.H.C. Fitz Herbert, ?An original pedigree of Tailbois and Neville?, The Genealogist, n.s. iii, 31. Clay thought Beatrice was probably illegitimate (see Early Yorkshire Charters, v. p.291).

4 N. Sumner, ?The Countess Lucy?s Priory? The Early History of Spalding Priory and its Estates?, Reading Medieval Studies 13 (1988), 81-103, here, 84.

5 Monasticon Anglicanum ii, 118-19.

6 Ibid., ii, 192.

7 See Complete Peerage, vii, App. J, 743-6, here 745 and note.

8 Domesday Book, fol. 357d.

9 Domesday Book, fol. 346d.

10 Domesday Book, fol. 346d; see N. Sumner, ?The Countess Lucy?s priory??, 83-4 and n.12.

11 B.M. Add. 35296, fol. 2r.

12 B.M. Add. 35296, fol. 9r.

13 suorum, ?their? in the Register would have been nostrorum, ?our?, in the original charter.

14 B.N. Coll. Anjou-Touraine 3, no. 876 (Saint-Nicholas d?Angers), and B.M. Add. 35296 (Spalding), though both later copies, agree upon this wording.

15 Monasticon Anglicanum, ii, p.220, nos. v and viii.

16 Bibliothčque de la Ville d?Avranches, ms 210, fol. 104r-v. I am preparing an edition of this cartulary.

17 Red Book of the Exchequer, ed. H. Hall, 3 vols (Rolls Series, 1896), i, 368.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln1 d. before 1079

Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln was related to Lucy "the Countess" of Lincoln; per the Peterborough Chronicle and the Pseudo-Ingulf's Chronicle of Crowland, the daughter of Algar and niece or great-niece of Turold.1 Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln was evidenced in Domesday Book as a benefactor of Crowland Abbey, to which he gave a parcel of land at Bucknell.1 He was cognatus, or cousin, of Earl Algar of Mercia, son of Lady Godiva.2 He married N. N. Malet, daughter of Willelm Malet, seigneur de Graville and Elise Crespin.1 Turold of Bucknell, Sheriff of Lincoln gave further land in Bucknell to the abbey of St Nicholas before 1079 at Angers.1 He died before 1079.1

Family N. N. Malet Child

* Lucy "the Countess" of Lincoln+ b. c 10661,3

Citations

1. [S936] K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Parentage of Countess Lucy". 2. [S936] K. S. B. Keats-Rohan, "Parentage of Countess Lucy", A spurious charter of Crowland Abbey made Turold of Bucknall (the Sheriff) the founder of the priory of Spalding as a cell of Crowland. It also called Turold brother of Godiva countess of Mercia, but subsequently described Godiva's son Earl Algar as Turold's cognatus (cousin).. 3. [S1032] K.S.B. Keats-Rohan, Domesday People, Iuo Tillebois, pg. 283.

Turold Sheriff of Lincolnshire 1, 2, 3, 4 was born 1020 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. He died Dec 1085 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England. Turold married N.N. MALET on 1068 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.

N.N. MALET [Parents] 1, 2, 3 was born 1046 in Graville-Sainte-Honorine, Seine-Maritime, France. She married Turold Sheriff of Lincolnshire on 1068 in Spalding, Lincolnshire, England.

They had the following children:

F i Lucy Countess of Chester was born 1069 and died 1138.

Sources:

1Keats-Rohan, K. S. B., "Antecessor Noster: The Parentage of Countess Lucy Made Plain," Prosopon, No. 2 (May 1995), p. 1, Linacre College.

2Weis, Frederick Lewis, Ancestral Roots of Certain American Colonists Who Came to America before 1700 (7th ed., Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1992.), 176A-2, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 974 W426 1992.

3Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People: A Prosopography of Persons Occurring in English Documents, 1066-1166 (Woodbridge: The Boydell Press, 1999.), p. 283, Los Angeles Public Library, Gen 942.02 K25.

4Keats-Rohan, K.S.B., Domesday People, pp. 1137-8.

Notes and Queries, Oxford Journals.[NEED MORE SPECIFIC SOURCE] from http://adupree.com/wp/g/getperson.php?personID=I6351&tree=adupree

There is other presumptive evidence of the connexion of William Malet with England previous to the eventful expedition. He had Blood cosponsor with Harold himself, and therefore, as being likely to recognize the body of the king after the fataal battle, was entrusted by the conqueror with the painful duty of finding and giving it burial. He who undertook this office is described in Bishop Guy's poem as "quidam partim Normannus et Anglus." William Malet was therefore nn Anglo-Norman of mixed blood. It was doubtless his mother who was English; and I would suggest that it may have been she who was the sister (rather daughter) of Earl Leofric, through whom the Norman Earls of Chester subsequently claimed descent from the Anglo-o-Saxon Earls, though the connexion was clearly misstated. It was alleged in pleadings in the reign of Richard II. that her name was Eormenhild, which is not an unlikely one, being that of the mother of St. Werburgh, whose abbey at Chester was iin the patronage of Earl Leofric, and after of the Norman counts palatine (Mon. Angl. i. 305). Burton, in his Description of Leicestershire, 1622 (p. 168), made Earl Algar marry William Malet's sister. This was adopted by Ormerod {Hist. Cheshire, i. 47), though daughter would have been better. Ivo Tailbois gave Spalding to the monks of Angers for the souls of himself, of his wife Lucy, " and of the ancestors of Thorold the sheriff, that is to say (those) of hit wife" (Mon. Angl.,'\. 307). Lucy was, therefore,, descended collaterally from Thorold. Godgifu, the wife of Earl Leofric, was Thorold's sister, and in all probability Lucy's own ancestress ? greatgrandmother according to these suggestions, which I find dates will allow. It, however, does not follow, and Lucy might have had for her father Alured nepos Thoroldi, son, perhaps, of Wigot of Lincoln by another sister of Thorold, and for her mother a daughter of William Malet. A son of the Countess Godgifu might have been called "nephew (which nepos generally means in Domesday Book) of Thorold," as his adopted heir; but this is a suggestion merely, not supported by anything in the Survey or elsewhere. In Domesday Book (ii. fo. 304, 6) is the remarkable statatement concerning a manor in Hemingstone, in Suffolk, in the barony of Robert Malet, that "Leuric [t.«., Leofric], antecessor [t.«., predecessor] of the mother of Robert, held it" in the time of King Edward. We have not evidence to enable us to say whether there is not some misstatement here, or whether it is anything more than a coincidence, and Earl Leofric may not have been intended, but it is curious.

This excerpt suggests that Thorold is an ancestor not father of Lucy.
http://opendomesday.org/place/TF2422/spalding/

Place: Spalding
Hundred: Elloe
Area: Holland
County: Lincolnshire
Total population: 91 households (very large).
Total tax assessed: 12.4 geld units (very large).

Spalding appears in 3 entries in Domesday Book.

? ENTRY 1 ?
Head of manor: Spalding.
Taxable units: Taxable value 9 geld units. Payments of 2.5 miscellaneous.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £23.1. Value to lord in 1086 £30.
Households: 40 villagers. 33 smallholders.
Ploughland: 9 ploughlands (land for). 4 lord's plough teams. 13 men's plough teams.
Other resources: 6 fisheries. 2 salthouses.
Lord in 1066: Earl Algar.
Lord in 1086: Ivo Tallboys.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Ivo Tallboys.
Phillimore reference: 14,97

? ENTRY 2 ?

Head of manor: Crowland.
Taxable units: Taxable value 2 geld units.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £1. Value to lord in 1086 £1.
Households: 7 villagers. 4 smallholders.
Ploughland: 1.5 ploughland (land for). 3 men's plough teams.
Lord in 1066: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Lord in 1086: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Crowland (St Guthlac), abbey of.
Phillimore reference: 11,2

? ENTRY 3 ?

Taxable units: Taxable value 1.4 geld units. Payments of 0.01 salt-houses.
Value: Value to lord in 1066 £2. Value to lord in 1086 £2.
Households: 5 villagers. 2 smallholders.
Ploughland: 1 lord's plough teams. 1 men's plough teams.
Other resources: 2 salthouses.
Lord in 1066: Aethelstan (son of Godram).
Lord in 1086: Guy of Craon.
Tenant-in-chief in 1086: Guy of Craon.
Phillimore reference: 57,54 
THOROLD Sheriff of Lincoln (I11006)
 
67
Alice Kighley Newsom
Birth 1500
Inskip with Sowerby, Wyre Borough, Lancashire, England
Death 1523 (aged 22?23)
City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Burial
Saint Anne's Church
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Memorial ID 183940681 · View Source

ALICE KIGHLEY NEWSOM was born at Inkskip, Lancashire, England the daughter of SIR HENRY and MARGARET HESKETH KIGHLEY. She married in 1520 at Newsham Hall, GEORGE NEWSOM the son of JOHN and SICILE SINGLETON NEWSOM. She died in 1523 at Newsham Hall at the age of 23.

Known Children:
JOHN NEWSOM 1520-1552 Md GRACE PRESTON Died Newsham Hall, Lancashire, England

RICHARD NEWSOM

ELIZABETH NEWSOM 
KIGHLEY, Alice (I1614)
 
68
Catherine Elston Newsom
Birth 1538
Lancashire, England
Death 1553 (aged 14?15)
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Burial
Saint Anne's Church
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Memorial ID 183895695 · View Source

Catherine Elston Newsom was born in 1538 in Lancashire, England the daughter of Rafe Elston. She married in 1552 in Lancashire, George Newsom the son of John and Grace Preston Newsom.

Children:
Grace Newsom 
ELSTON, Catherine (I1647)
 
69
Dorothy Boteler Booth
Birth unknown
Death 1553
Burial
St Mary the Virgin Churchyard
Eccles, Metropolitan Borough of Salford, Greater Manchester, England
Memorial ID 150289696 · View Source

Daughter of Sir Thomas Boteler of Bewsey (in Warrington) by his wife Margaret Delves, daughter of Sir John Delves and his wife Ellen Egerton.

Dorothy died testate with a will dated August 7, 1553, with the request 'I will yt my bodie shalbe buried in ye p'ishe church of Eccles w'thin or as neare unto ye grave or place where the bodie of my son John Bothe latly deceassed lieth buried as coveyenly may be...' 
BOTELER, Dorothy (I11584)
 
70
Ellen Lucille Singleton Newsom
Birth 1588
Goosnargh, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Death 1617 (aged 28?29)
Bispham, Blackpool Unitary Authority, Lancashire, England
Burial
All Hallow's Churchyard
Bispham, Blackpool Unitary Authority, Lancashire, England
Memorial ID 183900525 · View Source

ELLEN LUCILE SINGLETON NEWSOM was born in 1588 at Singleton Hall, Goosenargh, Lancashire, England the daughter of SIR ROBERT and ANNE SOUTHWORTH SINGLETON,IV. She married on 3 March 1604/05 at Singleton Hall, Goosenargh, Lancashire, WILLIAM NEWSOM the son of ROBERT AND ELIZABETH SHIREBURN NEWSOM.

Known Children:
Robert Newsom 1610-
Richard Newsom 1612-
WILLIAN NEWSOM 1614-1657 Md ELIZABETH GERTRUDE WILSON Died Rich Neck Plantation, Virginia Colony. 
SINGLETON, Ellen Lucille (I7046)
 
71
George Newsom
Birth 1502
City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Death 1567 (aged 64?65)
City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Burial
Saint Anne's Church
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Memorial ID 183940423 · View Source

GEORGE NEWSOM was born 1503 in Newsham Hall, Lancashire, England the son of JOHN and SICILE SINGLETON. He married in 1520 at Newsham Hall, in Lancashire, ALICE KIGHLEY the daughter of SIR HENRY and MARGARET HESKETH KIGHLEY.
He died at Newsham Hall in 1567 at the age of 65.

Known Children:
JOHN NEWSOM 1520-1552 Md GRACE PRESTON Died Newsham Hall, Lancashire, England

RICHARD NEWSOM

ELIZABETH NEWSOM 
NEWSOM, George (I1613)
 
72
Henry de Lacy ? the son of Robert (1) and brother of Ilbert (2)

Henry de Lacy (1) was probably the third son of Robert de Lacy (1). He inherited the de Lacy lands after his brother Ilbert died without an heir.

It seems that Henry de Lacy continued to support King Stephen but he received pardons when Henry II (the son of Matilda) came to the throne. One of these pardons was witnessed by the Empress Matilda and it restored his father?s lands to him and pardoned him for anything he had done before he paid homage to Henry II.

Henry built a timber castle at Selby around 1143 probably to protect not only his own estates on their weakest side but the town and abbey of Selby as well. The abbot at the time, Elias Paynel, was a relative of the de Lacy family and the de Lacy estates came with two miles of Selby. Selby castle was besieged within a week of its commencement by an Earl William who was at war with Henry. He may have been William of Roumare (earl of Lincoln) or William of Aumale (earl of York) or William earl of Warenne (holder of Conisbrough, Wakefield and Dewsbury). All three were neighbours to Henry de Lacy and whichever one it was may have been fighting in league with Guy de Laval who had a claim on the honour of Pontefract because the lands had previously been given to his family during the exile of the de Lacy family. The town of Selby was sacked and burned and even though the castle held out for a few days longer it was surrendered. Henry also built castles at Almondbury and Barwick with permission from King Stephen, creating a good ring of protection around the honour which was necessary as he was also troubled by a private war with Gilbert de Gaunt (who became earl of Lincoln and was the brother of Ilbert?s wife Alice).

When Henry de Lacy fell ill he vowed that if he recovered he would found a religious house. When he was well again he gave land at Barnoldswick to the mother house of the Cistercian order at Fountains Abbey for them to establish a daughter house there, but the site proved unsuitable and on 19th May 1152 the monks moved to a new site at Kirkstall. The land belonged to William Peitevin, who held it of Henry de Lacy, but it is Henry who is recorded in the foundation history as being the driving force behind William?s grant of this land to the monks.
Kirkstall Abbey

Henry de Lacy went on crusade to the Holy Land on two separate occasions. The first time was around 1158. He was exempted from taxation that year, but was back in England for the dedication of the new church at Pontefract priory in 1159. In 1165 he was with the king on his Welsh expedition and took along a large retinue. He was also with the king in Normandy in 1173.

At Easter 1177 he left for Jerusalem for a second time in the company of the earl of Essex and the count of Flanders and at this time he also witnessed the award made by Henry II between Alphonso, king of Castile, and Sancho, king of Navarre.

Henry de Lacy died on crusade on 25th September 1177, but how and where is not known. Whether his remains were brought back for burial at Kirkstall abbey is unclear.

Henry was married to the sister of William de Vesci, lord of Alnwick. They had one known son named Robert de Lacy (2) who inherited the lands. 
DE LACY, Henry (I10840)
 
73
https://www.ancestry.com/genealogy/records/joseph-white_16944247

Born in Ireland, Pennsylvania, USA on 1709 to Moses White and Eleanor Lawson. Joseph married Margaret Leeth and had 13 children. Joseph married Averilla Harper. He passed away on Apr 1808 in Anson, Union, North Carolina, USA.

Children
David White 1738-1809
Joseph White 1745-1804
John White 1738-Unknown
James White 1739-Unknown
Mary White 1737-1757
George White 1741-1830
William White 1753-1829
Zachariah White 1755-1794
Josiah White 1752-1804
Robert White 1745-1786
Elizabeth White 1750-1848
Mary White 1755-Unknown
Lydia White 1750-1838
 
WHITE, Joseph (I11291)
 
74
MACKIE, William Syme (1845-1896)
British (Scottish) journalist and newspaper editor.

LIFE
Born 1845 in Dunfermline, son of John Mackie and Janet Syme. Brother of Robert Syme Mackie (q.v.) and John Beveridge Mackie (q.v.). Was married and John Beveridge Mackie, jun. (q.v.) was his son. A member of the Manchester Press Club and its second President. Joined the Institute of Journalists in 1887. Died 6 Nov. 1896. Address at 1893-at 1896: New Park Villa, Shelton, Stoke-on-Trent. At death: 29 Caledonian Road, Leeds.

CAREER
Dunfermline Press
Scotsman, rep. c.1866
Manchester Examiner & Times, chief rep. c.1870-
City Lantern (Manchester), cont. c.1875
City Jackdaw (Manchester), cont. c.1880
Edinburgh Daily Review, Ed. 1877-?
Manchester Examiner, Parl. & Ldn. corr. at 1881-1888
Staffordshire Sentinel, Ed. 1888-at 1896
North Staffordshire Herald, fndr. & Ed. c.1890's
Leeds Mercury, rep.: Ed. 5 Oct.-Nov. 1896
Source:https://www.scoop-database.com/bio/mackie_william_syme_1

LETTER FROM WILLIAM SYME MACKIE TO WILLIAM WOODALL
From a 19th century collection made by William Woodall, the radical Liberal M.P. for Stoke-on-Trent and Hanley and a trustee of the Wedgewood Institute.

5 October 1896
"I am leaving here today to take up new duties at Leeds on Monday. When I came to Hanley 8 years ago I never dreamt it possible that I should leave it with such a keen regret as I feel today. The appointment conferred upon me at the Leeds Mercury is from my point of view an ideal one and the principle offices in it are filled by warm personal friends of old standing. In that, except for my own deficiencies I have no [lessening of the sense of pleasure in my work. But it's hard to part with friends, who have shown me invariable kindness, foremost among whom I must reckon yourself. Not the least of the pleasures you have conferred on me is the great happiness of a close intimacy with our mutual friend, Mr Solon who, in the spirit of a brother, has brought me much help (unconsciously on his part & out of sheer good nature) on some very lonesome Saturday evenings of late when I have been weary and depressed. I am sorry to go without having a moment to run over to Bleak House to see you. I am uneasy about the future of the Liberal Party (or as far as journalism is concerned) in North Staffordshire and I could have wished not only for my own sake that something could have been done to maintain the Herald as a watchdog on our neighbours. I am trying all I can to sell and hope it may fall into good hands. With kind regards and good wishes, particularly under the affliction you suffer, I am my dear friend, yours" etc.


NEWS ARTICLE APPEARING IN THE JOURNALIST AND NEWSPAPER PROPRIETOR
Contains an account of the journalistic career of William Syme Mackie leading up to his appointment as editor of the Leeds Mercury.

William Syme Mackie began his career at the Scotsman under Alexander Russell before spending time as a reporter on the Manchester Examiner. He was a keen reporter on parliamentary affairs but an accident suffered at a cricket match (when a ball hit him in the eye) led him to give up the reporter's gallery of the House of Commons for what was, by comparison, a quite backwater on the Staffordshire Sentinel and the North Staffordshire Herald (which he founded). His deft reporting style, however, continued to be in evidence and he was rewarded by appointment to the editorship of the powerful and influential Leeds Mercury, one of the foremost newspapers of the day. His reference to Mr Solon in his letter to Woodall refers to Marc-Louis Solon, the French artist and porcelain designer, who had worked for Sevres before coming to England in 1870, where he worked for Mintons in Stoke-on-Trent.


THE SUDDEN DEATH OF AN EDITOR.
LEEDS MERCURY
7 November, 1896
A painful sensation was caused in journalistic circles yesterday by the death, so sudden as to be almost tragic, of Mr W. S. Mackie, editor of the ?Leeds Mercury?. Mr Mackie, who was only 52 years of age, had only been recently appointed to that responsible position, entering actively upon the duties with the hearty good wishes of all who knew him, at the beginning of last month. Pending the settlement of his family in Leeds, Mr Mackie had taken apartments at 29, Caledonian-road.
As he felt somewhat indisposed on Friday he remain indoors on the two following days, but resumed his occupation on Monday. He quitted the ?Mercury? office, apparently in good health, at 3 o?clock yesterday morning, and leaving his bedroom shortly before 10 o?clock, he mentioned that he was again ill, and agreed to a suggestion that the doctor should be sent for. He retired to his room, and in a few minutes Mrs worth, at whose house he was staying, found him in the lounge chair with his head thrown back, and in a dying condition. Mr Cameron, a colleague who resides in the neighbourhood, with sent for, but on his arrival Mr Mackie was quite unconscious. Death ensued almost immediately after the attack, and was obviously due to failure of the heart s action. Under the circumstances an inquest was necessary, and this was held in the afternoon by the City Coroner (Mr J. C. Malcolm). The principal witness was Mrs Worth, the landlady, who informed the jury that the deceased had lodged with her for five weeks. He was in good health till Friday morning last, when he complained of palpitation and pains in the back. He stayed at home on Saturday and Sunday, and then, feeling better, he resumed his duties of the office on Monday. Yesterday morning he rose fairly early, and witnesses noticed that he was not looking well. She asked him if he had been ill again. He said ?Yes,? and she asked him if he had better not have a doctor. He said ?Yes.? He went out and took a seidlitz powder. When he returned he retired to his room, and witness heard a gurgling noise. Rushing into his room she found him in a lounge chair, with his head thrown back. She loosened his collar, but he died soon afterwards. The Coroner: Did he die in the chair?-Witness: in my arms. - Witness added that she concluded he had been seized with a fit. ? The Coroner said that the deceased had apparently been taken with a fit, and the jury found the death was due to natural causes. -
Mr Mackie?s predecessor in the editorship of the ?Mercury? was Mr Herbert Baines, who died from fever off the West Coast of Africa a very short time ago, the seizure being equally sudden. Though new to Leeds, Mr Mackie had gained the esteem of those about him, and was rapidly making friends on every hand. His connection with the Press was lifelong. He commenced as a reporter on the staff of the ?Scotsman,? under the skilful guidance of the late Mr Alexander Russel, and showed remarkable aptitude for journalistic work. About 27 years ago he joined the staff of the ?Manchester Examiner? when that newspaper was in the height of its popularity, and his abilities soon gained for him the appointment of chief reporter, which he held for a number of years, doing excellent work. Then he joined his two brothers in the purchase of the ?Edinburg Review,? and under their direction the newspaper was greatly improved, though it eventually succumbed to the keen competition of old-established journals. It?s failure brought no discredit upon the three brothers, and such experienced and able journalists had no difficulty in finding employment elsewhere. Mr William went to the Parliamentary Gallery, and as London correspondent of the ?Manchester Examiner? gave further evidence of his powers. Whilst there he met with an accident which brought about another change. One day whilst watching the Gallery Cricket Club at play the ball struck him in the eye, with the result that the sight was rather seriously impaired. Mr Mackie thereupon wisely sought a less arduous field of labour than the ?Gallery,? and he obtained the editorship of the ?Staffordshire Sentinel.? At Hanley he did splendid work, as indeed he had done elsewhere, and as it was anticipated he would do in Leeds. Alas! expectation has been disappointed. In the brief space of five weeks he has been able to do little more than indicate through the columns on the ?Mercury? what were his qualities as a journalist. But in the office, and especially amongst those of his colleagues who have long known his worth, his editorship was regarded with the utmost confidence, and, outside his own family, none will deplore his too early death more than those who had the satisfaction of working side-by-side with him during his brief period. It need not be said that to his brothers - the one is editor of the ?North-Eastern Daily Gazette,? at Middlesbrough, and the other of the ?Northern Daily Telegraph,? at Blackburn - and to his son and three daughters, who were shortly to have moved from Hanley, as well as to the other members of the family, the news of Mr Mackie?s sudden death was a terrible blow. To his colleagues, who little thought that only six months after that the no less tragic death of Mr Herbert S. Baines, they were once more to lose their chief, the event came with painful surprise. The regret will be shared in many other newspaper offices in the country, for Mr Mackie was widely known and esteemed. His remains are to be laid beside those of his wife, who died about four years ago, at Dunfermline, his native place.
The ?Leeds Mercury? of to-day, commenting on the loss of its editor, says: ?We feel that we shall not ask in vain for the sympathy of our readers under the very sudden and distressing bereavement that has again within the brief period of six months befallen the proprietors and the staff of this journal. By the death of Mr William Syme Mackie, which occurred yesterday morning with terrible sadness, the editorial chair in this office is once more vacant. Only six months ago it was our very sad duty to record the sudden death in the flower on his manhood of Mr Herbert Baines, then editor of the ?Mercury.? Five weeks ago Mr Herbert Baines was succeeded by Mr Mackie, who has since discharged the arduous duties of his position with the zeal of a journalist his whole heart was in his word, and with an nurturing energy that was characteristic of the man. Mr Mackie had shown here as elsewhere that he was an indefatigable worker, and when he left his post yesterday morning, after seeing the earlier editions of the paper to press, he gave no sign of physical weakness or depression. He parted from his colleagues with all his habitual cheerfulness and high spirits. But the paper with the latest contributions from his pen had not been long in the hands of its readers ere it?s editor of a few weeks had passed away. During a connection with the newspaper Press extending over more than 30 years, Mr Mackie had made a host of friends both among public men and among his colleagues and associates in journalism, and sincere and deep will be the regret with which they will learn the news of his unusual death. Few journalists have had a more brilliant and more honourable career. Mr Mackie had the pen of a ready and a gifted writer, together with the capacity for and love of work that were the admiration of all who knew him intimately. His connection with the ?Scotsman? in the days of Alexander Russel his subsequent career on the ?Manchester Examiner? under the late Alexander Ireland and of the late Dr. Dunckley, and his editorship of the ?Edinburg Daily Review,? gave him an almost unequalled experience of public men and public affairs. He was overflowing with reminiscences of that most varied experience, and his friends both of the Press and outside the ranks of journalism will reflect with mingled pleasure and sadness over the genial, entertaining, and loyal-hearted friend they have lost so suddenly. To work, and work hard, was no effort to Mr Mackie. To have his pen in hand was a joy to him. Nothing daunted him in the way of duty. The task that had to be done he did seemingly without effort. He had the capacity of always rising to the occasion, and this capacity he would certainly have shown here if only he had been spared to continue the work on which he had entered with so much zeal and energy, and so much promise. Mr Mackie showed in a striking degree the qualities of thoroughness, straightforwardness, and sincerity in all he did. A man of deeply-rooted convictions, nothing would induce him to?
 
MACKIE, William Syme (I11343)
 
75
Will of Mary Dean, Jasper County, GA

Know all men by thye presents that
Mary Dean of the state of Georgia and
County of Jasper do for and in consideration of the
law and good will unto my sons Edmond and
Drury Dean do go and Bequeath and give all that tract
or parcil of land known by No one hundred and thirty
three in the seventeenth District having such share and
form and mark as appear by the plat. This is my will my son
Edmond Dean one half of said lot from the north line to
hold from the maple and the dogwood corner to the center of
the said land that my son Drury Dean shall have that half
of said to the south side of the two white oaks corners to have
and to hold each of them and their heirs and assigns forever and
the apportions may serve as a measure part of said lot
lying on the east line running from the maple to white
oak corner being and lying on the east side of the barn.
Be it understood said Lot of Land is not to be sold
without my consent or life time. Given under my hand
and seal this Second day of August 1814.
in presence of |
her
Wm McCord |
Mary Dean [seal]
William Diamond |
mark
John Lours |
Recorded 2 August 1814
---------
|
Henry Walker
Georgia, |
----------
Jasper County |

Personally appeared before me William Diamond and
of the subscribing witnesses to the within Deed
and being Duly sworn saith that he was present
and said within Deed signed acknowledged and
Demanded _____  
TAYLOR, Mary (I672075068)
 
76
William Newsom
Birth 1445
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Death 1536 (aged 90?91)
City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Burial
Saint Anne's Church
Woodplumpton, City of Preston, Lancashire, England
Memorial ID 183955060 · View Source

SIR WILLIAM NEWSOM was born 1445 at Newsham Hall, near Woodplumpton, Lancashire, England the son of SIR RICHARD AND BARBARA EDMUND NEWSON.
He married LADY JANE, maiden name and parents unknown.

Known Children:
JOHN NEWSOM 1467-1516 Md SICILE SINGLETON Died
Newsom Hall, Lancashire, England

ELIZABETH NEWSOM 1480-

 
NEWSOM, William (I7039)
 
77 Notes for JOSEPH MATTHEWS:
JOSEPH MATTHEWS was born about 1710-15, and married ELIZABETH, perhaps the daughter of JOHN STEVENSON and CATHERINE WIGGS.

On Oct. 15, 1753, he sold 150 acres on the South side of Three Creeks to John Brewer [Southampton County, VA Deed Book 2, p. 7].

He and his family were residing in Edgecombe Co., NC prior to July 13, 1764, when he conveyed two tracts of 275 acres and 691 acres on the North side of Swift Creek to Isaac Hilliard [Edgecombe Co., NC Deed Book C, pp. 296, 297].

He removed to old Cumberland County (now Harnett County) after 1771. His will was probated in Cumberland County in January, 1791.

 
MATTHEWS, Joseph (I41342)
 
78
Willis W Cherry [C1a8p], son of Lemuel Cherry and Gatsey Ann Llewellyn, was born about 1748 in Beaufort Co NC. He was under age when his father died in 1754, and was bound to William Willis before January 1765; William Willis was one of the executors of his father's will. By the summer of 1774 Willis Cherry owned land in Duplin Co, next to the 200 acres Thomas Bennett was granted on 22 July 1774 from the Crown. This land was on the north side of Goshen Swamp, and between Dry Pond Branch & White Oak Branch. Other neighbors at the time were John Oates, James Smith, and Joseph Wade.

Willis was in the Revolutionary War on the NC Continental Line in Wilmington District (Duplin Co area), and was granted 228 acres on Barton's Creek; this land was assigned (probably sold) to James Hicks on 12 December 1801 (warrant #3386, per thigpen). If so, the transfer was done by his heirs after Willis died in Duplin Co in September or October 1801. Willis was also in the NC Militia in Wilmington District. There are three warrant numbers associated with his service: #3356, #3675, and #3799. Willis witnessed two marriages in Duplin Co about 1780: the Sarah Bizzell - James Hurst marriage on 8 November 1779 and the James Bizzell - Mary Bowden marriage on 9 January 1781. This shows the close ties between Willis and the Bizzell families (Willis' son Lemuel married Sarah Bizzell).

In the 1784 state census of Duplin Co, Willis was the third from the last listed in the district of Captain Bowden's Company. In his home were one male over age 21 and under age 60 (Willis), two boys under the age of 21 (Lemuel & William), four females (his wife and three daughters), and one slave. Also in the same county in 1784 were other names with ties to the Cherry families in the counties to the northeast around Martin and Edgecombe Counties: Thigpen, Ward, Harrell, Grimes, Williams, Gray, Outlaw, to name a few.

In 1790 Willis' was the only Cherry family in the county (he was in the Wilmington District); in his home there were himself, three males under age 16 (born between1776 and 1790), and four females (Mary, the eldest daughter, married in 1788 and left her parents' home, and two more daughters were born to Willis and his wife since 1784). There were four slaves. In 1800 Willis was not found, but his wife Sarah ____ was; Willis was still alive, but since Sarah was the head of the household in the census, Willis must have been feeble, and perhaps bedridden. In her household in 1800 were two girls under age 10 (Nancy & Polly), two girls (Sarah & Rebecca) & one boy (George) age 10 to 15, two boys age 16 to 25 (William & Lemuel), Sarah, age 26 to 44, and seven slaves. The 1810 census shows Sarah living about midway between Lemuel and William, her two eldest sons (now married); she had one boy in her home, age 16 to 25 (George), one girl age 10 to 15 (Patience, Nancy now was probably married), herself age 45 or older, and six slaves. Sarah was also found in Duplin Co in 1820, living alone, age over 45. She was born between 1756 and 1765, according to the 1800 and 1810 census records, so was probably not the mother of Willis' eldest daughter.

Duplin Co court records from April 1785 and July 1785 reveal that Willis Cherry was the overseer in charge of clearing the main channel of Goshen Swamp in District 14 during the dry season. The swamp was the waterway by which barges and flat-bottom boats carried supplies into and out of the northwest corner of the county. District 14 was approximately four miles southeast of the present-day town of Calypso, and four miles northwest of Beaufancus. The hands working under Willis in clearing the waterway were James Bizzell, William Stone, Arthur Bizzell, Hardy Bizzell and his negro, Thomas Bennett, William Bennett, Samuel Bennett, "& all others belonging to their families. "

Willis left a will dated 12 October 1800 in Duplin Co, and he died in September or October the following year. His will named "beloved wife Sarah Cherry" (she received "one negro wench by the name of Juda" and a negro named Tess, plus household furniture and one-third of the plantation where Willis lived), his six daughters Mary Bennett, Elizabeth Millard, Rebecca Cherry, Nancy Cherry, Sally Cherry, Polly Cherry, and sons George Cherry, Lemuel Cherry, and son William Cherry (William received the plantation Willis bought from John Bradley on the north side of Pond Branch). Near the end of the will he named another daughter Patience Cherry, but also said he only had six daughters, and re-named them. Polly's position from the first list of daughters was replaced with Patience in the second listing. The two youngest sons, in addition to land, each received "one horse creater." Son George was under age 21 when the will was written. Witnesses were Hardy Bizzell, William Cherry, and Rebecca Cherry. Executors were Hardy Bizzell, and Willis' eldest son Lemuel; Lemuel was often called "Lamb" in the will. Willis could not sign his name, so made his "?" instead (he also made an "?" when he witnessed the two Bizzell marriages of about 1780). His nine children, all named in the will, were-

1. Mary Cherry, b abt 1768
2. Elizabeth Cherry, b abt 1775
3. William Cherry, b 1776-1780
4. Lemuel Cherry, b 1779
5. Rebecca Cherry, b 1784
6. Sarah Cherry, b abt 1785
7. George Cherry, b 1785-1790
8. Nancy Cherry, b 1790
9. Patience Polly Cherry, b 1795-1800 (68,99, 108,WD,5p,35maehijnypz)

Source: Cherry Biographies by John Young
 
CHERRY, Willis W. (I40941)
 
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